This book nearly broke me. I’ve never had that happen before. This is the only book that has ever made me stare out into space, shivering at times while I considered the implications of what had been written in my life.

I am speaking, of course, of Hush Hush.

Of all the soulless Twilight clones, this novel takes the cake and brings many of the most disturbing aspects of the books to their logical extremes. Be very, very afraid.

Hush Hush was written by Becca Fitzpatrick, and she claims that it took her five years to write the story. I actually don’t doubt this, for reasons I will discuss later. It was published, gained a massive fanbase, and became a bestseller. Fitzpatrick doesn’t seem to respond well to criticism, writing such joys as this article, basically saying that if you criticize her work, you won’t be published. As such, you’d better be grateful that I’m risking my future to tell you just what I think about this book. Not to say that it isn’t worth it.

This is the story about how a guy comes into a bright young girl’s life, belittles everything about her, mocks her dreams, and slowly breaks her down until there is nothing left of her. With no help from her mother, friends, or teachers, the young girl slowly sinks and starts to believe that this really is love. She begins lying to herself, her friends, her mother and the authorities. In the end she truly starts to see that this is really a good relationship and he is, despite all his faults, a good guy.

The problem is that the author thinks that this is romantic.

I really can’t claim that I didn’t have a clue what I was getting into. I’ve read ZeldaQueen’s sporking of the book; I’ve read The Sparkle Project’s review; and I’ve even gone to see what they say on Amazon. I even noted that my library had this thing listed as ‘horror’. I thought I had a good idea what I was in for.

I was not prepared.

Cover Impressions

Fun fact: According to one reviewer of this series who was actually in favor of the books, Hush Hush and Twilight can’t possibly be alike because the covers are different. I’ll give you that.

The guy falling from the sky with wings falling apart is interesting. Apparently, the effect was caused using a trampoline. My problem with this cover is that it promises something that it’s not going to deliver. It promises plot. It makes you ask just why there’s an angel falling from the sky, and why his wings are falling apart. It promises to explain this and live up to the kind of neat imagery.

There is no quote on the front of this book by another author. I find this amusing because Fitzpatrick was saying that without her quote on the front of my book, it won’t be published. It appears that she did fine.

But, I’m a lowly unpublished writer who knows nothing about such things.

Plot

From Amazon:

Nora Grey is responsible and smart and not inclined to be reckless. Her first mistake was falling for Patch. .
Patch has made countless mistakes and has a past that could be called anything but harmless. The best thing he ever did was fall for Nora. .

After getting paired together in biology, all Nora wants to do is stay away from Patch, but he always seems to be two steps ahead of her. She can feel his eyes on her even when he is nowhere around. She feels him nearby even when she is alone in her bedroom. And when her attraction can be denied no longer, she learns the secret about who Patch is and what led him to her, as well as the dark path he is about to lead her down. Despite all the questions she has about his past, in the end, there may be only one question they can ask each other: How far are you willing to fall?.

Alright, here we go:

Our story starts with a prolog taking place in medieval France where a young man, just finished up with seeing some prostitute, which automatically makes him evil I guess. He is mindraped into submitting to a Fallen angel. Who has legs. This point is made very clear. He has legs. Take note of this. This guy is called one of the Nephilium, and suddenly we’re in a modern say school room.

Nora Gray, our protagonist who at least has a normalish sounding name, is about to take every teenager’s rite of passage: Sex-ed. This is being taught by the a coach who I don’t think has any business teaching anyone anything. Particularly since his taste in décor involves naked Barbie and Ken dolls smiling at the students. This would have unnerved me when I was in high school.

The coach separates up the class and forces Nora to sit with the new student. A guy with the ultimate bad boy name of Patch,1 who has “a smile that spells trouble with a promise” (whatever that means). He wastes no time in starting to hit on her, make inappropriate comments and reveal that he’s pretty much been stalking her for a while. He knows her hobbies, future goals, dislikes, what instrument she plays, and belittles all of them. He also gives no information about himself. Nora is not impressed which makes he somewhat like her. She goes to the coach to get her to switch them. He refuses despite the fact that she flat tells him that Patch frightens her.

This is one of the things that makes this story so completely disturbing: for a good part of the novel, Nora acts like a normal person. She’s scared of Patch and his advances, and watching her slowly sinking into this relationship was one of the most sickening things I’ve never done.

The next day, Nora tries to get Patch to cooperate, gets humiliated in front of the class when the coach asks Patch what he finds attractive in a woman2, and he basically says he likes them vulnerable, while making eyes at Nora. This is treated as attractive. Patch refuses to answer Nora’s questions continues to tell her that he’s stalking her, gives her his phone number and tells her that she’ll call him. Nora once again begs the coach to switch them. The coach feels too good about himself to consider that some little girl is feeling threatened by this guy.

When she tells her best friend, Vee, (who is once called “a few pounds over curvy” and then basically called fat through the rest of the novel) about the whole thing, Vee actually thinks that Patch is hot. So no help from her friends. Also a girl named Marcy Miller is introduced at this point. She is our Scary Sue for this novel, and she does absolutely nothing for the entire stinking novel, contributes nothing and pretty much exists so that Nora can show just what a wonderful, pure girl she really is.

Marcy slams Vee for being too fat, and Nora for being a nerd and then goes on about her life.

Obviously, Nora is forced to call Patch for the sake of her grade, and he is a smarmy smirking effeminately fluttering dandy about the whole thing. He lords the fact that she caved in over her head for a while, and tells her that he’ll talk to her if she goes to the pool hall to meet him.

Yes, you did read that right.

The pool hall.

Fitzpatrick, you seem to be slightly confused about what era you’re in. You seem to be under the impression that this is the nineteen fifties and badboys go down to the pool hall, wear black leather jackets and slick their hair back. Please do a little more research on what people actually do, or at least mention that this some kind of quirk.

Nora goes to said pool hall, and she shows the first signs that the author is gnawing on her intelligence. She starts to find him infuriating in a hot kind of way as opposed to really, really threatening. The way she saw him before. Anyways, he hits on her some more, doesn’t answer her questions, and if I were Nora, I’d pretty much allow myself to fail Sex-ed. And then launch a complaint against the teacher.

Of course, Nora doesn’t complain, and the moment she’s away, she pretty unhappy about things. It would have helped more if she’d just said no.

The next day, she meets Elliot, a transfer from an expensive private school. He’s nice and appears interested in her, and Vee starts pouting about how Nora has two guys. Nora wishes she didn’t have one of them, yet she keeps noticing Patch. During gym, Marcy appears and attempts some really, really awkward flirting. I mean the kind where she pretty much says ‘everyone sleeps with me, so you will too’. Now, I’m not a guy, but I’m pretty sure that, if I was one, this wouldn’t be something that I’d consider attractive. I’m pretty sure that most guys wouldn’t. This scene is pretty much the ONLY reason for Marcy’s existence in this book as well. Anyways, Elliot, showing some sense, isn’t interested. Nora is shocked and amazed that someone would not consider the blonde cheerleader pretty much demanding that they go out attractive.

Elliot invites Nora and Vee to an amusement park where they meet up with this friend, the completely silent Jules. Jules…is silent. I think he’s holding some kind of silent protest for being forced into this book. Vee finds him attractive.

While they’re there, Nora runs into Patch, who is obviously stalking her. Instead of threatening to call security or something if he doesn’t leave her alone, she goes and talks to him. For some reason, he gets her to agree to go to the rollercoaster called the Archangel3. Which is still made of wood and thinks that a hundred foot drop is a big deal. It depends on if it’s a straight drop or not, Fitzpatrick. Get with the times. Because Nora’s a stereotypical good girl, she hates rollercoasters, but she still agrees to go with him because Patch promises that if she doesn’t scream, he’ll tell the coach he wants to switch partners.

Because Nora’s feelings are just so insignificant. The coach will listen to Patch but never to an icky girl.

Nora suffers from some kind of hallucination that involves her being about to fall out of the coaster. Naturally, she screams. Patch is smug.

Now, I’ve actually once nearly fallen out of one of those cars. I was with my dad when I was very young, and the difference between our sizes was such that the shared bar offered me a lot of room to move. On one of the drops, I nearly flew out, and it was only because my dad grabbed me that nothing happened. The experience was terrifying, and the fact that Patch sits there and belittles Nora for being afraid of a similar experience makes me see him as a Complete Monster.

Is the killing of a fictional fallen angel murder? I see it as a service to humanity.

When they return, Nora finds out that everyone left her behind and went home without telling her. That was nice. Patch volunteers to drive Nora back to her isolated farmhouse where her mother isn’t home. Sounds like a bad idea to me, but she goes along with it. Naturally, Patch has a motorcycle to show what a badboy he is. Despite the fact that this guy has admitted to stalking her and has made his fair share of comments that could easily be seen as sexual harassment, Nora is more worried about what her mother might think if she found out.

When they get back to the farm house, Nora remembers that she’s with a guy who has commented on what how he’s watched her study from her bedroom window, and doesn’t want to let her in. Patch forces his way into her house and pretty much force-teaches her how to make tacos at knife point. I’m serious. Nora suddenly is finding herself attracted to him and wanting to kiss him. This is one of the points where I slammed the book shut and couldn’t touch it for a few days.

Once Patch leaves, Nora’s mother comes home, and in the conversation, which ranges from Nora’s dead dad to her mother’s work, this question is asked.

“Mom, were you ever afraid of Dad?”

Alarm bells should be ringing in this woman’s head at this moment. She should be interrogating her daughter on just who is making her ask this question. Any good, caring parent should be worried. Naturally, Nora’s mom doesn’t seem to get the message.

So, Nora goes upstairs, calls Vee and gets upset with her for leaving her. Vee shrugs it off and is very interested in what happened with Patch and the fact that they almost kissed. Nora, now sane, is unhappy with it and herself. Then she realizes that something was outside her upstairs window when she hangs up and is terrified.

At this point, the book’s tone changes abruptly. As well as the characterization of…everybody. Other than Patch. Patch is the same. This is way I’m pretty sure that it did take her five years to write this. Fitzpatrick started to write one story, but then she read Twilight and decided to use what she was already writing to see if she could make a clone.

So, the next day, Nora and Vee go shopping, (or rather Vee goes shoplifting4 and Nora goes shopping) there’s some awkward dialog about bras that no seventeen year old girl would say, and all of a sudden, Vee is telling Nora that Patch is bad news.

What.

On the way home, Nora is suddenly almost ran off the road and attacked by someone and Vee is hospitalized some time later. Vee thinks it’s Patch, since he was about the right size with the right eye color. Nora doesn’t believe her, but she continues to ask questions about him.

Meanwhile, at school, three things happen: one, there’s suddenly a new psychologist named Ms. Green who is telling Nora that she should avoid Patch, Nora discovers that Elliot (who is suddenly acting like a sleazy used car salesman) is suspected of murdering his ex, and Patch follows Nora out into the parking lot and gives this stunning example of his personality:

“A guy like me could take advantage of a girl like you.”

And this guy is considered a protagonist. We’re supposed to find this sexy.

So, that night, lying to her mother about going to the library, Nora goes out to talk to Patch at the pool hall. A fight breaks out (making someone was cheating) and Patch’s shirt gets ripped, showing off some lovely scars on his back. Nora automatically thinks that they’re wings because the paintings on the Archangel ride showed a falling angel with similar scars. Because when I’m not sure about something, I look to carnival rides. She goes home, sneaks onto the computer, and googles it. But instead to using Wiki like a normal person, Nora looks up some weird personal website (rather like Bella) that calls itself Fallen Angels: The Terrifying Truth. Now, most people would think that this was written by a nut, but Nora believes it. This book claims that everything about the Fallen, which the site does call demons, that it says is verified by the Book of Enoch, which it seems to think is part of most people’s Bible as opposed to only being accepted if your a member of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. According to it, Fallen can’t feel anything physically, they can only possess people during the Jewish month Cheshvan,5 and that only works on the Nephilium.

Nora believes the whole thing.6

Yeah guys, the plot, such as it is, has finally managed to wander in. It’s a little drunk and very late, but hey, it’s here right?

On the way to walk to the hospital, (I guess this is a small town) Nora gets lost, and ends up asking a homeless woman for directions. This homeless woman acts like no other homeless woman I’ve ever met and demands Nora’s mittens and coat, and after revealing that it’s only down the alley, she walks away. And is promptly shot by a sniper. I am not making this up. She is shot by a sniper out of nowhere.

Nora, being upset, calls the one person she things can help her: Patch. Because when I feel terrified, I call my stalker/sexual predator. Patch turns up in a pickup truck that he claims to have won off of someone, takes her with him, and instead of taking her home like he said he would, he takes her to a hotel and demands a room. The clerk, completely ignores Nora’s protests and the fact that she obviously doesn’t wish to spend the night there, and gives them one. The moment they’re alone, Nora goes back to trust him completely and allows herself to sleep there. With him. I know that I was supposed to be squeeing or something, but I was actually feeling kind of sick.

Oh, she lies to her mom about what’s going on. Isn’t Nora a great daughter?

Nora, like a good Sue, has a Significant Dream, where Patch and another Fallen are talking about what they’re going to do with their Nephilium who have been basically enslaved by them. It is greatly implied that they’re going to use these bodies to have sex. Oh, just for future reference, the actual owners of the bodies are completely aware the whole time they’re possessed.

Anyways, Patch implies that he doesn’t want to do anything, he wants to be human. Which is the first I’ve seen of him actually having anything but scorn for all humanity. The dream changes to Patch talking to Ms. Green, who is revealed to be a real angel. She tells him that since she loves him, she’s been trying to get him to be re-accepted by the angels, and that she’s finally done it. He can be a guardian angel. Patch gets snippy and says that he’s an Archangel and he doesn’t want to protect the pitiful humans he wants to be human. Green says that to do that, he needs to kill someone. He says he’s already got a girl who’ll work.

You did just read that right. He’s been following Nora around just so that he can bring her here to this hotel and murder her. So he can be human.

When she wakes up, Patch knows what she saw, pins her kicking and screaming to the bed, admits that he was planning to kill her, that he did all this to kill her in cold blood, and then says that he doesn’t want to anymore.

This is another point where I couldn’t read further for a while. I just…couldn’t.

And then Ms. Green attacks out of nowhere. Once again, we’re not allowed to see the fight scene, which might have been at least tolerable, because Patch gets Nora out of there and proceeds to fight off screen. Nora then gets a call from Vee, who decided to break into school in the middle of the night after she got out of the hospital so that she could play hide and seek. I repeat that: she want’s to play hide and seek.

And she’s seventeen.

…Maybe I’m a little out of touch being homeschooled and all, but…er…the people that I knew when I was seventeen considered themselves to be a little old to play hide and seek.

At that point, Elliot takes the phone, tells Nora that if she doesn’t turn up, Vee is dead, and hangs up.

What does Nora do? She goes to watch a movie!

Yep.

Patch turns up, and Nora doesn’t want to go with him, but as usual, no one listens to her. I’d feel sorry for her if her selfishness didn’t pop up so much by this point. Patch literally drags her out and forces her to go to the school. They look around, Nora splits up from Patch, and then when Nora goes into the chem lab, Jules pops up, locks the doors and basically tells her to sit down, shut up or her friend is going to die.

Feel free to cock your head in confusion about just where this came from.

In the space of three sentences establishes himself as the most sympathetic character in the book. It’s revealed that Jules was the noble from the prolog that everyone’s forgotten about. He’s been forced to live for the last couple centuries, getting possessed by Patch (while he was completely aware remember) for a few weeks out of the year, and fathering little Nephilium. Which include Nora. Jules is…shall we say irked with Patch, and is out to kill him. Which involves killing Nora, since Patch likes Nora now, and Jules wants to hurt Patch as much as possible before he kills him.

Oh, and he shot that homeless woman thinking that it was Nora. This guy’s really on top of things.

The whole plot is full of holes. If Jules really wanted to kill Nora, why didn’t he just sneak into her room? Why wait? Nothing is ever explained.

Patch, naturally, turns up, reveals that Elliot is a stooge and is dead now7 and possesses Nora so that he has the power to kill Jules. Nora ends up getting killed, and then comes back to life for some reason that’s really beyond me.

They leave, the police arrive. Nora’s mother is happy that Nora’s managed to live through this. Vee lives and is just as stupid and shallow as ever. I rather wish she had died.

Nora admits that she really loves Patch, and he really loves her. They ride off in a motorcycle together, and Nora feels that Patch is redeemed. Or something.

Oh, by the way, for even more fun, it’s revealed that the Fallen can do mindcontrol. So all of Nora’s feelings and thoughts could easily be from her being controlled by Patch to do, say and think whatever he wants her to. All of those moments where she’s afraid of him could be her coming out of his control just long enough to be scared of what’s happening only to succumb to the mindcontrol again.

Sweet dreams.

How it should have gone

Everything could have gone up to the hotel, where Jules and Elliot suddenly break in and save Nora while she’s with Patch. They manage to get away, reveal to Nora that she’s being controlled, find a way to break it and return her to her original personality, such as it was. Jules reveals that he’s her great great something great grandfather, and he realized that Patch was going to try to kill her. He transferred to her school to protect her from Patch and to get revenge of course. Elliot reveals that Patch killed his girlfriend, who he thought was a Nephilium, and tried to blame the death on Elliot. Jules got Elliot out of it and told him what was really going on.

Elliot wants revenge for his girlfriend, so he joined up with Jules to track down and finish off the demon known as Patch.

So, after learning about all this, Nora finds about that Patch took Vee hostage, and demands that she come and be killed by him. Nora appears to come alone, but brings not only Jules and Elliot, but Ms. Green, who isn’t a Yandere, and is furious with him for breaking her trust. They eventually overpower him, Patch dies, Jules is finally able to die, and there’s some hope for Nora and Elliot to have a relationship in the future.

Doesn’t that both make more sense and seem ten times less creepy?

Patch

Patch is going to get his own section because really, I don’t think I can fully talk about him in a single paragraph.

Patch is the most disturbing male character I’ve come across in my life simply because he’s treated like a protagonist. No protagonist has ever behaved like this and been called a ‘good person deep down’ by the author. Maybe the fans when they write about them, but not the author. Even Eragon and Edward Cullen never decided to break down a girl’s defenses, get her to like them, and win her trust and affection only to murder her. At least those two pretended that they were normal, but Patch doesn’t. He doesn’t change in the book. He doesn’t see that anything he’s done is wrong. He just walks away with a pat on the back from the author, and I’m supposed to be thrilled that he was there.

Now, I’ve heard a lot of justification for Patch. Of course, there’s the claim that he really does love Nora and his stalking and sexual harassment are signs of that affection. I refuse to even consider that argument.

Still others simply say that this is a badboy love story and we need to get in touch with our inner sixteen-year-old to enjoy it fully. At sixteen, I had a thing for Kenshin, Riku from Kingdom Hearts (but only after Chain of Memories), and Ryou Bakura. So, I liked either really sweet guys or guys who were reformed in some way. I guess my inner sixteen-year-old doesn’t really help.

Another defense of Patch is sorry for the stuff he’s done, and he wanted to be human. Garbage. Patch shows no liking for people. He enslaves some guy for over six hundred years; he treats everyone around him like they’re a lower life form; and he obviously enjoys seeing the human that he’d enslaved suffer. What is there about him that wants to be human? Also, even if he wanted to be human, it means that he’d still have to kill someone to do it. So, no matter what, he’s a selfish little monster.

What’s really funny is that Patch acts a lot like what I’d think a demon would be like, so, in a way, Fitzpatrick did do the characterization of one of the Fallen right. The only problem is that the whole thing was about as romantic as watching a serial killer obsessing over a girl and then deciding that he didn’t want to kill her after all.

Other characters

Nora Grey, our female protagonist isn’t one of the worst heroines I’ve come in contact with, but she’s one of the ones that disturbed me the most. At first, she acts like she’s actually frightened of Patch, which makes reading the story hard. With Luce and Clary, they were so dumb and unsympathetic, that it was hard to muster up the emotion to worry about them as they went headlong into an abusive relationship, but Nora at first seems at least aware of the danger she’s in. And as she evolves into a typical selfish, unsympathetic heroine, it’s almost like watching Patch taking over her. What’s worse is when you realize that as the Fallen can mindrape people into thinking whatever they want, you never know how much of Nora’s actions are really of her own choice or not. She contributes very little to the ‘plot’ of the story, but she certainly raises some issues.

Vee is a character who was designed at first to be the backstabbing best friend, which seems to have been left over in her general lack of concern for the fact that Nora was being stalked. She’s supposedly the more boycrazy of the two (it’s one of her two defining traits) and she is fat. This is brought up repeatedly, and I find it rude. Vee contributes very little to the whole plot, other than being stupid enough to think that hide and seek was an acceptable game to play for teenagers. Unless she was being mindraped too… I really don’t want to think about that.

Elliot is an odd character. At first, it seems like he’s being set up to be the love triangle, but then suddenly, Fitzpatrick seems to change her mind and make him evil. Maybe she realized that he was ten times more interesting, likable, and more normal than Patch. His past with his girlfriend is brought up a few times, but doesn’t really make sense. Apparently, he had enough money to pay his girlfriend an apartment of her own, but then it’s said that Jules got him the money and he was a poor scholarship student. What happened to his family is never described, neither is the fact that as he was a suspect, when Vee and Nora were attacked, he probably would have been the first person questioned.

Jules is without a doubt the most sympathetic character in this book. Which is saying something because in the space of a few sentences, he proved that his eternal life as a Fallen’s little puppet was more horrifying and monstrous than Patch’s having his wings torn out. Honestly, I was cheering for Jules when he said he watched to kill Patch. He even shows more remorse over killing Nora than Patch ever showed to planning to kill her. He was set up to be a kind of surprise villain, but he said so little in the book until the end, that, as a reader, it just didn’t make any sense.

Marcy Miller is…well…really only there to be shamed for her evil cheerleading ways and for being an evil skank. She serves no other purpose in this novel. None. She’s not even a real antagonist since she only turns up three times. What really irks me with this character is that it’s childish and showing something like SMeyer’s obvious deep rooted jealousy of blondes because they snubbed her in high school. If you want your main character to be a virgin, good for you. If you want to have her not have sex in your book, terrific. It’s totally unnecessary to cram a scene in there where the heroine sits on her laurels and sneers at anyone who has. Marcy’s character is an insult to everyone. Whether you’ve slept with someone in high school or not. If you have, you’re obviously a flat, shallow monster who likes causing people pain. If you haven’t, you didn’t do it because of lack of interest or religious convictions, you did it because you’re saving yourself for your Twu Wuv.

Setting

There isn’t one. Fitzpatrick takes no time to describe the place where Nora lives. There’s no sense of space or location, and the entire place feels like a basic sketch that’s only there so the main characters can walk around.

The only thing that really strikes a person is that everyone, from the bum on the street to the waitress to the teacher is a jerk. Everyone acts like a complete ass, sees nothing wrong in Nora’s situation and completely ignore the cries for help that she does make. It’s like those horror movies where the director has decided that he wants to develop the characters so that it’s sad when they die, but the only thing they end up doing is making the audience wish the monster would kill every single one of them within the first five minutes. There is not a a single grounded person in this universe.

Badboys

I really hate this stereotype. It’s unrealistic, and it gives me flashbacks of a movie I once saw where a girl gave up everything she ever believed just because she like some badboy, and decided to be like him. What’s more, it’s completely setting a girl up for an abusive situation.

However, I also understand that the stereotype, in essence, involves a girl seeing through a guy’s reputation to see that he’s really a wonderful, sweet guy who takes care of kittens and would only hurt a real jerk. If only this was what actually happened in most literature.

The problem with the romance and the ‘plot’ of this book is that Fitzpatrick seems completely clueless that a for there to be a Jerk With a Heart of Gold, he must have a Hidden Heart of Gold.

Even Clare, for all of her inability to pull it off, did know that she had to at least invoke that trope with Jace. Fitzpatrick just seems to think that girls all want to be raped or something.

Moving on.

Mechanics

I wouldn’t say that Fitzpatrick’s prose is purple, but it is…odd at times. Lines such as

He had a smile that spelled trouble with a promise.

are fairly common. The structure of the story on the other hand is a mess. This thing follows Twilight’s pattern of having nothing happen and takes it even further. Fitzpatrick actually breaks up her action for weird, nonsensical scenes like Nora going to a movie theater to get away from Patch only to have him show up and watch as people bully her some more. Also, her characterization fluctuates like crazy on all the characters other than Patch.

Now, this could be the fact that Patch is really mindcontrolling everyone so that he play out his creepy little daydreams, but it’s more likely that this is just bad writing. Nora fluctuates between being a scared girl with a stalker that no one takes seriously following her around and a selfish little twit who whenever someone tries to step in to help her (like the police) gets all defensive of her sweet honey. Vee and Elliot are the same way. One minute they are one way, and the next, when it is convenient for the plot, they are completely different.

Villains

As a general rule, it’s usually a good thing to make sure that your protagonist is more sympathetic and likable than your antagonist. That’s pretty much Fitzpatrick’s greatest problem: her main character is more villainous than the villain.

Face it, the moment that you have someone who can possess people, you have a moral/ethical dilemma on your hands. If Patch had been suitably sorry about the whole thing, and shown it, the story might have worked. Someone who shows no remorse about possessing someone is pretty much irredeemable.

And I refuse to accept SMeyer’s justification that we can’t judge something non human because they don’t see the thing the way we do, and they’re so superior to us.

Possession is bad, Fitzpatrick. It’s the ultimate form of slavery. The fact that Jules doesn’t want to be possessed anymore is understandable. The fact that he wants to kill Patch is commendable. In the hands of a sane author, Jules would be a hero and a man fighting against a supernatural monster.

Even the fact that he plans out killing Nora is pretty much only there so that we see him as a villain, but that only works when you forget the Patch was going to do the same thing. As such, because Jules at least has an understandable motive for his actions, and maybe if Nora had planned with him, he might have changed his mind and worked together with her to kill Patch, Jules is less of a villain that Patch is.

Mythology and Religion

While Kate Lauren seemed to have some kind of thing against religion in general, Fitzpatrick just seems kind of clueless. Now, I’ve already stated the problems with with using the Fallen as protagonists in a novel. It just opens up a can of issues that need to be resolved. Fitzpatrick seems to not understand this and takes great lengths to pretend that the Fallen aren’t evil, despite how she herself characterizes them. She insists on having people call them the ‘devil’s angels’ as opposed to ‘demons’ and never seems to notice that running around, possessing people and using them to father more easily enslave-able half-humans to flip off real angels is actually wrong. Same thing with God. She’s got the Christian(ish) view of angels, but doesn’t seem to realize that God is usually involved.

Now, on the Book of Enoch. This book is considered to be an apocryphal text to pretty much every major Christian group, and it seems that the Jews don’t consider it canonical either. The book itself is, in many ways, rather interesting. It hints that Noah was albino (which does give a reason why he was somewhat separate from the general populace at the time) and basically says that all weapons, practice of magic, and other such knowledge was given to us by the Fallen, who are most definitely evil. There is no mention of them only being able to possess people at a certain time, nor is there anything about having their wings torn out in my reading8. I’m calling this out because Fitzpatrick is obviously sure that no one has ever read this book and is relying on that for her story to work. That’s not necessarily the case, as I’ve just shown.

Once again, it would have been possible to basically say that our ideas about angels were wrong. It could have been done, but Fitzpatrick seems so out of touch with what people actually think that she assumes that people will be alright with this. What’s worse is that there are probably people stupid enough to, even though they have a Bible, to think she’s telling the truth.

Final Assessment

I hate this book.

The characterization fluctuates, the so-called love interest gives me nightmares and the plot has about as many holes in it as a wire mesh pasta drainer. The author seems out of touch with how people and the world works in a modern setting, and she just claims to do research when she’s pulling stuff out of the air. What’s worse is that there are people who actually like this book. Who think that Patch is a good character.

I would happily recommend Twilight before recommending this book.

Even after this review. You are not prepared. Nothing could prepare you for the monstrosity that is this book, and if I never get published for saying it, I remain unrepentant.

Score: 0 of 10 (There is nothing redeemable about this novel)

Next up: City of Glass

1 Yeah, that’s his name. And Fitzpatrick seems to think that we’re supposed to think it’s tough sounding. It just reminds me of one of the puppies in 101 Dalmatians.

2 From what I’ve read, this scene was apparently something that happened to Fitzpatrick. She was told to write about a humiliating experience. She wrote this scene. And then she gets it into her head that this is…endearing?

3 This isn’t the first hammer of foreshadowing that Fitzpatrick drops on us. Patch also insists on calling Nora ‘Angel’, regardless of the fact that she obviously doesn’t like it. Remember, this is supposed to be attractive in a guy.

4 Which is no one, including Nora, so much as says ‘boo’ to. I admit, I was waiting for her to be caught on the security cameras and be hauled away by security.

5 In the Gregorian Calender, it occurs in October-November. Wiki wasn’t really clear on it, so I’m going to assume that it varies slightly.

6 I’m leaving out some stuff where the police turn up and act stupid, and Nora suddenly gets really defensive and can’t believe that Patch could ever really hurt someone. Oh, and how she lied to her mom about how Patch is into swimming.

7 He claims that he found Elliot dead, but I wouldn’t be surprised…

8 Actually, angels aren’t usually described as winged. They’re just painted that way. Ezekiel did mention that Cherubim have two faces though.

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Comment

  1. Darkes on 23 August 2012, 11:29 said:

    Wow, this Becca Fitzpatrick person sure seems like a bitch.

    Really, is there anything worse than a terrible writer who’s also a terrible person? Well, a published one, I guess.

  2. Pryotra on 23 August 2012, 11:52 said:

    Really, is there anything worse than a terrible writer who’s also a terrible person?

    A terrible writer who’s a terrible person who has managed to convince a bunch of overly hormonal teenage girls that she’s a good writer.

    And from what I know about her sequels, she gets worse.

  3. swenson on 23 August 2012, 12:43 said:

    She goes to the couch

    Amusing typo there. :)

    “Mom, were you ever afraid of Dad?”

    Dear goodness. If a guy ever—EVER—makes you be afraid of him (I don’t mean he plays a trick and you’re freaked out temporarily or he jumps out of a dark closet to make you scream or whatever, I mean you actually associate fear with him), RUN AWAY. TELL SOMEONE. GET HELP. Because that is just plain creepy and wrong.

    Nora believes the whole thing.

    I really don’t get this. Twilight actually manages to sort of make it work, with the van incident and Jacob telling her the legend about the Cold Ones, but here… if I saw a guy with weird scars on his back, even if I did think “those look kind of like wings”, my first reaction would NOT be to google fallen angels. Why would I even think of the supernatural at all?

    This isn’t an issue unique to “supernatural in the real world” books, but it does show up far too often in them. For some reason, the protagonists just jump to the conclusion that the supernatural exists, when there’s no legitimate reason for them to think that. This is purely because the author’s too lazy to set it up properly, or s/he quite correctly realizes there’s no possible way the story as it’s told would actually make someone think of the supernatural, so they throw in some hamfisted and unconvincing symbolism and call it a day.

    And you know what else is lazy? The SIGNIFICANT AND ODDLY ACCURATE DREAM. There is never an explanation for them, it’s just “I need character X to have some information, but I have broccoli for a brain and can’t think of any way for X to get it. So I’ll just have them conveniently get a dream about it, and believe the whole thing, and it turns out to be true somehow even though I never mentioned prophetic dreams before this and I never mention them again.”

    Ms. Green confuses me, by the way. OK, so she’s an angel, a real one, and she believes Patch is repentant and wants to help him become an angel again. So… she tells him to murder someone? And she attacks him randomly? Those don’t seem like very angelic behaviors to me!

    Throughout this, I did wonder if Patch was controlling her mentally, because she’d start to like him when he was around, then be upset and horrified the rest of the time. Then you mentioned mind control, and I was convinced. He was totally controlling her the whole time, wasn’t he?! That’s just creeeeepy.

  4. Pryotra on 23 August 2012, 12:54 said:

    Twilight actually manages to sort of make it work, with the van incident

    I’ll give it that. At least there was a reason to think that there was something odd going on. In there…there’s…nothing. Other than a ride with some weird drawings on it.

    “I need character X to have some information, but I have broccoli for a brain and can’t think of any way for X to get it. So I’ll just have them conveniently get a dream about it, and believe the whole thing, and it turns out to be true somehow even though I never mentioned prophetic dreams before this and I never mention them again.”

    …This. So much. From Bella to Luce (whose dreams I never mentioned) to Nora they are all like this!

    So… she tells him to murder someone? And she attacks him randomly? Those don’t seem like very angelic behaviors to me!

    Well, she says that he’ll have to kill someone to be human, but she doesn’t want him to, but she doesn’t care that much. She gets mad when Patch doesn’t kill Nora because it must mean she loves him.

    Or something.

    Throughout this, I did wonder if Patch was controlling her mentally, because she’d start to like him when he was around, then be upset and horrified the rest of the time. Then you mentioned mind control, and I was convinced. He was totally controlling her the whole time, wasn’t he?! That’s just creeeeepy.

    THANK YOU! That was the creepiest part of the entire book. And it was just causally thrown out there.

    Patch: Oh, yeah, I control minds. It’s romantic ‘kay?

  5. Wraith Attendant on 23 August 2012, 13:32 said:

    Horror indeed.

    It’s almost funny how blatantly that summary is trying to invoke Twilight with the meeting in Biology and the bedroom stalking. Except, if I’m reading this correctly, didn’t they meet in Sex-Ed in the book? Unless it was part of the usual biology class, which would explain why it’s for a grade, but pulls up the same problem Twilight had in why 17-year-olds are in a biology that isn’t AP or remedial.

    It’s unrealistic, and it gives me flashbacks of a movie I once saw where a girl gave up everything she ever believed just because she like some badboy, and decided to be like him.

    Would that have been Grease? Guy tries to stop acting like an idiot, fails repeatedly, but the girl does a complete 180 and suddenly it’s perfect!

  6. Fireshark on 23 August 2012, 13:57 said:

    This is highly disturbing. Seriously. This Patch guy is evil. He’s not just some bad boy, he is pure evil. I guess that makes sense if all Fallen are demons, but the fact that anyone thinks demons are romantic is scary, to be honest.

    Off topic, but I remember once thinking that the storyline in Star Wars: Attack of the Clones should have been like this, where Anakin’s first step toward the Dark Side would be using the Force to get Padme to “fall in love” with him. That would have been some evil, Darth Vader-type stuff, and it would strengthen the whole metaphor of the Dark Side seducing a Jedi.

  7. Sahgo on 23 August 2012, 14:27 said:

    Agreed with every single part of the article; this book is awful. But I want to dig a little deeper into the plotholes regarding the angels thing — I mean, I KNOW there are far too many to bother, but…I dunno, the fantasy writer in me was just groaning the whole way through.

    - At a point in the book, Patch’s fallen-angel friend, Rixon (Nixon? I can’t remember) mentions that, to become a guardian angel, you need to save someone’s life. “And I would do it, if I knew someone who was about to die” (paraphrase). This line made me smash my head against the table. SO. HARD. It gets worse — “Dabria” (Ms. Green) mentions in the flashback that the next person to die would be Nora. The attempts at her life only started MONTHS after she mentions this. So, Fitzpatrick is implying that NOBODY IN THIS WORLD, or in the city at least, died in the months between this conversation and Patch’s meeting with Nora. My… brain…

    - Patch tries to kill Nora to become human, like, three times; once at the amusement park, once in the kitchen and finally in the hotel. And THEN in the hotel scene, he reveals that…the person who dies needs to sacrifice him/herself willingly.

    This plothole is so…humongous, so…THERE, it’s like this book wasn’t revised.

    In the end of the book she sacrifices herself for Patch, which turns him into a guardian angel. But he “refuses” her death, and then she comes back to life. Yeah. You read that right. And yet he becomes a guardian angel anyways (?)

    - And that gets me to my next peeve — apparently her death causes Jules to die. Because….? I think they mentioned something about the death of a female descendant causing his death or something, but really, it’s just stupid. He dies when Nora sacrifices herself, but doesn’t get back to life when she does. Why? Because.

    - This book has one of the stupidest scenes of all time (and that says something!), a little scene I like to call “Fitzpatrick has no idea how the internet works”. Nora finds out about how Elliot might-or-not have killed his ex (spoiler: he did. Sorta), and prints an article about it. The article is then stolen from her room (supposedly, by Elliot, though it’s never made clear). He stole an article that is READILY AVALIABLE in the internet and that was printed in his old school’s NEWSPAPER. This happens. And Nora never reprints it or thinks about this; she’s immediately “Oh, he wanted to stop me from revealing the truth!”. Facepalm.

    - The reason why Nora keeps lying to her mother is because, if she knew about her problems, her mother would move out; and Nora CAN’T have that because that house is THEIR house and it’s where her dad’s memories ARE and if they move out she’ll lose her CONNECTION to her dad. Oh, and her mother admits having financial problems to keep the house, hating the job she is currently in…so, in other words, Nora ignores the danger she’s in AND keeps her mother in an unconfortable job just so she wouldn’t have to (gasp) move out. Seriously. Seriously.

    There are more (TONS MORE), but these listed really made my skin crawl. Hate this book so much.

    Ah, and one thing:

    Nora, like a good Sue, has a Significant Dream

    It’s a little more stupid than that. She touches Patch’s wing scars and that literally sucks her up to flashbacks of his life. Eyup. Apparently touching fallen angel wing scars just does that.

  8. Danielle on 23 August 2012, 15:32 said:

    He is mindraped into submitting to a Fallen angel. Who has legs. This point is made very clear. He has legs. Take note of this.

    Yes. Because while most angels have arms and legs, fallen angels lost theirs when….they…fell….to…Earth? Or….Satan repossessed their appendages to build his palace? Why would demons—sorry, fallen angels—keep working for a guy who stole their limbs?

    Anyway, Patch is Speshul because he stole his arms and legs back from the devil. And he calls himself Patch because he patched his arms and legs back onto his body.

    Huh. Even with that bit thrown in, the book still makes zero sense.

  9. OrganicLead on 23 August 2012, 16:12 said:

    Fallen Angels: The Terrifying Truth.

    I imagine that webpage has a black background, red text and a few animated gifs of spinning crosses. Maybe a midi of the Buffy theme playing in the background.

    Really, there’s nothing else I can say about the summery that hasn’t already been covered.

  10. Nate Winchester on 23 August 2012, 17:36 said:

    I was not prepared.

    No Illidan reference? Shame!

    Nora Grey is responsible and smart and not inclined to be reckless.

    I am now convinced that this book takes place in the same universe has 50 shades of grey. Don’t question it!

    It just reminds me of one of the puppies in 101 Dalmatians.

    Reminds me of…

    Oh, just for future reference, the actual owners of the bodies are completely aware the whole time they’re possessed.

    That… that could have been interesting. That Patch was two people, the evil obsessed demon and the possessed man who sort of likes Nora and doesn’t want to hurt her or do anything. And maybe Nora is falling more for the man that occasionally shines through than the demon who torments her. So she tries to save a love she hardly knows…

    You know, if the author was trying.

    What’s really funny is that Patch acts a lot like what I’d think a demon would be like, so, in a way, Fitzpatrick did do the characterization of one of the Fallen right.

    Thank you, I was thinking that exact thing!

    Vee is a character who was designed at first to be the backstabbing best friend, which seems to have been left over in her general lack of concern for the fact that Nora was being stalked.

    Everyone acts like a complete ass, sees nothing wrong in Nora’s situation and completely ignore the cries for help that she does make.

    You know what would have also worked? That Nora has some kind of immunity to Patch’s mind wammy (again, like Bella) so he actually starts hitting everyone else’s mind to drive her into his arms. Forcing her to be isolated… that would have been a creepy horror story.

    However, I also understand that the stereotype, in essence, involves a girl seeing through a guy’s reputation to see that he’s really a wonderful, sweet guy who takes care of kittens and would only hurt a real jerk.

    I’ve heard it theorized before (though as always, YMMV), that guys’ “virgin/whore” complex has to do with their biological desires. That they want a woman who is a whore to them (so they produce lots of offspring) but a virgin to every other guy (so guys don’t have to try raising competing genetic material). On the flip side, girls have a “protector/thug” complex (to keep with our car themed acronyms). Biologically, they want a man who is a protector to them and a thug to everyone else (in order to give herself and offspring the best chance of survival).

    Of course, there will be varieties when it comes to individuals, but I do think it’s on to something when it comes to the “bad boy” phenomenon.

    Actually, angels aren’t usually described as winged. They’re just painted that way. Ezekiel did mention that Cherubim have two faces though.

    Yeah, another instance of people confusing metaphor with reality. (Angels were typically painted with wings to imply their great speed – Revelation says that some have 6 wings but since 4 of those are used as body coverings, I wonder if they are actual wings, or if ‘wings’ was just the closest word the older languages had to describe them.)

    So I’ll just have them conveniently get a dream about it, and believe the whole thing, and it turns out to be true somehow even though I never mentioned prophetic dreams before this and I never mention them again.

    That COULD have worked here, since angels so frequently have dream powers in the Bible, but as a motif on the whole? …yeah =P

  11. Epke on 23 August 2012, 18:59 said:

    I just threw up a little in my mouth.

    I can understand the Bad Boy appeal. I even get the Love Can Touch Evil crap. What I don’t get is how someone, anyone, can find a stalking monster (and not like a Buffy Monster of the Week either, but the very dredge of humanity) who preys upon young girls to be even remotely romantic. When someone makes you afraid, truly afraid (and waves a knife at you), you don’t think about kissing them. You knee them in the crotch, smash a vase on their heads and for good measure, swing a frying pan wildly as hard as you can. Then you run and call the cops.
    Ugh, Patch could give Jason Vohrees a run for his money on the Crazy-ass-psycho meter.

    What I find really, really disturbing though, is that books like these sell. They sell well, and some critics think they’re good and recommend them. Might as well hand out a pamphlet with a bruised woman on it, with big, bold letters that say “It’s Your Fault – He Really Loves You” to young, impressionable teenagers. Argh, this pisses me off.

    About the Book of Enoch here… aside from the Ethiopian Church, no one views the books as canon. If I remember correctly, the ancient rabbis excluded it because it humanized the Angels, El’s first children, and gave Enoch a prominent and non-acceptable role in Heaven. All the stories about… their names, uhm… Azazel, Samael (who would evolve, partially, to Christianity’s Lucifer) and some others who taught Men how to read, write, work the soil etc. was, and is, more or less considered bullcrap by the ancient Hebrews. Why, oh why, any fictional character would take the word of a website at face value is beyond me.

    I need to rinse my eyes with better portrayed angels. Castiel, lay on hands please. And brainbleach. Lots and lots of bleach.

  12. Pryotra on 23 August 2012, 21:30 said:

    Apparently touching fallen angel wing scars just does that.

    Maybe I somehow missed that because I couldn’t take the stupid anymore. It just…didn’t make sense. I honestly thought it was just a random dream. Yeah this thing really doesn’t make any sense. I left out most of the plot holes because…well…it would have taken too long…

    Yes. Because while most angels have arms and legs, fallen angels lost theirs when….they…fell….to…Earth? Or….Satan repossessed their appendages to build his palace? Why would demons—sorry, fallen angels—keep working for a guy who stole their limbs?

    Anyway, Patch is Speshul because he stole his arms and legs back from the devil. And he calls himself Patch because he patched his arms and legs back onto his body.

    That makes more sense then most of the the stuff in this book. Though…Satan would really have a hard time getting his limbless legions to be very useful. Maybe that’s one of the reasons why he’s going to lose. Bad planning. The creepy palace is not more important than effective legions of doom.

    That Patch was two people, the evil obsessed demon and the possessed man who sort of likes Nora and doesn’t want to hurt her or do anything. And maybe Nora is falling more for the man that occasionally shines through than the demon who torments her. So she tries to save a love she hardly knows…

    I might have actually liked that if it was handled well. It would have been a kind of Jekyll-Hyde thing.

    That Nora has some kind of immunity to Patch’s mind wammy (again, like Bella) so he actually starts hitting everyone else’s mind to drive her into his arms. Forcing her to be isolated… that would have been a creepy horror story.

    I honestly don’t think that things could get any creepier than they are here. Just because the author thinks that this is romantic.

    What I find really, really disturbing though, is that books like these sell.

    I have to agree that this is really the most upsetting part of the whole thing. I know people in college who think that Patch is sexy, and when I said that I thought he was an utter monster, they told me I need to get in touch with my sixteen year old and he really loves Nora.

    What’s worse, is from my knowledge of the other books in the series, which isn’t much, Fitzpatrick starts setting up the other Nephilium, who are pretty much rebelling against the Fallen and trying to kill them all, as the main villains.

    Everything in this story is completely wrong, messed up and horrible.

  13. Danielle on 23 August 2012, 21:33 said:

    bq.Though…Satan would really have a hard time getting his limbless legions to be very useful. Maybe that’s one of the reasons why he’s going to lose.

    So by that token, would that make the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail a minion of Satan? :P

  14. Pryotra on 23 August 2012, 21:35 said:

    So by that token, would that make the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail a minion of Satan? :P

    He’ll bite our kneecaps off if we’re not careful. Very frightening.

  15. Danielle on 23 August 2012, 21:37 said:

    He’ll bite our kneecaps off if we’re not careful. Very frightening.

    Now picture it: a whole army of legless, armless demons who want nothing more than to bite off your kneecaps. I’m getting sweaty just typing this.

  16. Pryotra on 23 August 2012, 21:44 said:

    Now picture it: a whole army of legless, armless demons who want nothing more than to bite off your kneecaps.

    Somehow, I don’t think this plan for the destruction of humankind was very well thought out…

  17. Sweguy on 24 August 2012, 06:44 said:

    Dafuq did I just read? It all seems so… random…

    Can’t someone write a novel where the heroine is surrounded by all these abusive boyfriend-sterotypes (Edward, Patch etc.) only to have her realize how horrible they are, and then have her turn to the antagonists (like Jules for instance), which sort of were just misinterpreted by everyone. That would be great.

  18. Pryotra on 24 August 2012, 09:15 said:

    Can’t someone write a novel where the heroine is surrounded by all these abusive boyfriend-sterotypes (Edward, Patch etc.) only to have her realize how horrible they are, and then have her turn to the antagonists (like Jules for instance), which sort of were just misinterpreted by everyone. That would be great.

    If that happened, I would not only buy that book, but I’d probably write the first and only Positive Reader Review just so that everyone knew that it existed.

  19. OrganicLead on 24 August 2012, 12:00 said:

    Can’t someone write a novel where the heroine is surrounded by all these abusive boyfriend-sterotypes (Edward, Patch etc.) only to have her realize how horrible they are, and then have her turn to the antagonists (like Jules for instance), which sort of were just misinterpreted by everyone. That would be great.

    Or have her go to the friends and family who’ve been telling her to stay away from the bad boy the entire book for support. The first way might accidentally do the exact same thing the book is deconstructing by making the villain a good guy in the end. In case you forgot, Jules was trying to kill her as well.

  20. Juracan on 24 August 2012, 12:15 said:

    Dear God, I’m not annoyed that this was published as much as the fact that it has fans. I don’t understand…

    -What the hell kind of name is ‘Patch’ for a fallen angel? It doesn’t even sound like a ‘bad boy’ name; it sounds like more of a grease monkey than anything else. Who the hell needs a bad boy romantic lead and names him ‘Patch?’

    -Patch honestly sounds like he could have been one of the best villains of young adult fiction in the modern era. But instead he’s the romantic lead. Look, when readers get that impression, there’s a problem. Becca Fitzpatrick, please, please seek help.

    -Um… is there a reason given why Patch wants to be human, other than just ‘cause? Because that’s a major change, switching species/spiritual physiologies…

    Can’t someone write a novel where the heroine is surrounded by all these abusive boyfriend-sterotypes (Edward, Patch etc.) only to have her realize how horrible they are, and then have her turn to the antagonists (like Jules for instance), which sort of were just misinterpreted by everyone. That would be great.

    The world needs books like this.

  21. Pryotra on 24 August 2012, 12:51 said:

    The first way might accidentally do the exact same thing the book is deconstructing by making the villain a good guy in the end.

    Well, it would actually make more sense for Jules to be better than Patch, but if the family and friends got involved, it would be interesting. Or if the police were effective.

    -Patch honestly sounds like he could have been one of the best villains of young adult fiction in the modern era.

    I completely agree! Patch could have been a wonderful villain. Simply with his creepy supernatural rapist vibe he’s horrifying. If you’d ignore the fact that someone would have to stick the leather pants on him, it would be perfect.

  22. Minoan Ferret on 24 August 2012, 15:47 said:

    Fun fact: According to one reviewer of this series who was actually in favor of the books, Hush Hush and Twilight can’t possibly be alike because the covers are different.

    Strangely, that doesn’t work with Eragon.

    Fitzpatrick seems to think that we’re supposed to think it’s tough sounding. It just reminds me of one of the puppies in 101 Dalmatians.

    Reminds me of Patches from Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls.

    You seem to be under the impression that this is the nineteen fifties and badboys go down to the pool hall, wear black leather jackets and slick their hair back.

    Aaaayyyyyy!

    Now, I’m not a guy, but I’m pretty sure that, if I was one, this wouldn’t be something that I’d consider attractive. I’m pretty sure that most guys wouldn’t.

    True! And I’m pretty sure that if I were a girl I wouldn’t find Patch and his abhorrent behaviour attractive. That some girls actually do think he’s sexy, etc, makes me worry.

    Anyway, congrats on actually surviving this.

  23. Oculus_Reparo on 24 August 2012, 21:34 said:

    I was homeschooled, too! And my mother would never have allowed us to spell trouble with a promise.

    Another possibility for how it might have gone: what if Nora ended up killing Patch herself? Maybe she somehow realized he was controlling her mind and, while she couldn’t deny her feelings for him, she had to overcome them in order to break his hold on her and save ___ (insert character who needs to be saved), as well as herself.

    That would still make for a pretty dark story, but at least it would get rid of this horrible character!

  24. Oculus_Reparo on 24 August 2012, 21:38 said:

    ^ Wait . . . that’s pretty much what you already suggested. Never mind!

  25. Pryotra on 24 August 2012, 21:43 said:

    (insert character who needs to be saved)

    Those are few and far between in this book. I can’t think of anyone unless I ooc them enough to be sane.

    It would be an interesting idea. Breaking his hold by force of will might unbalance Patch enough to make him vulnerable.

    What’s horrible about this whole book is because Patch can mindcontrol people, you’re never sure if someone’s really saying something or if the person just thinks that’s what their saying. For instance, Jules could have been pleading with Nora to help him and Vee could have been trying to tell her that Patch was doing something and Nora would have heard threats and the whole hide and seek thing. Nora is, in essence an unreliable narrator. And since this lovely’s written in first person, you never know if any of what happened was real or not.

    Just Patch’s promise that he didn’t mindrape her. Which is worthless.

  26. Rorschach on 25 August 2012, 05:29 said:

    Don’t really have much to say except I really enjoy this series of reviews. Also this book sounds bad enough to make me put a shotgun in my mouth.

    Keep up the good work!

  27. Pryotra on 25 August 2012, 15:41 said:

    Don’t really have much to say except I really enjoy this series of reviews.

    That’s plenty. I’m really glad that you like it!

    Also this book sounds bad enough to make me put a shotgun in my mouth.

    And from what I’ve heard, it gets worse in the next books. If that’s even possible. Maybe her final book manifests itself as some kind of negative space wedgie or something.

  28. Juracan on 29 August 2012, 19:54 said:

    Wait, wait, wait, I just thought of something:

    Why the hell does Patch need to possess people?

    Okay, I know you said that Patch uses his host to go around and father Nephilim, so apparently Patch can’t father children without a human host. Fine, fair enough, but as far as I know this isn’t part of the Book of Enoch. So why introduce this element in the first place? Yes, it creates the antagonist (or rather, the second one, because Patch seems to act pretty damn antagonistic), but why not have him be another fallen angel or something? By making the whole possession subplot/element, all they do is make the antagonist sympathetic, more sympathetic than anyone else?

    Dear Lord, I’m thinking too hard about this…

  29. Pryotra on 29 August 2012, 20:41 said:

    but as far as I know this isn’t part of the Book of Enoch.

    It isn’t. I checked.

    So why introduce this element in the first place?

    I’m not sure. I think it’s supposed to show that Patch has been a ‘bad boy’ for a while. And it also takes the blame off of him. Because if Jules is a jerk it automatically makes Patch innocent. Or something. Don’t ask me to look into how Fitzpatrick’s mind works.

    Just so you know, in the second horror of this series the antagonists are…a group of Nephilium who are sick and tired of the Fallen and plan to kill them.

  30. Nate Winchester on 29 August 2012, 21:03 said:

    Just so you know, in the second horror of this series the antagonists protagonists are…a group of Nephilium who are sick and tired of the Fallen and plan to kill them.

    Fixed it for you – no charge.

  31. Juracan on 30 August 2012, 18:05 said:

    Just so you know, in the second horror of this series the antagonists are…a group of Nephilium who are sick and tired of the Fallen and plan to kill them.

    How long is this abomination anyway? How does one stretch out the story that much?

    Wait, what does the title have to do with anything? Even though the title Twilight had no real significance, it at least set the atmosphere. Where does the title Hush, Hush come from? Is there even a title-drop?

  32. Epke on 1 September 2012, 14:47 said:

    Where does the title Hush, Hush come from? Is there even a title-drop?

    I think Hush, Hush is meant be like “keep a secret, shhh” but given the nature of Patch and the general theme of the book, something like this would be more appropriate as the source of the title:

    Patch lay next to me in the bed, his arm around me in an iron grip that I knew I couldn’t escape. The only source of light was the moon that shone in through the window and while it illuminated me just fine, it left Patch’s face in the dark and only the occasional glint of his eyes broke the darkness he was veiled in. But it wasn’t his eyes I was staring at: it was the foot long kitchen knife that he was slowly and gently trailing across my skin while whispering to me.
    “I’ll always take care of you, Nora. Always.” He leaned in close and drew a deep, long breath as if he inhaled the scent of my hair and I had to fight back the terrified tears and urge to gag: he’d punish me if I started crying.
    “Please, Patch… can I just go to sleep now? You can spend the night if you want, but just… just let me sleep a little.” He chuckled and ran the knife up my arm now, pressing just slightly harder than before. A thin, white line appeared where the tip had been and I promptly shut up.
    “Sshhh-sshh, my angel. Of course you can sleep.” And then he used a sing-song voice that made my skin crawl. “Hush, little angel, don’t you cry, everything’s gonna be alright… Patch’s gonna hold you…”
    But I didn’t fall asleep. As the minutes became hours and the light of the moon faded from my window, Patch continued to hum the sickening tune over and over again, all the while stroking me with the knife-tip.
    “You know you’re my special girl, don’t you?”
    “I know, Patch.” I couldn’t stop the tears this time and then he began again.
    “Hush, little angel, don’t you cry…”

    Of course, that’s because I think Hush, Hush is a slasher fic and Fitzpatrick originally wrote it like this but then hit her head against a wall and rewrote it. Can’t prove it though :/

  33. Pryotra on 1 September 2012, 15:57 said:

    O_O

    This is…so…appropriate.

  34. Perry Rhinitis on 4 September 2012, 11:03 said:

    Spot on, Epke, spot on.
    The coach teaching the sex-ed class reminds me of <i>Mean Girls</i>. In my Catholic all-girl private high school, our Christian Living (R.E.) teacher was our sex-ed teacher. Of course, we were all taught that condoms have holes large enough for the AIDS virus to pass through.

  35. Tim on 11 September 2012, 02:47 said:

    Actually, angels aren’t usually described as winged. They’re just painted that way. Ezekiel did mention that Cherubim have two faces though.

    Depends, in they actual Bible you’re right, but angelic lore is fond of giving them completely non-human appearances and often not just wings but lots of wings. Depictions of Lucifer the Archangel (pre-fall) have been known to give him twelve wings that complete hide his body.

  36. Danielle on 13 November 2012, 20:54 said:

    I know it’s a bit late in coming, but I stumbled upon this thread not long ago.

    For those of you too lazy to read it, there is going to be a fourth Hush, Hush book called Finale. The OP of this thread tells “haters” this:

    You guys need to stop complaining, either be happy there’s gonna be a fourth book or keep your hate comments to yourself. A lot of people who come to this page do like Hush Hush and on behalf of the Hush Hush fans we do not enjoy reading all the nasty things about how it sucks so much because in our opinion it’s amazing. The book is not even out yet, so you have no right to hate on it. Honestly, all you’re going to do is anger the fans.

    Here are some responses:

    THANK YOU for saying this. Troll haters need to leave.

    oath, these haters just really annoy me, if they don’t have something nice to say then they shouldn’t say it.

    Exactly! I mean who do they think they are??? The author puts so much time and effort into writing a book and then these unappreciative people come and say bad stuff about it?? Like seriously??

    And my personal favorite….

    Damn, for a thirteen year old that was seriously mature, very well said. I my self am sixteen and in total agreement with you; If you’re gone put up a hater comment, at least tell us why you don’t like it with logical reasons. Otherwise it’s just annoying. I really love this series, personally, there’s something about the way that Becca writes that just hooks me in, you know? Anyway, just wanted to say ‘you go girl’ and all of that :)

    I don’t know whether to laugh, cry, or knock myself out from facepalming so hard.

  37. Pryotra on 13 November 2012, 21:34 said:

    Ah, fanbrats. They never seen to realize that their comments only made me want to get Crescendo and rip into it with a vengeance. What do you bet that they’ve never actually read the criticism of this book. They just call everyone who doesn’t join with the hive mind ‘hating haters’ and ignores what they say.

  38. Apep on 13 November 2012, 22:42 said:

    Now I really want to quote the hate speech from I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, just to give a bit of perspective.

  39. Tim on 13 November 2012, 22:46 said:

    oath, these haters just really annoy me, if they don’t have something nice to say then they shouldn’t say it.

    Yeah, if you listen to critics you might end up being able to form sentences that say what you’re actually trying to say.

  40. Danielle on 13 November 2012, 22:51 said:

    Ah, fanbrats. They never seen to realize that their comments only made me want to get Crescendo and rip into it with a vengeance. What do you bet that they’ve never actually read the criticism of this book. They just call everyone who doesn’t join with the hive mind ‘hating haters’ and ignores what they say.

    I shudder to think what they’ll be like when they get older….

    Now I really want to quote the hate speech from I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, just to give a bit of perspective.

    I’m not familiar with that one.

  41. Apep on 13 November 2012, 23:56 said:

    Here it is, as spoken by the psychotic computer AM, in all it’s glory and horror:

    HATE. LET ME TELL YOU HOW MUCH I’VE COME TO HATE YOU SINCE I BEGAN TO LIVE. THERE ARE 387.44 MILLION MILES OF PRINTED CIRCUTS IN WAFFER THIN LAYERS THAT FILL MY COMPLEX. IF THE WORD HATE WAS ENGRAVED ON EACH NANOANGSTROM OF THOSE HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF MILES IT WOULD NOT EQUAL ONE ONE-BILLIONTH OF THE HATE I FEEL FOR HUMANS AT THIS MICRO-INSTANT. FOR YOU. HATE. HATE.

    Kinda makes any complaints about “haters” seem a bit petty, doesn’t it?

  42. Sylvia on 8 May 2013, 04:27 said:

    Lovely review. Thank you SO much for sparing me from this horrid piece of “lierature”. As a friend so gracefully put it…. “I could paint my face with black ink, slam it into a piece of paper, and come out with a better story than this!”

    As for the link to “Finale”….I don’t have a profile, and so I cannot comment for myself, but I believe the perfect reply would be “This is one of my favorite slasher/horror books! Patch is the creepiest stalker villain I’ve ever read! Go away haters! XP”

    Watching them try to wrap their brains around that would be amusing. But then, that’s just me being antagonistic. X3

  43. Duck Duck Goose on 18 January 2014, 03:57 said:

    This is a very terribly written review. It’s obviously one-sided and makes every little thing sound completely stupid, which is possible to do for literally anything in this world, and on top of that, it’s easier to do here because everything is taken completely out of context. It’s not a helpful review at all in any way.

    I could shrug off the bias, whatever, I’ve already accepted that this was THAT kind of review. But it’s the small things that really irked me while reading this.

    It’s seriously hard to believe teenagers would break into a school and play hide-and-seek in the dark? Hide-and-seek isn’t some Duck Duck Goose nonsense, it can be fun at any age – ESPECIALLY in a school during after hours. These are kids looking for a good time while feeling rebellious. Welcome to teenagers?

    Man, I could go on lol this was terrible. I am seriously bored enough tonight to be reading this garbage. I’ve never read Hush, Hush, but I have never heard a good thing about it necessarily, and I like to think it’s written in the same way this crap was.

    Thanks for the entertainment.

  44. Tim on 18 January 2014, 05:49 said:

    Clearly your teenage years either sucked or took place in an Enid Blyton story.

  45. Tim on 18 January 2014, 05:50 said:

    Also, how can you tell anything was “taken out of context” if you haven’t read the book?

  46. Pryotra on 18 January 2014, 08:38 said:

    Also, how can you tell anything was “taken out of context” if you haven’t read the book?

    Because, obviously any time that someone makes a completely negative review, it must be out of context. Or they’re lying and don’t want to admit that this is really just fan raging because I didn’t like the story.

    Personally, I find it funny that the most offensive thing that they found was the lame hide and seek thing, and not that reveal of ‘rawr your friend is dead’ to movie transition, which would seem to any normal person to have been taken out of context.

  47. Asahel on 18 January 2014, 12:12 said:

    What I like best was that the “I’ve never read it comment” was followed up with an “I’ve never heard anything good about it” comment…

    So, you’re complaining about a negative review of something you’ve never heard a good thing about?

    Makes perfect sense.

  48. Resistance on 18 January 2014, 15:32 said:

    It’s seriously hard to believe teenagers would break into a school and play hide-and-seek in the dark? Hide-and-seek isn’t some Duck Duck Goose nonsense, it can be fun at any age – ESPECIALLY in a school during after hours. These are kids looking for a good time while feeling rebellious. Welcome to teenagers?

    Yes, it is. First of all, schools are locked, so they’d really have to find a way to break in. Breaking and entering is punishable by law. And if they want to play, and Ms. Fitzpatrick wanted to have it more realistic, have them go to the local abandoned mall/adult video store/house. That’s plenty rebellious.

    It’s obviously one-sided and makes every little thing sound completely stupid, which is possible to do for literally anything in this world, and on top of that,

    Maybe that’s because every little thing is completely stupid.

    it’s easier to do here because everything is taken completely out of context.

    Been pointed out before, but how the hell would you know, not reading it and all.

    It’s not a helpful review at all in any way.

    It’s a review, not an edit or a editorial commentary. They’re not meant to be helpful, they’re meant to espouse one’s opinion.

  49. Epke on 18 January 2014, 15:39 said:

    Duck Duck’s level of sense is on par with air conditioning advertisement.

    it’s easier to do here because everything is taken completely out of context.

    Except it is not. I have read Hush, Hush at this point, so I can confirm this review makes perfect sense.

    These are kids looking for a good time while feeling rebellious. Welcome to teenagers?

    Uhm… did you grow up in a small town where the highest form of entertainment was shooting gophers or something?

    I’ve never read Hush, Hush, but I have never heard a good thing about it necessarily, and I like to think it’s written in the same way this crap was.

    So you haven’t read the source material, haven’t heard anything either good or bad about it, nor by the looks of it anything by Fitzpatrick if you think Pryotra writes that badly, and yet you make comments like that? Dude. Stay out of the gene pool, thank you very much.

  50. Miranda on 13 April 2014, 14:30 said:

    Okay Hush Hush wasn’t a very good book but it made sense. I just read it the other day and it’s one of my least favorite books but this review bugged me.

    The completely bashing of the book seemed way too rude, I understand that it was a crappy book but there’s no need to rude.

    The whole lack of plot thing that you’re pushing, there was a plot, it pretty much sucked and could have been improved a billion different ways but through the entire book I could tell there was a plot. I admit I spent many chapters bring completely confused but by the end of the book the problems were explained in a mostly logical way.

    The only other thing that bugged me about this review was how you left out everything else. You took the bad things and left out the reasons for the bad things.

  51. Danielle on 13 April 2014, 19:40 said:

    The only other thing that bugged me about this review was how you left out everything else. You took the bad things and left out the reasons for the bad things.

    What sorts of “bad things” are you talking about?

  52. Carol on 18 March 2015, 16:39 said:

    Just had to read Hush Hush for research I’m doing on YA. Laughed out loud at your spot on review. There was a kernel of an idea that a good writer could have built a decent book around. It wouldn’t be the first time a character wanted or was ordered to harm someone, but love or conscience prevented him from doing so (check out Snow White). And, yup, teen girls like to fantasize about bad and/or dangerous boys. BUT NOTHING IN THIS BOOK MAKES SENSE!

  53. TMary on 10 December 2016, 00:27 said:

    …….!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I just – this book – what. It sounds like it makes Edward Cullen and Christian Grey look like ideal loving spouses.

    What is this? Who thought it was a good idea?

    I actually saw this book in the library once, read what it was about, and rolled my eyes so hard it hurt. I mean, really, a romance about fallen angels? Really?

    But I expected the book to make said fallen angels sympathetic. You know, like they were super nice actually and tragically misunderstood, but this…this is exactly how I would expect a demon to behave, and yet he’s treated like this is fine – I – what?

    You know, I have a character who is kind to his love interest in every way (I mean, sure, sometimes he makes mistakes, but who doesn’t?), but at one point he gets frustrated – not with her, per se, just life in general – and takes her by the shoulders while he’s talking to her. He’s not going to hurt her, he wouldn’t even consider it, he doesn’t even grip her arms, he’s just trying to let her know he means what he says (especially as he’s not good with words).

    And I’m still worried about whether this is over-the-top aggressive behavior and should be cut.