So, here we are. I’ve finished sporking City of Glass, the third book of the Mortal Instruments series. And it’s been a trek, both getting through this book, and through the previous two.

First, let’s begin with my final thoughts on City of Glass

City of Glass

Honestly, I’m not entirely certain where to begin. So I guess I’ll go with what I usually do, and take a look at the counts.

Final Counts

Both Hands Ma’am: 84
Entirely Pointless: 21
Our “Heroes”: 84
Plot Hole: 17
Rapier Twit: 11
You Keep Using That Word: 157
Shoddy World Building: 33
No Shit Sherlock: 6
A Word From Our Sponsors: 11
Un-Logic: 15

Some of those are pretty high. I’m particularly bothered by how high the Our “Heroes” is.

Now, just for the sake of comparison, let’s look at the previous books.

Here’s the final counts for City of Bones (with some corrections to the names):

You Keep Using That Word: 110
Rapier Twit: 71
No Shit Sherlock: 48
Plot Hole: 89
A Word From Our Sponsors: 24
Both Hands, Ma’am: 32
Our “Heroes”: 26

And here’s the same from City of Ashes:

Entirely Pointless: 44
Un-Logic: 57
You Keep Using That Word: 92
Shoddy World Building: 43
Rapier Twit: 67
Our “Heroes”: 161
No Shit Sherlock: 16
Both Hands, Ma’am: 111
A Word from Our Sponsors: 12

So, one the one hand, CC got somewhat better about heaping praise on Jace/Clary and/or giving overly flattering descriptions of Jace. And she/her editor has gotten better at trimming details or plot points that served no purpose. Also, there’s a lot fewer instances of the protagonists engaging in bad behaviors that never get called out.

Well, either that, or I’ve just developed a tolerance for that stuff.

I’m also very pleased with the sharp decrease in characters trying to be “funny”, especially Jace.

So I’ll grant CC this much – she did improve as a writer between the publication of her first book and her third.

But given that her first book has a general vibe of being a work of fanfiction that got tweaked just enough to avoid copyright infringement, and that CC’s fanfic (while popular) was maybe not of the highest quality, that’s probably not saying a lot.

Now that that’s done, let’s get to the problems. And where better to begin, than where this all started – the blurb.

Love is a mortal sin, and the secrets of the past are deadly. Plunge into the third installment in the internationally bestselling Mortal Instruments series and “prepare to be hooked” (Entertainment Weekly).
To save her mother’s life, Clary must travel to the City of Glass, the ancestral home of the Shadowhunters—never mind that entering the city without permission is against the Law, and breaking the Law could mean death. To make things worse, she learns that Jace does not want her there, and Simon has been thrown in prison by the Shadowhunters, who are deeply suspicious of a vampire who can withstand sunlight.
As Clary uncovers more about her family’s past, she finds an ally in mysterious Shadowhunter Sebastian. With Valentine mustering the full force of his power to destroy all Shadowhunters forever, their only chance to defeat him is to fight alongside their eternal enemies. But can Downworlders and Shadowhunters put aside their hatred to work together? While Jace realizes exactly how much he’s willing to risk for Clary, can she harness her newfound powers to help save the Glass City—whatever the cost?
Love is a mortal sin and the secrets of the past prove deadly as Clary and Jace face down Valentine in the third installment of bestselling series the Mortal Instruments.

First point: Clary goes to Shadowhunter City to find a cure for her mom. This is true, technically speaking.

So, kudos for that.

Also, Jace doesn’t want her to come, and Simon gets thrown in prison.

But as far as consequences for sneaking in, I don’t recall any. I mean, the biggest issue for Clary getting there was that Luke was leading the way, and Shadowhunters didn’t approve of Downworlders coming in after dark.

The impression I get reading this is that there will be some conflict between Clary and Jace over whether she can go. We sort of get that, but it’s basically confined to the first chapter, with Jace trying to get Simon to trick Clary into arriving too late. By the time it might come up again, it’s too late to do anything about it.

Moving on, Clary does learn more about her family’s past, but most of that happens via info-dumps. She doesn’t go looking into this stuff on purpose, nor does she ever demonstrate an active interest in uncovering any of it.

Sebastian technically helps her out. Once. I can only assume he’s mentioned here to tease a possible love triangle plot.

Given the mention of Valentine getting ready to put his Evil Plan into action, as well as the Shadowhunters and Downworlders having to figure out how to work together, you’d expect more of this book to focus on that. Well, more than that one scene from Luke’s POV and the maybe two bits of Clary giving speeches.

The stuff about Jace figuring out “how much he’s willing to risk for Clary” is… eh? Like, was this ever really in doubt? I mean, by anyone not convinced that the only reason he does anything to help Clary is because it might help him get in her pants, that is.

And the same goes for whether or not Clary will “harness her newfound powers” to save the day. I mean, at no point in this series has she ever really struggled to make use of her powers. She’s never really put any effort into figuring out how they work, or what limitations they might have. And don’t try to claim that Clary’s dreams/visions count, because she never puts any thought or effort into figuring out if there’s any secret message in them.

Also, neither Clary nor Jace had to make any real sacrifices to win. No, I don’t consider Max’s death to count, because neither of them seem overly concerned about it. Hell, Isabelle has more of a reaction, and part of that involved having sex with Simon.

And at no point do any “secrets of the past” turn out to be “deadly”. I mean, I guess you could count the existence of Sebastian/Jonathan, but that’s not what I imagine when I hear a phrase like that. When I hear that kind of thing, I think more along the lines of a conspiracy thriller – information that puts people in danger simply by knowing it.

So all in all, I’d say the blurb isn’t a very accurate representation of the book’s contents. And while I understand that authors probably have as much say in what goes into the blurb as they do the cover, I do still expect the blurb to give a somewhat accurate depiction of what happens in the book.

And speaking of which, let’s dig into stuff that CC did have control over – the actual content of the book.

Now, I have quite a few problems with this book. I mean, look at the different counts. I’ve got dings for incesant and stupid terminology, bad world building, and a myriad of issues with the characters.

But really, all of that isn’t a big deal. I mean, all of that makes this book pretty bad, but the real problems are much deeper. And really, there’s two real, bone-deep problems with this book:

First, that it feels like the focus is on the wrong story. It seems like there’s a bigger, much more interesting, much more important story going on, and these characters are on the fringes of it.

Now, that’s not a terrible idea for a story. There’s a number of very good stories that are told largely, if not entirely, from the perspective of characters on its periphery, or who aren’t entirely aware of what’s going on. I mean, that’s basically the premise of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead as well as the first Black Company) book.

But the thing about those is, the intended audience is likely aware of the details of the larger plot from other works, or is familiar enough with the genre to extrapolate them. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern only works if you know the plot of Hamlet; and The Black Company only works if you’ve read Lord of the Rings.

We don’t have that here. We know that the Shadowhunter leadership is scrambling to figure out how to deal with Valentine. We know that, because the book starts with all the Shadowhunters – including the kids – being called to HQ to deal with the situation. So clearly this is a big issue.

And yet, we barely get to see any of that. We get a few glimpses and little details, mostly from Alec (who I can only assume, being the new kid, spent most of the sessions sitting there keeping his mouth shut), and one scene of Luke trying to get enough support together to get his proposal heard.

That’s it.

What do we get instead? Teenage soap opera dramatics on repeat.

Now some might point out that one of the series the CC pulled a lot of inspiration from – the Harry Potter books – did the same thing later on. But let’s dig into that, briefly.

In Order of the Phoenix, Harry is very much aware of the threat Voldemort represents. Heck, everyone is. And yes, that includes the Ministry of Magic – why else would they work so hard to keep that information away from the public? But more to the point, Harry wants to be involved in the fight against Voldemort. He wants to be induced into the Order.

It’s the adults in the Order that are keeping him out. They’re the ones keeping him in the dark. And that act, and the reasons behind it, form one of the major conflicts of the book.

In the following book, Half-Blood Prince, those obstacles aren’t there, or at least have been reduced. Yet still, Harry decides to go back to school, rather than drop out and join the fight. Why not? Because a Half-Blood Prince is about Harry getting taught as much as possible so that he can go fight Voldemort. It’s like if Luke’s training sequence on Dagobah in ESB was a novel. And because of all that, Harry’s in a much better position to confront Voldemort in the final book.

But that’s not the case with City of Glass. The characters who have the most reason to want to fight Valentine are shoved to the side and told to leave it to the adults. And I understand why – they are, for the most part, still minors in Shadowhunter society. I can understand that.

What I don’t understand is why they just accept it.

Why aren’t they pushing to at least talk to the full council? Why aren’t they trying to figure out Valentine’s plan? Why are they content to just sit there and leave everything to the adults?

It’s one thing to have protagonists be reacting to actions taken by the villain; it’s another when that’s all they do.

And because they have nothing to do, we get the stupid teen soap opera antics.

Which brings me to my other major gripe with this book:

The plot we do get is an Idiot Plot.

Just so much of it. Basically everything that happens up until Valentine decides to show up and start doing shit could be resolved in about 5 minutes if the characters weren’t all blithering idiots.

Jace not wanting Clary to come to Shadowhunter Land? Gee, maybe if Jace, I don’t know, talked to her, she’d understand. Or at least settle the issue.

Simon getting dragged to Shadowhunter City, and then being thrown in prison? Well, maybe it wouldn’t be resolved, but at the very least we could focus on that instead of just leaving him to languish.

And speaking of Simon, all the shit around keeping both him and Clary unaware of the other, and all the subsequent fallout? None of that would have happened if either A) Jace had figured out that Clary would probably respond better to him being honest with her, rather than trying to cover his own ass, or B) if anyone else had considered that Clary’s friend being in prison was just slightly more important than providing cover for Jace or whatever.

And don’t get me started on the whole Jace/Clary relationship mess. If Clary just slightly less concerned with who Jace is exchanging bodily fluids with – while under the impression that he’s her brother, I remind you – then maybe she would have learned about Simon from someone other than Sebastian/Jonathan, and thus we could have avoided all the crap from the above point.

Seriously. If just one person in this group didn’t act like an idiotic, overly-hormonal teenager, a good portion of the plot for the first third of this book wouldn’t have happened. Now I understand that there are certain expectations for the length of books, but when the driving force behind a third or so of a book’s length requires the characters to act like idiots? That’s all on the author.

But, to complete the praise-criticism-praise sandwich, I will admit this: I think there’s at least the germ of a good idea in here – namely the “trying to get the Shadowhunters and Downworlders to work together” plot. If the book had focused more on that, maybe with a dash of “Valentine loyalists working to undermine peace efforts”, this could have been really good.

And I think that’s about all I have to say about City of Glass in particular. So let’s move on to the three books as a whole.

Mortal Instruments series

Looking back at some of my earlier sporkings, I can say that I might have been unduly harsh in some cases. I mean, I literally started my introduction to the first book by calling it “crap.” The only defense I can offer is that I had little to no experience sporking, so I decided to go for the cheap jokes. And that’s not fair.

So no, I think it’s a bit much to call this series “crap.”

But I also don’t think it’s an entirely inaccurate statement, either. I mean, there’s a reason some of those counts exist, after all.

I’m having a bit of trouble organizing my thoughts, so I think I’ll try going through the major characters, and their “arcs” or lack thereof.

Clary: Clary was probably intended to be seen in CoB as a “typical” teenage girl, likely similar to the intended audience, to make it easy for them to identify with her; she’s “artistic”, she’s “not popular”, she’s into geeky stuff like anime and comic books. Again, probably a lot like the books’ target audience.

But beyond that? There’s not a whole lot to her. She’s kind of a blank slate. Admittedly, not as much of a blank slate as the protagonist of certain other YA series, but still. And as such, she doesn’t really change all that much over the three books.

What exactly is Clary’s character arc? I mean, is it about finding confidence in herself? I mean, there was that bit in the later chapters about Jace always believing in her or whatever, but Clary never really seemed to need help making her thoughts or opinions known.

Case in point: in chapter two of CoB, Clary had no problem whatsoever telling Simon – her best/only friend – that she wanted to bail on poetry night at that coffee shop, even though Simon was there to support one of his friends. The only time she seems to have any trouble asserting herself is when it comes to Jace.

Okay, so if it’s not that, maybe it’s about finding family, or acceptance, or something? Well, again, was that really a problem for her? I mean, yes, Clary is presented as being someone on the fringes of teen society (see: not popular, lack of friends), but that’s never really presented as a problem. Mostly because we never really see her in a situation where she has to interact with mundanes, other than Simon.

I mean, there’s a reason the first few chapters of the early Harry Potter books (especially the first one) dealt with his life with the Dursleys – it’s to establish just how different his life at Hogwarts is compared to his life at “home.”

So really, Clary’s arc seems to be: normal, totally identifiable teenage girl finds out she’s actually super special, ends up with dream boyfriend and never has to go back to stupid high school.

Her “arc” is basically a wish fulfillment fantasy for the target audience. Which is fine for, say, a work of fanfiction. Not so much for a novel, let alone a series of novels.

Jace: If Clary has almost no arc, Jace seems to have even less. He starts out as a conceited, sarcastic asshole in the first book, continues to be a conceited, sarcastic asshole in the second, and ends the third as a conceited, sarcastic asshole.

Now, CC might try to present Jace as being deeper than that, especially in the scenes from his POV. I’m sure she wants to give the impression that Jace is conflicted about stuff, but how conflicted is he, really?

I mean, there’s the “my dad is actually the bad guy” stuff, but this doesn’t really seem to be something Jace struggles with. Any issues that arise from that seem to largely be external, rather than internal. At no point does Jace stop and reflect on things Valentine might have taught him, things he considered fundamental truths or whatever, and wonder if they might be wrong. Nor does he struggle to reconcile the fact that the man he knew as his father and the guy he’d been taught was the Greatest Villain Ever happen to be the same man. He just accepts it, and then moves on, like it’s no big deal.

There is some internal conflict over his relationship with Clary. Some. Mostly in the vein of “I’m really attracted to her… but I shouldn’t be… but I am… but I shouldn’t be…” And to his credit, he does try to address this. Kinda. In one book. For a little while. And then in this book, after spending maybe five minutes in Clary’s presence, decides “fuck it.”

And then CC pulls a solution out of nowhere, so that little conflict is nicely resolved, with no real consequences.

Simon: Oh, Simon. Man, you got done dirty. Simon is, at least in my opinion, the most interesting character, not to mention the most well developed. I mean, he’s pretty much the only character who seems to have a life outside the confines of what’s on the page. Yes, that’s mostly confined to anecdotes about the band he’s in, which seem to exist largely to serve as jokes, but it’s something.

I’ll admit, Simon doesn’t really have much of an arc, either, but that’s balanced somewhat by him being, you know, interesting. Honestly, I think the biggest mistake with Simon was making him a vampire; as a regular person who happens to get dragged into all this supernatural stuff, he could provide an interesting perspective on all this stuff. If the group were the Scooby Gang from Buffy:tVS, Simon would be Xander.

More importantly, Simon could serve as the connection/temptation of a normal life for Clary. A nice metaphor for everything she might lose by embracing being a Shadowhunter. But no, we have to make him a vampire, and a special one at that, so Clary can go on to live her perfect dream life, with no consequences.

Alec & Isabelle: I’m lumping the Lightwood siblings together, because A) they’re really more secondary than primary, and B) I don’t have quite as much to say about them, largely due to point A.

I don’t want to call Alec the “token gay character”, but that kinda seems to be the whole point of his existence. I mean, he’s maybe kinda supposed to be the “older, mature” one of the group, but that only kinda comes up a little in the second book, and in the third is mostly a way to keep everyone else up-to-date on what’s going on with the adults (aka the actual plot of the book).

But beyond that? He’s “the gay one.” His whole plot arc over the three books is all about him being gay. And there’s two facets to this arc: the first is accepting that, no, Jace isn’t secretly gay or bi, so he’s never going to be into you, Alec; the second is dealing with him coming out to his parents.

And both of these are easily resolved: the former, by having him hook up with Magnus, who is apparently the only other non-straight character in the series; and the latter by… uh…. Just disappearing. Almost like it was just there to cause drama.

As for Isabelle, she seems to exist mostly to serve as a foil for Clary. The “sexy”, “confident”, “popular” girl who can serve as Clary’s best gal-pal or rival, depending on the needs of the plot. Again, to go with the Buffy:tVS comparison, she’s the Cordellia of the group.

But she’s also there to serve as something of an acceptable female target, presumably a stand-in for the girls the target audience views as potential rivals. Clary is clearly attractive, but she’s the “good” kind of attractive, the “hot, but doesn’t know it” attractive. Isabelle, on the other hand, knows she’s attractive, and this is bad. But she’s also strangely jealous of Clary for… some reason. Because having her not care would make treating her as a rival to Clary would be ceding the higher ground to her.

Further, while Clary isn’t presented as super-feminie compared to Isabelle, Isabelle isn’t allowed to excel at “feminine arts” either. This only comes up a few times, and is mostly treated as a joke, but still, the whole “lol, Isabelle is a terrible cook” joke feels so… mean spirited. And I feel it’s especially galling because it’s very similar to Simon’s band – it’s proof that these characters have a life and interests that extend beyond the page.

And honestly, while I like the idea of Simon and Isabelle hooking up, flipping the rest of the cast the bird, and going off on their own adventures, I can’t ignore how it’s a bit cringy that Isabelle is kinda treated as a “consolation prize” for Simon: sorry, you can’t get the ultimate amazement that is Clary, so here’s the hot chick instead.

And that’s about it as far as major or semi-major characters go. CC might try to make Magnus seem vaguely anti-hero like, to be the token evil-ish team mate, but really, he’s pretty much there to help with whatever problem the main cast has, or to facilitate Alec’s gay angst. I mean, even in this book, when he’s back to being kinda suspicious and acting on his own motives, it’s mostly to resolve the issue of Clary’s mom being in a coma.

Maia had the potential to be interesting, being a Downwolder that didn’t have an established relationship with the Shadowhunters. She could have provided a different view of them, one that wasn’t quite so flattering, and even could have established how the relationship between Shadowhunters working “in the field” differed from that of those in Shadowhunter Land, something CC claimed existed, but never really demonstrated. As is, she serves as a POV for one scene to watch Jace start a bar brawl because his feeeelings are hurt.

(No, I’m still not over that. Probably never will be)

Luke and Jocelyn are virtual non-entities. Luke mostly exists as an excuse to use the werewolves the same way Tolkien used the eagles. Jocelyn is literally absent for all but a handful of chapters over three books.

And if those two are virtual non-entities, the Lightwood parents are even worse. I’ll give CC credit for having Mama Lightwood be the one in charge, but we only see her exercise that authority maybe twice, first to kick Jace out, then to go rescue him. And I don’t even remember what her husband’s name is.

So yeah, not a lot of character development over these three books. But what about themes?

Honestly, I don’t feel like there are any themes in these books, at least, not intentional themes. Which, to be fair, is fine. Not every book or series has to have some “deep truth” that it’s trying to convey, or some message about life.

Now, there probably are some unintentional themes or messages. Like, “casual racism is okay, so long as the person doing it is hot enough.” And, “the most important relationships are romantic ones, even more so than familial or platonic.” But again, I’m willing to grant CC enough reasonable doubt to assume that those are unintentional.

But, just like with discussing the book, I am going to try and end with some positive comments.

First, these are certainly not the worst works of fiction out there. Frustrating, annoying, and infuriating at times? Sure. But they’re not actively trying to push a bad message, and they’re not just thousands of words of author wish fulfilment.

The basic premise isn’t a terrible one. The execution could have used some work, but the idea was workable. I mean, there’s plenty of series that have done something similar.

And despite all my complaints, I don’t think CC is a terrible writer. I think she probably has some decent writing chops, and had she gotten some decent feedback and taken time to hone her skills, could have improved. Going with the ranking system Stephen King discusses in his writing book/autobiography On Writing, I’d say CC is probably firmly in the second rank of writers – meaning that, with work, she could improve, and rise up to the third rank.

I know for a fact that CC can write well. She can be funny.

But personally, I think the problem is that she had so much success when writing fan fiction (deserved or otherwise) that she decided that was good enough. The problem, though, is that the pool of fanfiction writers is so big, and there are no controls for quality, that the bar for what counts as “good” is relatively low. To be clear, I’m not saying that all fanfiction is bad, or of poor quality.

And to get back on track, I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that this series clearly found an audience. Because in addition to these three books, CC has published not only three direct sequels, but also a sequel trilogy, a prequel trilogy, a spin-off trilogy, and most recently, a sequel trilogy to the prequel trilogy.

That’s a lot of books.

So if nothing else, CC managed to find a niche, and has successfully managed to exploit it for all its worth. She wouldn’t be the first author to make a career out of writing mostly one series. If anything, I kinda wonder if she regrets this on some level; she’s gotten so big based on this one property that she’s kinda stuck working on it. Kinda like how J.K. Rowling is basically stuck writing Harry Potter stuff.

The Past, and the Future

And while we’re here, I think it’s only right that I take a moment to reflect on my own journey, and what I plan to do from here.

I posted my first entry sporking this series in late September of 2012. As I write this, it’s almost the end of April of 2020.

I’ve been sporking these books off and on for the better part of a decade.

That’s a long time. I’ve come a long way from then.

When I started this, I was in a different place than I am now. I was over a year out of college, had quit my first job a few months earlier, and about a month before had gone to the funeral of my grandmother.

Since then, I’ve had and been fired from another job; applied for and finished grad school; and I’ve gotten another job.

I’ve gone from having vague hopes of someday getting paid to write fiction to seeing my work in print several times.

I’d like to think I’ve grown since then, both as a writer and as a person.

And for all that, sporking these books has been a part of that.

There have been times where I got tired of it. Times when I got frustrated, both with this project, and with my lack of progress on it. Times when I’d think, “why am I working on this, when I could be working on something else? Something that might actually help me in achieving my own goals?”

And that’s been a tough question to answer at times.

Part of the reason I’ve been more regular with getting sporkings out is because I felt obligated to do so – I started sporking this book/series, and I’ll be damned if I’m going to give up before I’ve finished it.

And now I’m sitting here, and I have.

So… what now?

I’ve said, or at least implied, that this would be the last book I sporked. And from a certain perspective, it makes sense: this is the end of this story arc, it’s a good place to bow out.

But, after the last few sporkings, I’ve been thinking about that decision. I mean, this stuff has been a part of my life for a while now. Do I really want to just stop now?

And the answer is…

… I don’t know.

I mean, I do want to put more of my free time and energy towards my own writing and developing my career, but I have to admit, I have had some fun with the sporkings so far.

So I guess what I’m saying is, I’m going to think about whether I’m going to continue or not. I’m going to take some time to work on my own stuff, probably write up some reviews/recommendations for books I actually like.

But if I do decide to do some more sporkings, you’ll all be the first ones to know.

So for now, I guess I’ll see you guys when I see you. Until then.

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Comment

  1. Moldorm on 28 April 2020, 08:40 said:

    Thank you for your work! It’s been great fun following your progress.

    All the best, and whatever you do next you’ll always have an audience here :)

  2. Juracan on 29 April 2020, 11:32 said:

    First, that it feels like the focus is on the wrong story. It seems like there’s a bigger, much more interesting, much more important story going on, and these characters are on the fringes of it.

    Now, that’s not a terrible idea for a story. There’s a number of very good stories that are told largely, if not entirely, from the perspective of characters on its periphery, or who aren’t entirely aware of what’s going on. I mean, that’s basically the premise of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead as well as the first Black Company) book.

    But the thing about those is, the intended audience is likely aware of the details of the larger plot from other works, or is familiar enough with the genre to extrapolate them. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern only works if you know the plot of Hamlet; and The Black Company only works if you’ve read Lord of the Rings.

    We don’t have that here. We know that the Shadowhunter leadership is scrambling to figure out how to deal with Valentine. We know that, because the book starts with all the Shadowhunters – including the kids – being called to HQ to deal with the situation. So clearly this is a big issue.

    And yet, we barely get to see any of that. We get a few glimpses and little details, mostly from Alec (who I can only assume, being the new kid, spent most of the sessions sitting there keeping his mouth shut), and one scene of Luke trying to get enough support together to get his proposal heard.

    That’s it.

    What do we get instead? Teenage soap opera dramatics on repeat.

    This is the main complaint I’ve seen from readers of the story, even from those who call themselves fans. I remember a conversation with a few friends who had read the trilogy, and they said while they liked the world that CC had set up, they were bothered by the excessive focus on the melodrama. And this last book makes it feel like it’s a bigger problem than usual, because this, by all accounts, the end of the trilogy and the one where everything should be wrapping up with epic conclusions.

    And instead… teen drama.

    If Clary has almost no arc, Jace seems to have even less. He starts out as a conceited, sarcastic asshole in the first book, continues to be a conceited, sarcastic asshole in the second, and ends the third as a conceited, sarcastic asshole.

    [sarcasm] But he’s HAWT so does it matter?

    I know I’ve probably mentioned this before, but I remember years ago seeing crossover fanart of different YA protagonists hanging out, with Jace among them, but I was like, “No?? These other guys would probably at best avoid hanging out with a guy who is that transparent a douchebag? At worst they’d slug him in the face???”

    Would you argue that Jace is more the protagonist than Clary is? I recall seeing this theory before, but you do point out that he has less of an arc than Clary does.

    As is, she serves as a POV for one scene to watch Jace start a bar brawl because his feeeelings are hurt.

    (No, I’m still not over that. Probably never will be)

    And you shouldn’t get over it, because it’s terrible. I don’t like getting political, but it’s a bit like if a New York City cop went and started beating the snot out of a room full of minorities, and it’s played for his sympathy. Here’s a group that historically has reason not to like the people enforcing their laws/throwing their power around, coming in and beating them for the sake of letting off steam.

    And to get back on track, I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that this series clearly found an audience. Because in addition to these three books, CC has published not only three direct sequels, but also a sequel trilogy, a prequel trilogy, a spin-off trilogy, and most recently, a sequel trilogy to the prequel trilogy.

    Holy shiz that’s a lot of books. I’d lost track a few years ago.

    So for now, I guess I’ll see you guys when I see you.

    Good luck on future endeavors, Apep! May you find plenty of books that you’ll actually enjoy reading.

  3. mineralica on 29 April 2020, 15:46 said:

    Long time reader here, just popping up to wish you all the best.

    Speaking of passage of time, message at main page gets more humorous each time I see it.

  4. techwithgeeks on 2 June 2020, 09:30 said:

    In our fast changing world, technology is essential towards the execution of various tasks, which are impossible to be carried out without the power of science and electronics.

  5. talesbuzz on 2 June 2020, 09:35 said:

    Nice post Thanks for share Article.

  6. random on 30 July 2020, 14:19 said:

    just wanted to say I’ve followed ur sporks fo a long time now (can’t believe the year, wow!) but just wanted to say well done on getting to the end of the tunnel- best of luck in your future endeavors! :)