City of Glass – Introduction

Hello, lovely peoples! And welcome to the beginning of the City of Glass sporking! It’s been a long time coming – I started spoking City of Bones waaaaay back in 2012 – so this particular monkey has been on my back for a while.

But enough of that – let’s start delving into this thing.

As with my sporkings of the previous two books, I’m using the Kindle version. This means I’m technically getting the latest edition of the book. Let’s take a gander at this bad boy, shall we?

Well, I’ll grant it this – these versions are a big step up from the previous editions. If nothing else, I wouldn’t feel too embarrassed to be seen reading this on a but. The fact that this one only includes two notes: one pointing out that it’s part of the “#1 New York Times Bestselling Series” (which I feel speaks more for the taste of the target audience than the quality of the work); the other stating that it’s “Soon to be an ABC Family Original Series,” which is clearly trying to capitalize on the TV adaptation – not surprising, considering how badly the film version did.

But still, it’s an improvement over the ‘random character’s torso looming ominously over the city skyline’ aesthetic of previous editions. And the lack of a plug from Stephenie Meyer doesn’t hurt, either.

That said, I still have issues aplenty. For example, who exactly is this supposed to be on the cover? Is it Jace? Alec? Simon? Why is there a chin on the floor? Why is the background a swirling mass of red graphics? As a reader, this isn’t exactly the kind of thing that would pique my curiosity.

Now, let’s check out the blurb, courtesy of Amazon:

Love is a mortal sin, and the secrets of the past are deadly. Plunge into the third installment in the internationally bestselling Mortal Instruments series and “prepare to be hooked” (Entertainment Weekly).
To save her mother’s life, Clary must travel to the City of Glass, the ancestral home of the Shadowhunters—never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death. To make things worse, she learns that Jace does not want her there, and Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.
As Clary uncovers more about her family’s past, she finds an ally in mysterious Shadowhunter Sebastian. With Valentine mustering the full force of his power to destroy all Shadowhunters forever, their only chance to defeat him is to fight alongside their eternal enemies. But can Downworlders and Shadowhunters put aside their hatred to work together? While Jace realizes exactly how much he’s willing to risk for Clary, can she harness her newfound powers to help save the Glass City—whatever the cost?
Love is a mortal sin and the secrets of the past prove deadly as Clary and Jace face down Valentine in the third installment of bestselling series the Mortal Instruments.
Includes an exclusive sneak peek of the fourth book in the Mortal Instruments series: City of Fallen Angels! And don’t miss the teaser from Clockwork Angel, the first book in the Infernal Devices trilogy, the prequel to the Mortal Instruments series.

Oh my stars and garters. Let’s take this one piece at a time, shall we?

Love is a mortal sin, and the secrets of the past are deadly.

1)In no religion that I am aware of is “love” considered a “mortal sin.” Even the friggin’ Jedi code doesn’t forbid “love”. What the hell are you talking about?
2)“the secrets of the past are deadly” – No they’re not. In fact, they can be quite enlightening. And in this particular case, they are in no way deadly.
3)Neither of these statements connect to each other in any way. These are two complete non sequiturs shoved together to try to sound “deep.”

prepare to be hooked” (Entertainment Weekly).

A quote from Entertainment Weekly. Well, it’s not Cosmo Girl, but I guess any recommendation will do.

To save her mother’s life, Clary must travel to the City of Glass, the ancestral home of the Shadowhunters—never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death.

I could complain about why Clary has to go, but that actually gets addressed. Poorly, but it is addressed. Also, her entering the city without permission isn’t an issue, so this isn’t just deceptive, it’s false.

Also, we’ve run into an example of one of my biggest pet peeves with this series – the Random Capitalization to make words look Important. There is no reason for “Law” to be capitalized here, unless it’s to make my eye twitch.

To make things worse, she learns that Jace does not want her there, and Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.

Another list!

1)Why should Jace’s opinion matter one whit in this instance? He’s not in charge of Clary.
2)Of course the Shadowhunters would be suspicious of Simon – he’s a vampire who can walk around in daylight. I’d be surprised if they weren’t suspicious.

she finds an ally in mysterious Shadowhunter Sebastian.

This will be our first hint that CC intends to write another love-triangle plot into this book. I swear, this is the only plot-line she knows.

But can Downworlders and Shadowhunters put aside their hatred to work together?

Could we please not act like both parties are equally culpable? I’ve read the previous books – 90% of the time, if there’s any drama between Shadowhunters and Downworlders, it’s because of the Shadowhunters.

“While Jace realizes exactly how much he’s willing to risk for Clary, can she harness her newfound powers to help save the Glass City—whatever the cost?”

Again, the second clause does not logically follow the first. This is not how you English! And as for the “whatever the cost” bit, don’t pretend like these characters ever face any real danger.

Love is a mortal sin and the secrets of the past prove deadly

Saying this again doesn’t make it any more true, or any less stupid.

Includes an exclusive sneak peek…

Which I will not be looking at. And you can’t make me.

Now that we’re done looking at the book’s exterior, let’s see what you’d only find by actually opening the thing.

Well, first is something new (at least to me): a map of New York City, with several of the major locations marked out and illustrations of their exterior. This would actually have been quite helpful for people who neither live in nor know much of New York’s geography memorized.

Or, it would have, in the first two books.

But this is the third book. Which takes place almost exclusively in a made-up location, for which no map is provided. Making the map (at least in this instance)

Entirely Pointless: 1

Wow, haven’t even started reading the book and we’ve already got points on the board.

Moving on to the Forward.

All the stories are true

Oh, sweet Jesus. Not this crap again. I thought you gave up on this after the first book, CC.

CC discusses what Jace “means” by this, implying that it was actually some deeper meaning to it, rather than the obvious, surface-level meaning he clearly intended.

All the stories are true.

Stop saying that.

Now CC goes into her intentions when she started writing her the first book, and how she liked “stories about vampires and faeries and warlocks,” but also liked mythology. She name-drops Paradise Lost and Dante’s Inferno – by which I assume she means one of the many adaptations, as opposed to the first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy – presumably to show how well-read she is or something. But she also Mike Carey’s comic, Lucifer, presumably so she doesn’t alienate the geeks or something.

Blah, blah, she wanted a world “that was rich in folklore […] but which also incorporated the existence of figures of myth,” by which she means angels and demons. Can’t help but think some folks might be a mite offended at calling this stuff “myth.” Also, CC was “delighted” by the idea of powerful objects – like swords that belonged to actual angels – being real. All I get from this is that she never really read any Urban Fantasy, because that’s kind of all over the place in the genre.

Then she gets into how everything in her world comes back to angels and demons. Now, I’m a straight, cis-gender, White guy, but even to me this feels like cultural appropriation. You’ve tried to cram creatures from many diverse cultures into your world, CC, and trying to tie them all into one a system based largely on Judeo-Christian belief is incredibly disrespectful, not to mention stupid. But then, you didn’t exactly show a ton of respect for these myths in the first place (ex: ifrits being magic-less warlocks with red skin, rather than powerful spirits made of fire).

All the stories are true.

Do I need to start a drinking game?

CC discusses how she came up with Shadowhunters being Nephilim. She fails to mention that Nephilim are only mentioned about three times in the Bible, that the term “sons of God” is never explained, and that the term is most often translated as “giants”. So the idea of them being half-angel, half-human is all pop culture. Not to mention that CC’s Nephilim aren’t really the “descendants” of an angel, they’re just the results of some warlock’s experiments.

Also, CC takes this opportunity to shit on humanity by pointing out all our “weaknesses.” But it’s okay, because by mixing all those “weaknesses” with the absolute pure goodness of an angel, she was just adding a “twist” to this particular story.

Hey, CC? You want a real “twist” on the angel story? How about the idea that they don’t have free will, and just mindlessly follow orders? That’s been done. Hell, how about the idea that they’re maybe not really good, and may in fact hate humanity? That goes back to at least 1995, with the Christopher Walken film The Prophesy (yeah, this even pre-dates Supernatural’s take). Here’s a clip where Walken’s Gabriel explains exactly what angels do, and how he feels about that.

All the stories are true.

TAKE A SHOT!

Last bit. CC continues to ret-con some depth into Jace’s comment. It still fails, because I’m not an idiot. Discussion of Clary being “a girl who starts out ordinary and becomes a hero.” I’d buy that, except I’ve read this and the previous books. Clary’s acts of “heroism” are largely incidental – she’s just there. She might get in the final blow or whatever, but she never actually works for it. She never works to “master” her powers; instead, they just fall into her lap.

Moving on.

This book is dedicated to CC’s mom, with the line, “I only count the hours that shine.” I’m fairly certain that that’s a quote from something, but since this entry is long enough as-is, I’m just going to move along.

To the acknowledgments. And ooh, boy, is there some good stuff here.

We start on a good note, with CC talking about how writing a novel is a “group effort”. But given how this is her third published novel, I’d think this wouldn’t be quite so shocking at this point.

The actual acknowledgements begin with what I assume to be writing groups, calling out a few members in particular, with thanks for the, “hours of plotting help.” Given that I’ve read this book, I have to wonder how much of said hours was actually spent on plotting.

CC gives shout-outs to a few other people for various things, like bringing her bagels, and showing her clips from Gossip Girl; one person gets thanked for presumably intimidating CC into actually writing (hint: if you require being threatened to write something, maybe that’s a sign).

She thanks someone for helping her with Romanian. Given that there’s only one instance of Romanian being spoken, I have to wonder why it was included in the first place.

(Actually, I don’t – I know exactly why it was included. The reason is probably about as stupid as you think it is.)

Thanks are given to her agent, editor, and publisher, which is fine and good. One person is specifically mentioned “for making changes long past deadline.” You know, CC, if you’re still making changes after the deadline, that kind of speaks poorly of you as a professional.

Final thanks go out to her family – mom, dad, other people (Siblings? Cousins? Who knows), and a Josh, “who still thinks Simon is based on him (and he may be right).” All I can say is that, given how Simon is treated, CC must really not like Josh.

One last thing before I call it a day: the epigraph. This book decides to open with a quote from Paradise Lost:

“Long is the way/ And hard, that out of Hell leads up to Light.”

Honestly, it wouldn’t be a Cassandra Clare book without a pretentious, totally out of context quote.

For the curious, this is from lines 432-433 of Book 2. It’s Lucifer, after he and his rebel angels have been cast out of heaven, getting down to business. Hell is a prison, and escaping is going to be tough. He goes on to describe just how tough, in excruciating detail.

But Lucifer, being the badass motherfucker that he is, will brave all those dangers, if only to prove that he is, in fact, worthy of still being their leader.

But that’s about all this quote means – getting out of Hell will be difficult.

Oh, sure, people can ascribe more meaning to it, but in context, it’s really not profound in any way whatsoever. It’s like this meme:

To quote the phrase often attributed to Freud – “Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”

That’s all for now. Next time, we get into the actual meat of this book.

Counts

Entirely Pointless: 1

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Comment

  1. The Smith of Lie on 10 February 2018, 02:53 said:

    Great to see you starting on it Apep. Impish Idea has been a little dead lately, so I’m happy to see any Spork actually happen here, but your ones were always among the best.

    You have my sincere sympathy for having to expose yourself to those books.

    She name-drops Paradise Lost and Dante’s Inferno – by which I assume she means one of the many adaptations, as opposed to the first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

    Well that’s funny, since Dante’s Inferno not only is the exact title of an adaptation, but of an especially bad one. Namely a PS3 era slasher published by EA, which has Dante a crusader instead of a poet. And his journey though hell includes slaying hordes of demons with a giant scythe made from a spinal cord. I’ll freely admit never actually reading Divine Comedy, but what little I know about suggests that Dante’s Inferno isn’t a very faithful recreation…

    Blah, blah, she wanted a world “that was rich in folklore […] but which also incorporated the existence of figures of myth,” by which she means angels and demons.

    She should have takien some lessons from Mike Mignola. Juracan has mentioned some issues with Hellboy series, but it is hard to argue that it had some pretty impressive world building in regards to employing various folk tales and myths.

    Not to mention that CC’s Nephilim aren’t really the “descendants” of an angel, they’re just the results of some warlock’s experiments.

    Oh my god… Shadowhunters are just shitty, urban fantasy Witchers. Excuse me while I go grab enough hard booze to forget that particular epiphany.

    (Actually, I don’t – I know exactly why it was included. The reason is probably about as stupid as you think it is.)

    Oooh, oooh, let me try a guess. It is cause Romanian is vampiric official language? Because everyone who is a person of pop-culture knows that all vampires have Wallahian roots.

  2. Juracan on 10 February 2018, 19:38 said:

    YEAH IT’S FINALLY HERE!!!

    Love is a mortal sin, and the secrets of the past are deadly.

    I—what? What does this mean? I was as baffled as you are when I first saw this line, and no matter how many times I look at the sentence it still doesn’t make sense. And it’s written twice in the synopsis, which is just lazy.

    Then she gets into how everything in her world comes back to angels and demons. Now, I’m a straight, cis-gender, White guy, but even to me this feels like cultural appropriation. You’ve tried to cram creatures from many diverse cultures into your world, CC, and trying to tie them all into one a system based largely on Judeo-Christian belief is incredibly disrespectful, not to mention stupid. But then, you didn’t exactly show a ton of respect for these myths in the first place (ex: ifrits being magic-less warlocks with red skin, rather than powerful spirits made of fire).

    I’m not so much bugged by her putting this all into a Judeo-Christian belief system. I think there are ways to do that which tell a good story. What makes Clare’s writing so frustrating is that it’s done very lazily. And she goes on with the “all the myths are true” thing throughout the story, despite them plainly not being so. The ifrit example is the one that stuck out to me, and I’m glad you brought it up again. She takes all these broad ideas and fits them into the categories of “angels, demons, fairies, warlocks, vampires or werewolves.”

    And like, most people would put ‘ifrits’ in demons or something, and I’d make the argument that if you’re stuck with these classifications you could put them into ‘fairies.’ But instead she makes them red-skinned powerless warlocks? What?

    CC discusses how she came up with Shadowhunters being Nephilim. She fails to mention that Nephilim are only mentioned about three times in the Bible, that the term “sons of God” is never explained, and that the term is most often translated as “giants”. So the idea of them being half-angel, half-human is all pop culture. Not to mention that CC’s Nephilim aren’t really the “descendants” of an angel, they’re just the results of some warlock’s experiments.

    …eh? Yes, Nephilim are usually interpreted as giants, but the idea of the ‘songs of God’ being angels isn’t that new. It’s not canon in any major religion now, but it’s an old idea. The seventh chapter of the Book of Enoch explicitly has some angels deciding to take wives among humanity, and their children are monstrous giants. And that translation is from 1883. It’s not exactly pop culture.

    That being said the idea of them having uber magic powers, or being powerful like angels, is pretty pop culture. To be fair Clare gets it closer to most pop culture, in which Nephilim are the mixture of angel and demon (which is way off the mark).

    In any case, I thought it a bit weird that CC’s series used the term ‘Nephilim’ because the Shadowhunters…aren’t really. They’ve got angel blood, I guess, but it’s not from reproduction, it’s from experimentation. They’re not giant, or particularly tall either. Honestly, the whole ‘using runes from Raziel to get special abilities’ sounds more in line with (though not an exact match) apocryphal Hebrew folklore about Solomon, rather than anything having to do with the Nephilim.

    Honestly, it wouldn’t be a Cassandra Clare book without a pretentious, totally out of context quote.

    [sigh] I suppose it wouldn’t be. Then again, the entire series’s title is taken from a pretentious, out-of-context quote, so I should have guessed that we’d come back to this.

    Well that’s funny, since Dante’s Inferno not only is the exact title of an adaptation, but of an especially bad one. Namely a PS3 era slasher published by EA, which has Dante a crusader instead of a poet. And his journey though hell includes slaying hordes of demons with a giant scythe made from a spinal cord. I’ll freely admit never actually reading Divine Comedy, but what little I know about suggests that Dante’s Inferno isn’t a very faithful recreation…

    HA! No, it’s really not. It came out when I was really get into my Alighieri phase, so I had just read the entire poem. The thing is…wrong on many fundamental levels, but I do really like the general art style of Hell, even when it deviates from the classical mythological references of the poem, because it’s so weird and twisted and gross, which is exactly how Hell should be depicted, ya know?

    She should have takien some lessons from Mike Mignola. Juracan has mentioned some issues with Hellboy series, but it is hard to argue that it had some pretty impressive world building in regards to employing various folk tales and myths.

    Well some of it is really impressive. Then there’s other stuff that doesn’t…really have any explanation at all. Like Anansi, or the St. Leonard’s Dragon, or the yokai. And I think ultimately that’s fine and works in Mignola’s stories—you don’t have to explain everything in the story, especially when it comes to monsters and mysticism. How does it work? The reader doesn’t know, and that makes it all the more unsettling or strange. This is a problem a lot of writers fall into—explaining everything in a fantasy setting.

    It’s fantasy! It doesn’t need to be explained!

    I’m very much looking forward to reading the rest of this sporking.

  3. Apep on 10 February 2018, 22:30 said:

    I’ll freely admit never actually reading Divine Comedy, but what little I know about suggests that Dante’s Inferno isn’t a very faithful recreation…

    Not even remotely. Overly Sarcastic Productions did some videos summarizing each part, and in my totally unquestionable and not at all unqualified opinion, they are both accurate and entertaining. You can watch part one here.

    Shadowhunters are just shitty, urban fantasy Witchers. Excuse me while I go grab enough hard booze to forget that particular epiphany.

    Ah, damnit. And I like those books. I’ll try to console myself by telling myself that if Geralt ended up in Shadowhunter-land, he would kick the asses of the male Shadowhunters and probably end up having sex with at least half the women before he left.

    Oooh, oooh, let me try a guess. It is cause Romanian is vampiric official language? Because everyone who is a person of pop-culture knows that all vampires have Wallahian roots.

    Oh, if only. Then it might be mildly relevant to the plot. Which it’s not.

    I—what? What does this mean?

    Yeah. I don’t know. I think it’s there because (like a lot of weird lines and quotes in this series), someone thought it sounded “deep.”

    Yes, Nephilim are usually interpreted as giants, but the idea of the ‘songs of God’ being angels isn’t that new.

    Yes, but even that translation notes that the actual term in the original text more accurately translates as “Watchers”. What, exactly, were/are the “Watchers”? Angels? Maybe. Or they could be something else. We don’t know for sure. Personally, I think this (and a good bit of the early bits of the Old Testament) are remnants of pre-monotheistic Hebrew legends and myths.

    This is the problem with translating a several thousand year old transcription of an even older oral tradition from a society of bronze age, desert-dwelling shepherds.

    [sigh] I suppose it wouldn’t be.

    Oh, just you wait. We’ve only begun with the pretentious, out of context quotes.

  4. lilyWhite on 10 February 2018, 23:24 said:

    A cover like that really does scream “all you should care about in this novel is the smexy boy”.

    never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death.

    Judge Dredd is a Shadowhunter?

    Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.

    “This vampire kid doesn’t die in sunlight!” “Dear god, he could be more of a Gary-Stu than Jace!” “We mustn’t allow that!” “Yeah, let’s throw this kid who died thanks to our heroes’ negligence into jail for the crime of being a Downworlder!”

    Oh my god… Shadowhunters are just shitty, urban fantasy Witchers.

    That does explain the glorified bigotry of the Shadowhunters.

  5. The Smith of Lie on 11 February 2018, 06:50 said:

    “This vampire kid doesn’t die in sunlight!” “Dear god, he could be more of a Gary-Stu than Jace!” “We mustn’t allow that!” “Yeah, let’s throw this kid who died thanks to our heroes’ negligence into jail for the crime of being a Downworlder!”

    Well this actually reminds of a point that annoys me about “Simon is special daywalker vampire, hurr durr”. It probably is more of a sin of previous book, but I don’t remember complaining about it in those sporkings, so it can get a comment now.

    Why the hell is it not enough to make Simon a vampire, but a special snowflake vampire at that? I don’t like CC’s racism against her own species and a disdain towards mortals that is not so much subtext as super text, but this is going too far. So, Simon wasn’t good enough to be Clary’s love interest as a mundane, so he’s got turned into an undead abomination (because of course vampires are sexy and not monstrous…), he needs to be a super special undead abomination.

    That is not very interesting. Actually its opposite, because it kills potential source of conflict. Simon dealing with all the supernatural shit as a vanilla mortal? That’s interesting because he’s at power disadvantage and he needs to use his wits and may become a badass normal. Simon becoming a vampire? Takes away from a drama of human against supernatural, but at least the new limits inherent in being vampire (blood drinking, traditional vampiric weaknesses) creates a source of potential conflict and character developement as he learns to (un)live as undead abomination. And a lot of conflict is possible regarding his previous life – how to deal with parents and associates and so on.

    But CC just makes it easy and with a touch of Wand of Authorial Fiat +5 removes any tension out of situation. Which she than needs to somehow reintroduce with a contrived plot about Shadowhunters no longer liking them.

    That does explain the glorified bigotry of the Shadowhunters.

    Can you explain that point? I’m not sure I see the connection here. Unless it is that as a part of being shitty counterpart, the Shadowhunters are perpetuators of bigotry instead of targers?

  6. Aikaterini on 12 February 2018, 10:38 said:

    Yes, it’s finally here! I’m really excited. :)

    example, who exactly is this supposed to be on the cover? Is it Jace? Alec? Simon?

    Given that the boy is a brunet and that I’ve seen the alternate cover of this book, I think that he’s supposed to be Sebastian.

    Why should Jace’s opinion matter one whit in this instance? He’s not in charge of Clary.

    When has Jace not been the lord and master of this universe? When Clary wanted to check her house, Hodge, a grown man, told her that she could go if “Jace agreed to it.” Jace is the almighty dreamboat of this series, so everyone must defer to him. Even if it makes no sense.

    Of course the Shadowhunters would be suspicious of Simon

    So, let’s see, Simon has been constantly insulted and dismissed by his so-called best friend’s Shadowhunter friends, has been kidnapped and bitten by vampires because of their negligence, and now Shadowhunters have thrown him into prison.

    Why is he still hanging out with them again?

    This will be our first hint that CC intends to write another love-triangle plot into this book

    Proving without a doubt that the first love triangle between Clary, Jace, and Simon was completely pointless. Although I guess that we should be thankful that it hasn’t morphed into a love octagon like in “The Draco Trilogy.”

  7. The Smith of Lie on 12 February 2018, 13:49 said:

    So, let’s see, Simon has been constantly insulted and dismissed by his so-called best friend’s Shadowhunter friends, has been kidnapped and bitten by vampires because of their negligence, and now Shadowhunters have thrown him into prison.
    Why is he still hanging out with them again?

    Simon had had it with those Shadowhunter assholes. His adolescent feelings towards one Clary Fray made him bear with a lot of shit, but now he was done. Constant condescending remarks and dismissive attitude he could live with. The asshat that was Jayce he could withstand. Even the criminal negligence that led to his current vampiric state he could somehow deal with. But enough was enough.

    He slipped through the window of his room and down to the street. This ‘cunning’ stratagem was all he needed to outwit the Shadowhunters squad sent to arrest him. For supposed peacekeepers of supernatural world they were pretty incompetent. But that still left him a fugitive, without any allies or resources. He decided that this needed to change.

    He knew that getting help from local downworlders would be difficult. No one would want to cross the Shadowhunters without getting something in exchange. Luckily ever since he first got entangled with supernatural he’s been preparing for just such an emergency. He dialed the number and waited. “Yes?” gruff, male voice answered. “Hello, Mister Kincaid? I am looking for a bodyguard with certain experience in dealing with supernatural.”

    Stealing felt wrong, but Kincaid’s fees were few orders of magnitude higher than what he saved from his allowance. At least with being an undead abomination came a set of powers that made it physically, if not morally, easier. With Kincaid at his side Simon could start planning his next move. Some way to disrupt Shadowhunters’ operations in the city for long enough for him to disappear.

    Kincaid listened to Simon’s explanation of the situation. “Well, since they pretty much only have one base in the city now, after that Valentine guy destroyed their prison, I’d say the easiest way to deal with them is blow up the whole building, dose it with gasoline and then blow it up again.” Simon wanted to protest the Bolshevik Muppet solution, but a possibility of Jayce getting caught up in the blast occurred to him. “You know what? I like that idea. How do we go about arranging that?”

    Where an old church housing Shadowhunters headquarters once stood there was only a crater filled with embers. Simon was glad that Clary left for that whole City of Glass place before he and Kincaid went about executing their plan. He might have been over his infatuation, but that didn’t mean he wanted her dead. Unlike her brother, who hopefully was blown to smithereens along with everyone inside the building. “So, where to now?” His bodyguard asked. Contract held for few more days. “I’m not sure. Somewhere far away from here for sure…”

  8. Aikaterini on 12 February 2018, 15:06 said:

    Wow, I didn’t expect my comment to help generate a spitefic, but great! In fact, a new headcanon could be that your Simon is the real Simon, who escaped and has found a new life of freedom and happiness elsewhere, and the Simon who exists in this book is just a doppelganger that Kincaid created in order to fool everyone who didn’t die in the explosion.