DEDICATION

First off, CC apparently decided to dedicate this book to her grandfather. What a nice sentiment. However, given the results, I have to wonder how he feels about it.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The acknowledgements begin with CC’s writing group, the “Massachusetts All-Stars”. I really have to wonder if they actually call themselves that. The members (at least, those listed) are all published authors, some of which have won awards. Methinks we’ve found how she got a book deal.

This next bit has to be quoted:

Also, Tom Hold and Peg Kerr for encouraging me before there ever was a book, and Justine Larbalestier and Eve Sinaiko for giving me their thoughts on it once it was. (Loc. 56-57)

Well, at least now we know who to blame for this thing.

She then thanks her parents. Personally, I would have put them first, but that’s me.

There’s someone named Eric for “vampire motorbikes that run on demon energies,” (we’ll get to that), and an Elka for “looking better in black than the widows of her enemies.” (and that as well. But trust me, it’s stupid) (Loc. 58-59).

There’s a Theo and Val mentioned, who “[created] beautiful images to go with [CC’s] prose.” (Loc. 59). Again, I’m not sure what that has to do with anything, as there are no illustrations in the book, though I have the Kindle version (I’d rather be caught dead than be seen carrying this book), so maybe the print version has pictures, but I doubt it. Maybe she’s referring to the covers?

CC then thanks her agent and editor, so props there. Not sure how much she actually listened to either, but whatever. I’m sure they both worked hard on this. However, no matter how much you polish it, a turd is still a turd.

Lastly, CC thanks someone named Holly (who I presume is Holly Black, author of the Modern Faerie Tales series and co-author of the Spiderwick Chronicles), and someone named Josh for “making it all worthwhile.” (Location 60). I guess he’s her boyfriend, but I don’t know.

I’ve seen worse acknowledgements. Again, I would have put my parents first, but that’s personal preference.

OPENING QUOTE

Anyway, on to the opening quote, from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar:

I have not slept
Between the acting of a dreadful thing
And the first motion, all the interim is
Like a phantasm, or a hideous dream:
The Genius and the mortal instruments
Are then in council; and the state of man,
Like to a little kingdom, suffers then
The nature of an insurrection.

Now, I’ve never read or seen Julius Caesar, but that doesn’t appear to be important, as this quote seems to have jack-all to do with this series. The sole relevance of this seems to be that it’s the source of the term “mortal instruments”. And, while I can understand liking a certain phrase, and then using it as the name of a book series, I wouldn’t reveal the original source unless it has something to do with the novel or if asked directly regarding the source of said title. I certainly wouldn’t include it in the first book of said series.

And that’s all for now. Not that funny, but now we know a little more about CC and how she most likely got her book deal. Yay learning?

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Comment

  1. Pryotra on 19 September 2012, 12:44 said:

    From what I know, yeah, it’s Holly Black that she’s talking about. Clare and Black are a part of the same writer’s group, and they get really prickly about any kind of criticism.

  2. swenson on 19 September 2012, 13:08 said:

    It makes me sad to think bad things about Holly Black. I loved the Spiderwick Chronicles.

  3. Pryotra on 19 September 2012, 13:17 said:

    Never read it. I tried to wade through Tithe but the writing style just turned me off.

  4. Oculus_Reparo on 19 September 2012, 17:21 said:

    Here’s a handy modern paraphrase of the quotation (from the “No Fear Shakespeare” website . . . which is another issue entirely . . . anyway):

    From the time when you decide to do something terrible to the moment you do it, everything feels unreal, like a horrible dream. The unconscious and the body work together and rebel against the conscious mind.

    The “mortal instruments” in this case translate to “the body.” Does that make us any the wiser? Is the series title supposed to be a sort of pun on the word “mortal”?

  5. Apep on 19 September 2012, 20:17 said:

    From the time when you decide to do something terrible to the moment you do it, everything feels unreal, like a horrible dream. The unconscious and the body work together and rebel against the conscious mind.

    Yeah, I kinda figured that’s what was being said. Honestly, though, I doubt CC knew what “mortal instruments” meant in that context.

    The “mortal instruments” in this case translate to “the body.” Does that make us any the wiser? Is the series title supposed to be a sort of pun on the word “mortal”?

    Not from what I’ve read. As far as I can tell, Cassandra Clare just liked the phrase “mortal instruments” and decided to use it to refer to her McGuffins. And even in-book the name makes no sense, since they’re connected to an angel.

  6. Pryotra on 19 September 2012, 21:15 said:

    I doubt CC knew what “mortal instruments” meant in that context.

    Clare is continuing the tradition of authors like SMeyer: they like throwing around quotes from classical literature and Shakespeare without actually understanding the meanings of the works of the quotations that they’re using.

    And even in-book the name makes no sense,

    I’d agree. She just thought that it sounded cool.

    You know, the used of ‘CC’ reminds me of CC from Code Geass. But Clare’s not awesome enough.

  7. Licht on 21 September 2012, 02:21 said:

    At least we have yet to see Shakespear’s works in covers that resemble those of the Mortal Instruments books.
    Whereas Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Hights and others weren’t as lucky, even got >Bella’s and Edward’s favorite books!<- sticker on them.

  8. Danielle on 10 October 2013, 23:56 said:

    Clare had a fanfic that was also called The Mortal Instruments and uses the Julius Caesar quote, which seems to make more sense in the context of the fanfic (from what I read of it at least; I didn’t read all of it though because it is kind of squinky)