Hey, everybody. Sorry it’s been so long between sporkings. Once again, I was visited by the “I really don’t feel like doing this” fairy, and that bitch just never leaves when asked. So consider this me evicting her from the premises.

So, last time, we had much filler. Jace and Simon talked about… stuff, I guess, while Clary and Luke managed to sneak into the surprisingly poorly guarded city of the Shadowhunters. And it all ended with Alec telling Simon to come with him to Shadowhunter HQ, so he can go back home.

But before we begin, let’s take a look at that chapter title, shall we? “Daylighter,” eh? Gee, can’t imagine what that’s referring to. But I guess Daywalker was already taken, so why not go with a cheap knock-off, am I right?

So we pick up almost right where we left off, with Alec escorting Simon to the Shadowhunter’s town hall or whatever. And I will note a few things that I like:

-First, the streets of the city aren’t nice and wide, and laid down in a grid. They’re narrow, and twisted, as would be expected from an older, medieval European city.
-Second, some small changes that Simon’s only noticing now, namely that he’s not bothered by the cold weather, and that he’s having no trouble keeping up with Alec. They’re little differences, but it’s nice to see them.

Simon tries starting up some light conversation, pointing out how it kinda sucks that Alec’s stuck escorting him around, but Alec takes it in stride. And we learn a bit about the Shadowhunter government, namely that there is an officer known as the Consul. And what does the Consul do?

“He counts the votes of the Council, interprets the Law for the Clave, and advises them and the Inquisitor. If you head up an Institute and you run into a problem you don’t know how to deal with, you call the Consul.”

Um… I don’t think CC knows what a consul actually does. I’m betting she saw that ‘consul’ and ‘council’ were related terms, and decided a consul must be someone who councils people.

And honestly, this job sounds really, really shitty.

Also, this

You Keep Using That Word: 2 (“Law” and “Institute”)

Simon’s confused about the mention of advising the Inquisitor, what with the Inquisitor being dead and all. Guess it’s his turn to carry the idiot-ball. So Alec explains that Inquisitor is a job, and with the last one dead, there’s now a new one – Inquisitor Aldertree.

Two things:

No Shit Sherlock: 1

Because seriously, who actually needed that explained? And this

Shoddy World Building: 1

Do I even have to explain this?

Simon makes a… joke (?) about the Spanish Inquisition for some reason:

“I’ll tell you, inquisitions haven’t worked out well for my people in the past.”

I… I just… why?

Rapier Twit: 1

When Alec doesn’t laugh (not really surprising), Simon covers it by saying it’s mundane history, so whatever. Then, for some reason, Alec reassures him that, hey, he’s not a mundane anymore – he’s a Downworlder! And this somehow makes him more interesting! Especially to people like Sebastian and Aline.

Our “Heroes”: 1

Because even back-handed racism is still racism.

Simon then asks about Sebastian and Isabelle, which amuses Alec, because apparently Isabelle only goes for “thoroughly inappropriate boys” which include mundanes, Downworlders, and “petty crooks”. Why does she do this? Well, Alec thinks it’s because she wants attention, but Simon has another theory, and we gets some actual humor:

bq “Or maybe she’s trying to take attention off you,” Simon said, almost absently. “You know, since your parents don’t know you’re gay and all.”
Alec stopped in the middle of the road so suddenly that Simon almost crashed into him. “No,” he said, “but apparently everyone else does.”

Simon points out that Jace probably doesn’t know, which Alec takes as a possible threat. This leads to Simon pointing out how Alec really doesn’t seem to like him (and bringing up the whole “I saved your life” bit), and they don’t have much in common, except for both having feelings for childhood friends.

Alec asks if Simon thinks he should tell Jace about his feelings, since Simon told Clary about his own feelings, and Simon advises against it, because it’s made things even more awkward, and he wonders if they can ever go back to being friends. By which I assume he means Clary deciding to go back to using him as her emotional crutch, because what they have is hardly what I’d call a friendship.

Instead, Simon advises he hook up with Magnus, because… he’s the only other member of the cast above a 2 on the Kinsey scale? I don’t know.

But oh noes, we have some drama there – Magnus didn’t talk to Alec much back in New York before they left, so clearly he doesn’t like Alec. I mean, it’s not like revealing their relationship might cause problems for one or both of them. No, clearly this is the only possible explanation.

Simon says Alec should call Magnus, but there are no phones in Shadowhunter Land.

And now that we’ve had the dialogue cut scene, they arrive at their destination.

Quick aside: why did we even have this discussion? I mean, I get why it’s between these two characters – Simon spelled it out quite clearly. But why now? I’d think they’d both have other things on their minds right now.

But I suppose the answer is pretty obvious – for CC, the actual ‘plot’ of these books is entirely secondary to all the relationship drama. I feel like she should just drop the paranormal/ urban fantasy stuff altogether and just write some YA Romance novels instead.

So now that they’ve reached Shadowhunter HQ, we get a description of it. Again, the description is fine, though I do have to wonder about Simon’s thoughts on the statues flanking the gate – they’re angels (big surprise there) holding swords, standing over creatures described as “a mixture of rat, bat, and lizard, with nasty pointed teeth,” which Simon figures are supposed to be demons but, “could just as easily be vampires.”

Uh… why? Correct me if I’m wrong, but did we ever establish if vampires in this setting are even capable of changing shape? And even so, only two of those three critters are really associated with vampires.

Anyway, they walk in, and are eventually met by some guy who shines a light in their faces. And here’s Simon’s response to his eyes tearing up:

Witchlight, he thought, angel light, burns me. I suppose it’s no surprise.

What.

Okay, I’ve tried for several minutes to get my thoughts out about this, but it just devolves into ranting again about CC’s poor decision to try to have a cosmology based on Judeo-Christian beliefs, while also stripping out important aspects like Heaven, Hell, God, etc – aspects that are kinda critical to said cosmology. But this is taking long enough, so we’re just going to move on.

Besides, I see no logical reason that Simon’s eyes aren’t tearing up because some asshole is shining a bright light in his eyes.

Turns out said asshole is Malachi Dieudonné, the Consul. And while I applaud CC for finally giving a character a surname appropriate to the region, I still have to wonder why his first name is “Malachi”. It can’t be because Shadowhunters have some fondness for Biblical names or whatever.

(Side note: I just looked up “Valentine” on Behind the Name, and one of the tags was “Shadowhunters characters.” I want to stab something so much right now.)

Malachi is brusque with Simon, calling him “Downworlder,” but I’m willing to let that slide, partly because they’ve just met and partly for… other reasons you’ll see shortly. Anyway, they’re sending Simon back, and surprisingly, Alec asks for some more details – will Simon be going directly to Manhattan, will someone be there to meet him, stuff that someone actually concerned about another person’s safety might ask.

Malachi says Magnus will be there, since it’s kind of his fault that Simon’s here in the first place. This leads to an argument between Alec and Malachi, in which the Consul is kind of an ass, because CC has trouble writing reasonable authority figures.

Also, I should get this down quick, before we move on:

You Keep Using That Word: 4 (“Portal” x 2)

Then some other guy shows up and tells Malachi to stop being an ass. The new guy is Inquisitor Aldertree, and he’s actually pretty friendly and reasonable. He’s also described as being “a small, round man,” which is not the description I’d expect for someone whose supposed to be the chief enforcement officer. Which kind of implies that his appointment was politically-motivated.

It also doesn’t help that, while he actually calls Simon by name and shakes his hand, his grip is described as “unpleasantly moist and clammy.” Even when trying to be subtle, CC fails miserably. And yes, I did note this the first time through.

Aldertree tells Alec he can leave, and takes Simon off, despite Alec’s protests. End scene.

And we switch over to Clary. She’s still tripping balls, but has come down enough to be somewhat aware of her surroundings. Not so much that she isn’t still a literal burden on those around her, though.

Luke explains to Amatis what happened, and Clary gets carried to the kitchen. Luke pulls out a bunch of herbs and tells Amatis to boil them. Why is he the one doing this? Didn’t we come to her for help?

(Fun face: two of the three herbs Luke pulls out are toxic. So this will surely go well.)

Amatis starts asking Luke some questions, but then Clary has a vision (possibly drug-induced, but with this series, who knows). She sees angels walking on the surface of Lake Lyn, and of course they all have Jace’s face.

Both Hands, Ma’am: 1

But again, despite having this crazy hallucination, Clary can still hear what Luke and Amatis are saying, because reasons. Amatis suggests they contact Jace, but Luke says no for… reasons.

Then Clary goes way under, has some more weird dream/vision/clunky foreshadowing, and comes to with Luke trying to force her to drink some strange concoction. After swallowing only a few drops, she’s magically better. And there’s just enough time left before the scene break to get out the following information:

Amatis is Luke’s sister. And apparently the only characteristics they share are eye color. Because why would siblings have other similarities, such as facial structure.

Anyway, end very short scene.

Back to Simon. He’s being lead down a hall by Aldertree. Apparently, Simon can smell people’s moods now. Here’s the description of Aldertree’s:

The Inquisitor stank of something bitter and strong as coffee, but much more unpleasant.

Um… okay. What does that even mean?

Also, yet more of that classic CC non-subtle foreshadowing.

More walking. They go past an open door, where some folks are discussing Valentine’s activities. Apparently he managed to complete the Ritual he was doing in the last book, meaning the heroes accomplished exactly nothing. Also, this:

You Keep Using That Word: 5 (“Ritual” – note the caps)

There’s some arguing, but Aldertree drags Simon off, eventually reaching a big, mostly empty room. There’s mention of a tapestry depicting an angel coming out of a lake, holding a sword and a cup.

Seriously, I think The Da Vinci Code was more cleaver than this. At least the clues to the big twist there weren’t quite so blatantly obvious.

Aldertree locks the door behind them, so we’re well past hinting with him. He practically has a flashing neon sign above his head.

When Simon asks about the Portal

You Keep Using That Word: 6

Aldertree says he wants to ask Simon some questions. We learn that Simon’s been a vampire for about two weeks, once again establishing just how little time passes between these books. Simon also doesn’t know who Turned him, which is apparently an issue.

I’ve got an issue, too – all this Random Capitalization.

You Keep Using That Word: 7

The move on to why the vampires didn’t just kill Simon, since technically they could have. But for some reason, Simon decides to play coy about it. Also, we get a few more of these:

You Keep Using That Word: 10 (“Institute,” “Law,” and “Turned”)

At this point, Simon basically stops cooperating, so Aldertree calls in some thugs to drag him off. And, once again, another few of these are tossed in:

You Keep Using That Word: 12 (“Portal” x 2)

Simon gets thrown into a dungeon. There’s an actual clever bit of world-building, or at least some cleverness on display – among the various runes and whatnot on the walls of his cell, the doorknob has what I assume is the Seal of Solomon on it. Which burns Simon’s hand when he touches it, because he’s Jewish.

How do we know it’s the Seal of Solomon? Because the guy in the next cell over tells him.

Unfortunately, as nice as this little detail is, it only draws attention to the lack of similar details in previous works.

Shoddy World Building: 2

Also, mystery neighbor calls Simon “Daylighter,” and apparently the guards have been planning for this all day. Simon argues that people will notice if he’s gone, including his teachers. But I doubt it, given that these books seem to be set in some kind of endless summer break.

There’s bits about Shadowhunters Disappearing people, namely Downworlders. Because I guess CC had to work extra hard to make these guys unsavory, given how cuddly her main protagonists are.

Anyway, Simon takes a closer look at his cell, and realizes that among the Shadowhunter runes are Stars of David and bits of the Torah in Hebrew. And they’re fresh.

Again, this is a nice bit of though on the guards’ part. But on recollection, didn’t Raphael wear a cross without it burning him? So, why does this work?

Shoddy World Building: 3

I’m not asking for detailed rules – just consistency.

Realizing just how screwed he is, Simon sits down on the bed to have a bit of a break-down. End scene.

Last scene of the chapter. And we’re in Alec’s POV, of all things.

He gets back to the Penhallows’ place, and finds Jace waiting outside. Jace is his usual pissy self, and gets really miffed about Alec leaving Simon with the Inquisitor. Why? Because the last one “exceeded her command” and totally would have been fired if she hadn’t died.

Okay, dude, all the nastiness she did was directed exclusively at you, and not without reason. And of course Jace shows not even the slightest hint of remorse about her death, because she was mean to him.

Alec and Jace argue a bit about the Clave, because again, CC cannot bear the thought of Jace not being entirely right. But Alec does score one point:

“Maybe,” Alec said, “but if you start thinking you know better than the Clave and better than the Law, what makes you any better than the Inquisitor? Or Valentine?”

Which is a very good point, even if I have to ding it.

You Keep Using That Word: 13

Unfortunately, this makes Jace mad, so Alec apologizes. Because Jace is a petulant toddler, and must be appeased at all times.

Isabelle pops up to scold them both for a bit, and Jace goes inside. Alec thinks back to what Simon said about his relationship with Clary, and then thinks about Magnus (though for some reason CC doesn’t just come out and say that, because tension or something).

Then Simon pulls out a notebook he has for… some reason, writes something on it, and sets it on fire with his not-wand. End chapter.

Counts

Both Hands, Ma’am: 1 (Total: 10)
Entirely Pointless: 0 (Total: 3)
Our “Heroes”: 1 (Total: 31)
Plot Hole: 0 (Total: 4)
Rapier Twit: 1 (Total: 1)
You Keep Using That Word: 13 (Total: 69)
Shoddy World Building: 3 (Total: 10)
No Shit Sherlock: 1( Total: 1)

Tagged as: ,

Comment

  1. The Smith of Lie on 1 August 2018, 05:31 said:

    New chapter from Apep, huzzah!

    But before we begin, let’s take a look at that chapter title, shall we? “Daylighter,” eh? Gee, can’t imagine what that’s referring to. But I guess Daywalker was already taken, so why not go with a cheap knock-off, am I right?

    Given the use of word moonlighting and the noun that one can create from it – moonlighter, I am choosing to understand ‘daylighter’ as meaning: someone who is part of supernatural world, often being a non-human or semi-human supernatural creature, but holds a respectable, public job despite this.

    Um… I don’t think CC knows what a consul actually does. I’m betting she saw that ‘consul’ and ‘council’ were related terms, and decided a consul must be someone who councils people.

    I’m willing to cut her some slack on this one. Modern use of the word is completely different, but given the historic use and the role of Consuls in Rome, I’d say it isn’t half-bad as a choice to name your primary magistrate.

    Simon makes a… joke (?) about the Spanish Inquisition for some reason:

    I didn’t expect that.

    Simon says Alec should call Magnus, but there are no phones in Shadowhunter Land.

    Obviously what Alec should have done here is to send a text message via carrier pigeon.

    Besides, I see no logical reason that Simon’s eyes aren’t tearing up because some asshole is shining a bright light in his eyes.

    There is a way that unusually strong, negative reaction for having a light shone into his eyes could be result and Simon being a vampire without all the mythological background. Given that usually vampires are nocturnal and are supposed to be predators, logic would dictate that they have some ways of navigating in the dark. So how about extremely photosensitive eyes, to better see their hapless victims in the dim light of the moon? This would also make for a nice, fitting weakness when fighting them – strong enough flashlights or even flash-bangs could feasibly cause a physical pain or at least great deal of discomfort for a vampire.

    Then some other guy shows up and tells Malachi to stop being an ass. The new guy is Inquisitor Aldertree, and he’s actually pretty friendly and reasonable. He’s also described as being “a small, round man,” which is not the description I’d expect for someone whose supposed to be the chief enforcement officer. Which kind of implies that his appointment was politically-motivated.

    If I was given to extending CC benefit of the doubt, I’d suggest that maybe he has a brilliant intellect and is a kind of Poirot character. That’d also depend on whether Inquisitor is more of an investigative function or more of a field work one.

    It also doesn’t help that, while he actually calls Simon by name and shakes his hand, his grip is described as “unpleasantly moist and clammy.” Even when trying to be subtle, CC fails miserably. And yes, I did note this the first time through.

    See? That’s why I’m not given to extending benefit of the doubt as far as those books are concerned. It took Apep a whole one paragraph to destroy the possible, kind interpretation I came up with.

    And we switch over to Clary. She’s still tripping balls, but has come down enough to be somewhat aware of her surroundings. Not so much that she isn’t still a literal burden on those around her, though.

    Oh please, she could be completely sober and in the peak physical condition and she’d still be a literal burden on those around her.

    (Fun face: two of the three herbs Luke pulls out are toxic. So this will surely go well.)

    If by “go well” we understand “Clary will die and a new, working protagonist will be issued and delivered within 14 days”…

    The Inquisitor stank of something bitter and strong as coffee, but much more unpleasant.

    I for one choose to interpret this as meaning that he carried the smell of Klatchian Coffee he just drank and was therefore in the state of Knurd.

    More walking. They go past an open door, where some folks are discussing Valentine’s activities. Apparently he managed to complete the Ritual he was doing in the last book, meaning the heroes accomplished exactly nothing.

    Is it ever clarified whether that is because he finished it despite the whole climactic battle or did he, in uncommon fit of common sense, just try again at some other location once he escaped with all McGuffins still in hand?

    Simon also doesn’t know who Turned him, which is apparently an issue.

    Of course it is an issue. Now they need to fill out all those adoption papers and find him new vampire parents…

    Unfortunately, as nice as this little detail is, it only draws attention to the lack of similar details in previous works.

    Also, mystery neighbor calls Simon “Daylighter,” and apparently the guards have been planning for this all day. Simon argues that people will notice if he’s gone, including his teachers. But I doubt it, given that these books seem to be set in some kind of endless summer break.

    Eh, even if they do, what will that change? It’s not like Shadowhunters Funland answers any kind of mundane authorities, not to mention they wouldn’t even have idea to look for Simon anywhere outside New York. His disappearance would be noted by police, they’d look for him, maybe there’d be posters and in the end everyone would assume that either he ran away from home or lies somewhere on the bottom of the Hudson river. And Shadowhunters would merrily go on about their business.

    Again, this is a nice bit of though on the guards’ part. But on recollection, didn’t Raphael wear a cross without it burning him? So, why does this work?

    What would they do with an atheist vampire? Quotes from Dawkins and Hitchens? Pictures of FSM?

    “Maybe,” Alec said, “but if you start thinking you know better than the Clave and better than the Law, what makes you any better than the Inquisitor? Or Valentine?”

    Authorial fiat and dashing looks.

    Then Simon pulls out a notebook he has for… some reason, writes something on it, and sets it on fire with his not-wand. End chapter.

    I guess you mean Alec? Because I’m certain Simon doesn’t get to have not-wand, on the account of being a filthy nig… err, I mean downworlder.

  2. Apep on 1 August 2018, 14:04 said:

    I didn’t expect that.

    slap

    No. No. This book does not deserve Monty Python references.

    It took Apep a whole one paragraph to destroy the possible, kind interpretation I came up with.

    Well, that’s about how long it took CC.

    Is it ever clarified whether that is because he finished it despite the whole climactic battle or did he, in uncommon fit of common sense, just try again at some other location once he escaped with all McGuffins still in hand?

    He fled to Shadowhunter Land and did it there. So there was no reason for him to be in New York in the last book.

    I guess you mean Alec?

    Yeah, I did. It’s almost a muscle-memory – these books all seem to focus on three characters: Clary, Jace, and Simon. So if the character is male and not Jace, it must be Simon. Plus, his stuff took up most of the chapter, so suddenly switching to Alec was weird.

  3. The Smith of Lie on 1 August 2018, 15:08 said:

    He fled to Shadowhunter Land and did it there. So there was no reason for him to be in New York in the last book.

    So, on one hand this is terribly stupid because it renders the whole of book 2 completely pointless. On the other it is nice to see a viallain who does not drop the plan just because the hero prevented it once but without denying him the necessary resources. But it rounds back to terribly stupid, since he can apparently stroll right into Shadowhunters Land without immediately getting pounced by them.

    But of course this is par for the course given how Luke the Werewolf Poisoner just strolled straight into the freaking capital with a tripping Clary in tow… These people are only a step above Angelologists when it comes to basic security. I mean, at least they didn’t put Valentine in charge of any important, secret facilities. Right?

  4. Aikaterini on 2 August 2018, 15:29 said:

    And this somehow makes him more interesting! Especially to people like Sebastian and Aline.

    But not to Jace. He’ll still treat Simon like dirt and nobody but Simon will care.

    By which I assume he means Clary deciding to go back to using him as her emotional crutch, because what they have is hardly what I’d call a friendship.

    Then again, Alec and Jace don’t really have a friendship either, so that’s another thing that he and Simon have in common.

    he actually calls Simon by name and shakes his hand, his grip is described as “unpleasantly moist and clammy.” Even when trying to be subtle, CC fails miserably.

    So, now we have two characters who actually treat other people like human beings instead of being rude jerks for no reason and yet Clare hammers it in how we’re supposed to be suspicious of them because, woe, their kindness is all a front! Friendly people are just hiding their true evil, guys! That’s why Jace is so awesome, because he’s honest about what a colossal jerk he is!

    No, he isn’t. He’s still a jerk.

    Simon argues that people will notice if he’s gone, including his teachers.

    And his family. That’s why the timeline of these books is so confusing to me; all of this stuff has been happening and yet school and Simon’s family are barely brought up.

    Because I guess CC had to work extra hard to make these guys unsavory, given how cuddly her main protagonists are.

    She’s basically using the Terry Goodkind method. Want to convince readers that your villains are worse than your violent and selfish protagonists? Turn your villains into Satan’s spawn so that readers can tell the difference!

    And of course Jace shows not even the slightest hint of remorse about her death, because she was mean to him.

    Because never mind that she died trying to save his worthless life. No, she dared to not worship the ground that he walked on, so that means nothing to him.

    “Maybe,” Alec said, “but if you start thinking you know better than the Clave and better than the Law, what makes you any better than the Inquisitor? Or Valentine?”

    Nothing. There is no reason why Jace hasn’t joined up with Valentine. He’s a racist, violent thug who cares nothing for other people, he agrees with Valentine philosophically about Downworlders and mundanes being lower than dirt (or just Downworlders since Valentine doesn’t talk about killing mundanes), and he just wants to show off and kills things, which he could still do if Valentine kept him on a leash as his attack dog.

    Because Jace is a petulant toddler

    Because that’s so attractive in a romantic lead. A spoiled, petulant toddler who throws tantrums whenever someone dares to contradict him or call him out on his terrible behavior and whose overinflated ego must be coddled at all times.

    I know that everyone has their own tastes, but I seriously don’t understand why we’re supposed to like this character. There are so many other anti-heroes and even sympathetic villains who fit this character type and who still manage to be more likable than him, so what’s so great about Jace? He’s hot? There are a lot of good-looking anti-heroes and villains. He has a tragic backstory? Please, those are a dime a dozen (in fact, very often it seems like having a tragic backstory is a requirement for being an anti-hero). He’s great at killing monsters? Again, that’s not rare. He plays the piano and is multilingual? Um, okay. I don’t see how those make up for his repulsive personality, though. He’s witty and charming? Uh, no, he’s not. Being a condescending and spiteful racist is not ‘witty’ or ‘charming.’ So…what else is there?

  5. Princesselwen on 2 August 2018, 20:38 said:

    About symbols and vampires—I wonder if it would be a bit like The Dresden Files. There, a symbol is empowered by the faith of the wielder. Since the protagonist believes that his pentangle represents magic as good, it’s made more powerful against evil.

    So, in the reverse, a vampire would be affected by symbols or words related to what they believed as a human, whether it was a religion or a philosophy or a system of political thought.

  6. The Smith of Lie on 3 August 2018, 06:51 said:

    About symbols and vampires—I wonder if it would be a bit like The Dresden Files. There, a symbol is empowered by the faith of the wielder. Since the protagonist believes that his pentangle represents magic as good, it’s made more powerful against evil.
    So, in the reverse, a vampire would be affected by symbols or words related to what they believed as a human, whether it was a religion or a philosophy or a system of political thought.

    Both of those ideas have certain precedent in media. The faith of the wielder being more popular one – it has been used in Vampite the Masquerade, just to add one more example next to Dresden Files.

    The faith of the vampire determining whether the symbol of faith affects them is bit less common. Actually the only example I can name off the top of my head is the Fearless Vampire Hunters movie, wherein a Jewish vampire comments use of crucifix with Oy vey, you got the wrong vampire.

    The second option has a problem with its internal logic. Basic idea behind holy symbols being detrimental towards vampires is that whatever divine power they represent is acting against them. If we divorce the symbol from the divine power then we need a replacement for it. Wielder’s faith in the symbol of their beliefs works here, because it is specifically a faith in power of the symbol to protect them. Vampire’s faith in symbol is where it gets shaky. It makes sense for a Christian vampire to fear the crucifix, since it is symbol of Jesus, who in Christian mythology was a figure opposed to beings of darkness, what with excorcising evil spirits and whatnot.

    But the farther we move from religions the weirder it becomes. Atheist vampire has no reason to consider whatever symbol of atheism he recognizes to be inimical to him. Even some religions would not necessarily work – say variants of Bhuddism or Confucianism.

    Note, that this is not the crux of problem with the use of it by CC. It might be a weak idea if one overthinks it, but the bigger problem is the fact that CC failed to properly establish it and ignored it when it was comfortable for her to do so. This creates a shoddy world, where vampires sometimes are weak to holy symbols and sometimes are not, based on arbitrary whim of author at any given moment.

    As a bonus – there is a great, hard sci-fi by Peter Watts Blindsight and it has probably the most interesting takes on vampires. In short – they are a genetic varaint of homo sapiens without supernatural powers, but with some superhuman abilities. And the source of the cross/crucifix as their weakness was a wierd defect in their brains, which gave them seizures when an object that had 90 degrees angle took big enough part of their field of vision (sort of like how flashing lights can cause epileptic seizure in some people). The raise of architecture caused their extinction untill they got recreated way into the future from the recovered fossils.