This one’s pretty short compared to the last few chapters. Mostly because it’s wrapping up the “rescue Simon” subplot.

We pick up right where we left off – the wolves and vampires staring each other down like the Jets and the Sharks about to rumble. And it’s about as tense, too.

Raphael cements himself as both a pretentious douche and a horrible stereotype by calling the wolves “Los Niños de la Luna,” which CC helpfully informs us means “children of the moon,” which in turn means werewolves.

No Shit Sherlock: 2

Double because 1) I think we can figure out what the Spanish means, and 2) were we supposed to think they were normal wolves? Seriously, CC, I know you’re writing for a YA audience, but that doesn’t mean they’re stupid.

We then learn that CC has decided to follow the World of Darkness/Underworld trend and have the werewolves and vampires be mortal enemies, and that one group being in the others’ territory is strictly forbidden by Covenant law. Considering that we learned last chapter that it’s perfectly legal for vampires to kill anyone who enters their territory, this whole Covenant think kida sucks. I’m with Valentine – tear the whole thing down and start from scratch.

Jace goes on to inform us that something must have happened to cause the werewolves to do this, and that the current situation is very, very bad.

No Shit Sherlock: 4

Gee, ya think? CC, please stop explaining this kind of thing. When you do, it really kills the tension.

But Clary, having the IQ of a cucumber, has to have it explained that they’re “about to be in the middle of a war.”

No Shit Sherlock: 5

All that explaining suddenly makes sense – if Clary can’t figure this stuff out on her own, there’s no way the readers can. And considering that this series shares an audience with Twilight, that might not be entirely wrong.

CC finally gets back to the impending violence. And in true Meyer-esque fashion, it immediately turns to talking. One of the wolves shifts back, thankfully including clothes, and explains that they came for Clary. Jace swears and asks why Clary didn’t tell him she knew any werewolves. She tells him that she doesn’t. It appears that Jace has completely forgotten that, until a week ago, Clary didn’t know that any of this stuff existed. Nice to know that our hero has the memory of a goldfish.

And then we get this little exchange:

“This is bad,” said Jace.
“You said that before.”
“It seemed worth repeating.”
“Well, it wasn’t.” Clary shrank back against him. “_Jace_. They’re all looking at me.”

Rapier Twit: 1

I showed you that for two reasons.

First, the obvious bad comedy. Some writers/characters can do flippant during tense situations. Harry Dresden, for example. Buffy Summers or Angel, for another. This is not funny, because I keep reading Jace’s dialogue with this smug, self-satisfied tone. As if repeating the joke will just make it funnier.

Second is the fact that everything has literally ground to a halt while Clary and Jace had their conversation. The last chapter ended with a huge fight about to break out, and within pages all that tension has disappeared. That Westside Story reference I made back at the beginning? A dance-off would have been preferable to this.

Raphael pulls that idiotic rule about vampire territory, and it seems either CC realized that there was supposed to be a fight, or someone pointed it out to her, because the werewolves and vampires finally start going at it. If the five minutes of talking between the end of chapter 14 and now had been cut, I might still care.

While that’s going on, Clary and Jace are cowering in the corner doing absolutely nothing. Simon gets loose, leading to Clary chasing after him. Jace, predictably, doesn’t respond well to this.

“Clary, don’t chase the rat. He’s fleeing. That’s what rats do.”

There is no way to interpret that statement that makes Jace look good. If he means that Simon’s brain has been overridden by rat instincts, that’s clearly wrong. If he means “rat” in a metaphorical sense, then that’s also demonstrably false.

Clary calls Jace an “ungreatful cretin,” and continues after Simon.

Weird Word Choice: 1

I think you mean “arrogant douche,” Clary.

Simon runs up and starts pawing at some drapes. Clary moves them aside, revealing a door.

Let me make this clear: Simon has been turned into a rat, and he’s still more useful and heroic than Jace. Seriously, why is he not the hero?

Speaking of the asshole, Jace shows up and acts vaguely nonchalant about the whole thing. I think it’s a coping mechanism – he just can’t accept that he’s less awesome than a rat. Clary tries the door, but it doesn’t work. Jace then tries to break it down. It’s the most useful thing he’s done since entering the hotel in the first place. When the door does not immediately yield, he responds with this:

“My shoulder will never be the same. I expect you to nurse me back to health.”

Rapier Twit: 2

Jace, given the small scale battle going on behind you, if you don’t get that door open, your shoulder is going to be the least of your worries. And CC, it really kills the tension if your characters are flirting while trying to flee for their lives.

They start to argue, only for one of the werewolves to attack Clary. Well, I guess CC did remember the fight going on.

Jace gets back to working at the door and Clary pulls her dagger and throws it at the wolf. The narration specifically tells us that she’s never even held a weapon before, let alone thrown one. Neither have I, but I’m fairly certain that hitting anything with a thrown weapon, let alone hitting anything correctly, is kinda hard. Especially if the weapon being thrown isn’t properly balanced for throwing, which I’m assuming Clary’s dagger isn’t.

In a realistic book, she’d miss, or the knife would hit wrong and bounce off harmlessly. But since Clary is the author’s self-insert sue, her throw is perfect, and the werewolf runs off.

Clary’s innate awesomeness having been established, Jace finally manages to get the door open. They run through just in time to escape another two werewolves chasing after them. Of course. Jace whips out his wand (not that wand, you pervs), and casts some locking spell on the door. And since Clary now has her innate Shadowhunter abilities have been unlocked, she now can read runes. And yes, CC insists on explaining what each rune looks like and exactly what it means in a faux old-timey style reminiscent of the Harry Potter books (compare: “to hold against pursuit” and “for use on enemies”). It is really annoying.

They start moving down the hall, eventually coming to an old, disused stairway. How… convenient that the vampires didn’t destroy this particular stairway. They start up, being sensible for once and going slowly. And then Jace’s little ward breaks, and the werewolves are after them again. Guess Jace isn’t as good at this stuff as he thinks. And so they begin running up the stairs.

Again, if this book were set in any way realistic, some of the old wooden stairs would break or collapse under their weight. But that doesn’t happen. Oh, CC tries to make it tense, but when it’s revealed that they manage to reach the fifth floor without being in any real danger, I become a bit skeptical.

And it turns out that this hotel only has five floors, because the sixth floor landing leads to the roof. The door locks behind them, and Jace puts together that this must be how the vampires enter the hotel.

No Shit Sherlock: 6

Clary goes to see if there’s a fire escape, and gets a bit of vertigo from being ten stories up.

Wait, ten stories? What? Oh, I see what I did wrong – I assumed each landing connected to a corresponding level. There were five landings connected to interior floors, and the sixth to the roof. Silly me, not knowing that CC pictured this stairway with landings on every other floor. It’s not like that sort of thing could easily be avoided by using terms like “eighth floor landing” instead of “fifth landing” like a sensible person. Did CC’s editor or proof-reader not catch this?

Whatever. The fire escape is a bust, because the vampires destroyed it.

Let me get this straight – the vampires destroyed all the stairs, because they don’t need them. They destroyed the fire escape, and most of the interior stairways. But not the one that leads directly to the roof.

Plot Hole: 1

Yeah, sure, that makes sense.

Then Jace comes up with a brilliant idea. Remember those demon motorcycles from a few chapters ago? The ones that can supposedly fly? They’re gonna steal one.

Just wait. It gets worse.

Clary thinks this is a stupid idea, what with him not even having keys for the things. Oh, but since the bikes run on demonic energies, he doesn’t need a key to start one. What kind of moon logic is that?

Fuck it. Moving on.

Clary hops on the back, and we get a description of her feeling Jace’s muscles under his shirt.

Both Hands, Ma’am: 1

Werwolves? Vampires? What are you talking about?

Also, never before has the term “riding bitch” felt more appropriate.

The bike starts, and yet they don’t immediately get moving, because Jace is letting up on the choke. Even though the bike runs on demon power, not gas. Because CC has to artificially pump up the tension. The wolves and vampires break through the door just as the bike takes off over the edge of the roof.

And then Clary and Jace plummet to their deaths, because all those stories about demon motorcycles being able to fly were just that.

I wish.

Instead, we get a commercial break.

Random Scene Break: 1

The bike starts, and they fly off into the night. And we’ve finally come to the real reason for why Alec and Isabelle weren’t brought along on this little adventure – so CC can do her own version of Harry and Hermione’s flight from Prisoner of Azkaban. I wonder if she was a Harmonian?

Jace is, of course, having the time of his life. And while I can appreciate enjoying flying, he should be more focused on escaping. Because those vampires could chase after them on their own flying motorcycles.

Oh, wait, never mind. This is CC we’re talking about.

Clary makes a comment about how her mother riding off on a motorcycle with some guy (oh, now you remember that you have a mother), and Jace gives her this bit of reassurance:

“She wouldn’t say that if she knew me,” he called back to her confidently. “I’m an excellent driver.”

Rapier Twit: 3

Really, Jace? How exactly did you learn to drive? Because I’m fairly certain that the Institute doesn’t have any cars (they have to borrow a van later on), and I doubt you’re willing to interact with mundane society enough to get a license. And on top of all that, motorcycles require their own specialized license.

Next, Clary’s mom obviously wasn’t referring to her daughter’s safety. Your whole “I don’t know a damn thing about mundane society” schtick has passed annoying and become blindingly stupid.

And now we get more proof that Jace is both a sociopath and should not be left unsupervised. Clary remembers that Jace said that only some vampire motorcycles could fly, and asks how Jace knew that this one could fly. His answer? He didn’t!

Yep. This is the second time that Jace has unnecessarily put Clary’s life in danger. Oh, yes, both times she was already in danger, but Jace doesn’t seem to consider that what he’s willing to do might also kill her.

But of course, since Jace is suck a huge fucking Gary Stu, everything always works out fine in the end.

Also, note that we only ever learn this stuff after the fact. Almost as if CC didn’t think of it at the time.

And then Jace tells Clary she should look down, because the view is great. Yeah, he’s really an asshole.

We get a lengthy description of them flying over New York, with Clary getting a very brief case of vertigo, giving her an excuse to clutch at Jace even more.

Both Hands, Ma’am: 2

Also, for having such a terrible fear of heights, Clary is remarkably unfazed for being so high up with nothing below her but a magical motorcycle, if the narration is any indicator.

Plot Hole: 2

They start heading east, and once again Simon is the only one that’s really aware of what’s going on. Namely, that the sun is rising. Clary says that it looks pretty, but Jace freaks. Why? Well, the bike runs of demon energy, and sunrise cancels it out. Or something. It’s really not explained beyond the bike suddenly not working anymore.

Why exactly would sunrise cancel out demon powers? When was that established?

Plot Hole: 3

Okay, another quick counter example. In the Dresden Files, certain magical stuff (namely anything from the Nevernever) doesn’t react well to sunrise or sunlight. The October Daye novels have similar rules – sunrise wipes away magic, so things like protection spells have to be recast daily. Both series quickly explain this. But I guess CC just assumed that everyone would know this.

The bike starts dropping, and it looks like they’re going to crash. Rather than, say, landing the bike safely, Jace decides to gun it and they only sort-of crash in a parking lot. Clary even gets tossed from the bike. “Excellent driver” my ass.

When Clary starts looking around, the first thing she notices is how Jace looks, including the use of the term “gold curls.”

Both Hands, Ma’am: 3

I mention this because she completely fails to notice the now human Simon, even though he’s laying right next to her. I guess now that Simon’s no longer in danger, it’s okay for Clary to go back to ignoring him.

Bitch: 1

The two “best friends” reconnect, and Jace acts all hurt that Clary’s hugging the friend that she spent the past two and a half chapters trying to rescue. I’d almost feel bad for him, if I wasn’t almost certain that any emotional display from Jace was an act.

And thus the Simon as a rat sub-plot comes to an end. And what purpose did it ultimately serve? Well, CC got to rip-off J.K. Rowling without having to worry too much about legal reprisals, and she got to show us more of her really shoddy world building. And perhaps most importantly, she got to avoid having to write her characters actually having to figure out what’s really going on. Why have them actually work for something when she can just have some random guy explain everything?

Nothing was really accomplished, and the ramifications of this don’t show up until the next book. If that doesn’t just scream “fan fiction,” I don’t know what does. This whole subplot should have been cut. But CC probably got upset and whined to her friend Holly Black, who then told the editor to leave CC’s work alone. Of course, that’s just speculation on my part, but it wouldn’t surprise me.

And what the hell does “High and Dry” have to do with this chapter? I get the “high” part, but where does “dry” come into it? It doesn’t even work in a metaphorical sense, because at no point are they in any real danger.

Also, if I ever meet that Eric guy responsible for the flying vampire motorcycles, I’m going to hit him. Come to think of it, why would vampires even need flying motorcycles if they can fly on their own?

Plot Hole: 4

Anyway, that’s all for now. Now that this annoying little subplot’s finally come to a close, we can get back to the main plot.

Right?

Please?

Counts:

Weird Word Choice: 1 (Total 66)
Rapier Twit: 3 (Total 42)
No Shit Sherlock: 6 (Total 33)
Plot Hole: 4 (Total 58)
Random Scene Break: 1 (Total 8)
Both Hands, Ma’am: 3 (Total 18)
Bitch: 1 (Total 16)

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Comment

  1. swenson on 13 August 2013, 11:37 said:

    in a faux old-timey style reminiscent of the Harry Potter books

    I can’t imagine why.

    only some vampire motorcycles could fly

    I’m sorry, I just can’t get past the “vampire motorcycles that can fly due to demon power”.

    But seriously, why can only some of the vampire motorcycles fly? And why would vampire motorcycles that don’t fly be on the roof?

    Namely, that the sun is rising. Clary says that it looks pretty, but Jace freaks. Why? Well, the bike runs of demon energy, and sunrise cancels it out. Or something. It’s really not explained beyond the bike suddenly not working anymore.

    Jace is such an idiot. Did he not once think “oh right, these things switch off at daylight and it’s almost morning”? Of course he didn’t.

    Come to think of it, why would vampires even need flying motorcycles if they can fly on their own?

    WAIT A MINUTE, that’s right! That’s even stupider!

    Arrrrrgh, this book.

    And so many people—SO MANY PEOPLE—think it’s great. Even people who I respect. Are we just the crazy ones?

  2. Pryotra on 13 August 2013, 11:38 said:

    We then learn that CC has decided to follow the World of Darkness/Underworld trend and have the werewolves and vampires be mortal enemies,

    There was a set of folklore around this that I highly doubt that Clare knows anything about. Basically, a get was taken to the ecclesiastical court (since in those times people on trial for witchcraft went there) and said that he wasn’t a witch, rather he was a werewolf, who had been given the power to change by God to fight against witches and vampires and other nasties, and that one day he’d be admitted into a special place in heaven. The Church, which was on a strict ‘there’s no such thing as magic’ kick at the time, declared him insane. He was beaten and sent about his business. That is the earliest story I know where we have a reference to Vampires vs. Werewolves.

    And from what I know with Clare, it’s never really mentioned why they don’t like one another in her world.

    Seriously, why is he not the hero?

    It’s kind of funny that Harry Potter is always the hero, no matter what continuity he’s in.

    I’ve been waiting to give that rant for so long…

    I think you mean “arrogant douche,” Clary.

    I wonder if she was a Harmonian?

    I think she was. I think the pairings were HarryxHermione and DracoxGinny, but I could be wrong. As I said in my review, I never was very interested in the Draco Trilogy.

    Now that this annoying little subplot’s finally come to a close, we can get back to the main plot.

    Of course not silly! It’s time for Date!Jace, and his over the top abusive past which was ripped nearly line for line from the fanfic. That one I can prove.

  3. Asahel on 13 August 2013, 14:41 said:

    In a realistic book, she’d miss, or the knife would hit wrong and bounce off harmlessly.

    I’ve probably already used this example before during another spork pointing out a character’s inexplicable level of skill with a weapon previously unused, but I’m going to use it again anyway.

    In one of the Prydain stories, the main characters have to shoot arrows at some pursuers. They’ve never used bows before. They miss every single shot (as you would expect).

  4. Apep on 13 August 2013, 15:22 said:

    Jace is such an idiot. Did he not once think “oh right, these things switch off at daylight and it’s almost morning”? Of course he didn’t.

    In retrospect, it looks like CC came up with that on the fly and didn’t realize how Jace knowing that would affect his actions. Yes, he could have lost track of time, but he should have seen the sun coming up once they were airborne.

    WAIT A MINUTE, that’s right! That’s even stupider!

    I literally didn’t realize that until I was almost finished with this. Seriously.

    Are we just the crazy ones?

    No, but there’s no accounting for taste.

    There was a set of folklore around this that I highly doubt that Clare knows anything about.

    Yeah, but I also remember reading something about werewolves turning into vampires when they die. Folklore can be weird like that.

    I think she was. I think the pairings were HarryxHermione and DracoxGinny, but I could be wrong.

    Great, now I’m wondering if CC also incorporated Ron the Deatheater into her trilogy. It really wouldn’t surprise me.

    Of course not silly! It’s time for Date!Jace, and his over the top abusive past which was ripped nearly line for line from the fanfic. That one I can prove.

    I know. I wish I didn’t.

    In one of the Prydain stories, the main characters have to shoot arrows at some pursuers. They’ve never used bows before. They miss every single shot (as you would expect).

    You know what makes that even worse? CC name-dropped the Prydain series a few chapters ago.

  5. Juracan on 13 August 2013, 17:36 said:

    Raphael cements himself as both a pretentious douche and a horrible stereotype by calling the wolves “Los Niños de la Luna,” which CC helpfully informs us means “children of the moon,” which in turn means werewolves.

    I don’t… no. I’m tired of hearing werewolves referred to as “children of the Moon”, especially that no one would actually say that unless they meant to be incredibly dramatic.

    Jace gets back to working at the door and Clary pulls her dagger and throws it at the wolf. The narration specifically tells us that she’s never even held a weapon before, let alone thrown one. Neither have I, but I’m fairly certain that hitting anything with a thrown weapon, let alone hitting anything correctly, is kinda hard. Especially if the weapon being thrown isn’t properly balanced for throwing, which I’m assuming Clary’s dagger isn’t.

    I’ve thrown knives. Throwing knives, balanced for being chucked at targets. After some practice, I actually got good at hitting the target, the issue I had was making it stick point first, which doesn’t seem to count for squat, even less so if a giant killer wolf is going after you. So Clary, with no experience whatsoever, should not be this good.

    I get that part of it is supposed to be “Shadowhunter blood”, and okay, I’m cool with her having special abilities based on that, but the knowledge on how to throw knives perfectly? I’m going to have to call BS. Powers=/=skill.

    Compare this to… say, Percy Jackson. He gets awesome sword-fighting skills seemingly on the fly. But this isn’t until he’s actually shown some basic moves and taught what he’s supposed to do. Clary here, on the other hand, as far as I can tell, hasn’t handled any sort of weapons whatsoever before this point.

    Remember those demon motorcycles from a few chapters ago?

    Yes, but now I’m wondering… how does that work? How does one harness “demon power” to power a motorcycle? And if the power running the motorcycle is demonic, is the rider affected in any way?

  6. Bekah on 13 August 2013, 18:35 said:

    Just jumping in—I’m working on sporking The Draco Trilogy, and I’m through the second book. She does ship Harry/Hermione and Draco/Ginny, as well as (apparently) Ron/Fem!Blaise.

    So far Ron is actually a good friend of the main characters and seems set to remain that way, although he is on the sidelines.

    (Also, reading DT after reading MI is weird. You can tell she recycled a lot of things from her fan fiction.)

    I’m glad you’re sporking this series. I was a fan back in eighth grade…not so much anymore. I blame the picture of the shirtless guy on the front cover for it.

  7. Apep on 13 August 2013, 19:28 said:

    (Also, reading DT after reading MI is weird. You can tell she recycled a lot of things from her fan fiction.)

    Nice to have that confirmed.

    I guess doing that kinda makes sense, but it also kinda doesn’t. Yeah, CC “made her name” with that, but it also got her accused of plagiarism, which should have raised some red flags. Then again, how many agents/editors/publishers actually bother looking at that kind of thing?

    I blame the picture of the shirtless guy on the front cover for it.

    Probably the main reason I’m glad I got a digital copy. I’d feel really awkward carrying a book with a cover like that. Contemptible Cover doesn’t begin to cover it.

    Also, where are you posting your sporkings? I’m interested in comparing the two.

  8. Bekah on 13 August 2013, 19:58 said:

    I’ll hopefully be posting them to Das Sporking. It’ll take a while, though; I’m trying to finish sporking the series before I post it, and the three fics combined are longer than the first six Harry Potter books.

    I suppose that’s why she tried to take it all down from the internet. Thankfully there are still a few die-hard fans put there to save it…I think.

  9. Pryotra on 13 August 2013, 20:49 said:

    As we’re discussing our lovely Clare, I thought you’d be interested in this.

    Yeah, but I also remember reading something about werewolves turning into vampires when they die. Folklore can be weird like that.

    Well, I was more talking about why they hated one another. Pretty much anyone bad, as far as the stories are considered, who dies becomes a vampire. And that dude’s testimony was considered weird, even for the time. But it’s still the first mention I’ve found of someone talking about why the two hated one another.

    I’ll hopefully be posting them to Das Sporking.

    I’m looking forwards to seeing it…

  10. Asahel on 13 August 2013, 22:08 said:

    On the topic of vampires vs. werewolves:

    One of the best rationales I’ve heard for them being mortal enemies is that vampires are connected with the town and city—they like large groupings of humans on which to feed. Werewolves, on the other hand, prefer the wide open outdoors—being beasts of nature, so to speak. Thus, they want incompatible things: vampires want humans to spread and cover the earth in order to maintain an ample food supply while werewolves would be perfectly happy if there were no humans around to sully their natural habitat.

    That said, in my own work, I’m eschewing the vampires vs. werewolves route. Don’t get me wrong, they probably wouldn’t like each other if they ran into each other, but that’s just the point: they’re isolated from each other geographically, so they don’t really interact at all, hostile or otherwise.

  11. Maria on 14 August 2013, 12:10 said:

    I guess doing that kinda makes sense, but it also kinda doesn’t. Yeah, CC “made her name” with that, but it also got her accused of plagiarism, which should have raised some red flags. Then again, how many agents/editors/publishers actually bother looking at that kind of thing?

    I think the plagiarism here if there is any is much less overt than it was in the Draco Trilogy. If I remember it correctly, there were entire passages in the DT that were basically lifted without attribution or reference to the source material. Here, there are a lot of derivative scenes and cliches but she at least rewords them a bit.

  12. Pryotra on 14 August 2013, 13:40 said:

    Here, there are a lot of derivative scenes and cliches but she at least rewords them a bit.

    And the ripped from FMA cookbook, which toes the line, but I don’t think manages to cross it.

    There has been some scandal about a group of short stories that she wrote about Magnus Bane and reusing some of the dialog from The Hunger Games (the movie).

  13. Maria on 14 August 2013, 14:26 said:

    FMA cookbook?

    Ooh, I hadn’t heard about the short stories though.

  14. Apep on 14 August 2013, 15:17 said:

    As we’re discussing our lovely Clare, I thought you’d be interested in this.

    You know, I’m trying to remain objective about CC, but the more I hear about her, the more convinced I become that she’s just not a very nice person.

    Here, there are a lot of derivative scenes and cliches but she at least rewords them a bit.

    True, I can’t help feeling that she never really moved beyond writing fanfic. Even her published stuff doesn’t seem as tightly written as it should (ex: the demon motorcycles).

    There has been some scandal about a group of short stories that she wrote about Magnus Bane and reusing some of the dialog from The Hunger Games (the movie).

    That’s just wonderful. Will she never learn?

    FMA cookbook?

    Yeah, I’m a little fuzzy on that as well. Care to explain, Pryotra?

  15. Pryotra on 14 August 2013, 16:56 said:

    Well, in Full Metal Alchemist, there’s a major plot point that’s disguised as a cookbook, written in code, and reveals a huge part of the conspiracy to essentially kill everyone within the entire country to turn them into stones that allow alchemists to break the laws of nature.

    In City of Glass their is a major plot point spellbook, which is supposed to revive Clary’s mom (remember her?) and it’s disguised as a cookbook. This spellbook ends up making Sebastian break his masquerade and kind of solidifies Magnus Bane allying himself with Clary instead of hanging around, making out with Alec every so often. Of course, hers is much easier to get and realize what it is, and shows none of the intelligence that Ed and Al had to show, and really just makes everyone look stupid.

    but the more I hear about her, the more convinced I become that she’s just not a very nice person.

    Same here. It really irritates me that she actually whines about how she was bullied with the plagiarism thing.

    That’s just wonderful. Will she never learn?

    Apparently not. Since it was co-written with someone, they’re taking the hit, but it’s really irritating.

  16. tornado on 14 August 2013, 22:32 said:

    Another plot point I didn’t get. If the werewolves are looking for Clary, presumably to save her from the vampires, then why did some of the werewolves attack Jace and Clary?

  17. Fireshark on 14 August 2013, 22:39 said:

    Is it just me, or is this the most generic movie poster of the summer?

  18. Apep on 14 August 2013, 23:02 said:

    Well, in Full Metal Alchemist, there’s a major plot point that’s disguised as a cookbook, written in code, and reveals a huge part of the conspiracy to essentially kill everyone within the entire country to turn them into stones that allow alchemists to break the laws of nature.

    Oh, right. I totally forgot that bit.

    It really irritates me that she actually whines about how she was bullied with the plagiarism thing.

    Ah, hypocrisy. Ain’t it grand?

    If the werewolves are looking for Clary, presumably to save her from the vampires, then why did some of the werewolves attack Jace and Clary?

    Well, we don’t know yet that the werewolves were there to rescue them. I’ll give CC this much – that was actually a half-way decent twist.

    Is it just me, or is this the most generic movie poster of the summer?

    It’s definitely not inspiring. I guess they’re counting on doing what Twilight did, and getting most of their profit from the fans.

  19. lilyWhite on 15 August 2013, 09:27 said:

    Is it just me, or is this the most generic movie poster of the summer?

    The Mortal Instruments: It’s about five people…

    At least the guy whom I assume is Jace looks sufficiently asswaggly…

  20. Master Chief on 15 August 2013, 18:43 said:

    So Pryotra. I was reading through the link on Claire.

    Isn’t there a way that she could be brought up on legal charges for some of this?

  21. Pryotra on 15 August 2013, 21:41 said:

    Isn’t there a way that she could be brought up on legal charges for some of this?

    From my limited knowledge, only if the victim was the one to bring the charges up. The only thing we can do is make it so that people know about the crap that she tends to pull.

  22. Fireshark on 15 August 2013, 22:16 said:

    The author of the book she plagiarized did later give her permission, retroactively. Plus the Draco Trilogy was taken offline. There’s no case to be had as far as I can tell.

  23. Apep on 15 August 2013, 22:35 said:

    But it wasn’t just one book or author that she was accused of plagiarizing – it was several (I believe), as well as tv shows, which she still didn’t cite.

    Plus, that’s not the only thing mentioned in Pryotra’s link – there’s also evidence of CC attempting/encouraging people to get a girl kicked out of her college, getting an anti-Clare blog taken down and later claiming they were being “anti-Semitic” despite that not being the reason the accounts were banned, and generally being really nasty to someone who was supposedly her friend.

    So as bad as the plagiarism is, that appears to be only the tip of the iceberg.

  24. Master Chief on 16 August 2013, 00:08 said:

    When in doubt, put personal information on 4chan.

  25. Master Chief on 16 August 2013, 00:15 said:

    nevermind, that’s dumb

  26. swenson on 16 August 2013, 13:00 said:

    Wow, I just got done reading through Pyrotra’s link, and… wow. I knew bits of the story before, but I never knew all of that. Clare has officially gone beyond “annoying and potentially plagiaristic” to “horrible scum who is definitely plagiaristic”.

    Even if the Mortal Instruments are completely free of even the slightest hint of plagiarism, it does make it hard to actually trust the woman, after her repeated refusals to just own up to lifting stuff from other people. (Also, figured she was only a bit older than me. Nope, she’s twice my age. And still apparently doesn’t understand what plagiarism is.)

  27. Juracan on 16 August 2013, 17:33 said:

    …well, I’m appalled.

    I was going to say that the whole Hunger Games issues was a non-issue— one snippet of dialogue can easily come off as an homage more than true plagiarism. But having read a lot on the cyber-bullying… it leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Granted, I think if we’re going to seriously criticize her work, we should focus more on the writing than the misdeeds of the author. But those really don’t help matters at all.

    If Clare had addressed this at all, like made a formal apology, I think I’d be a bit more lenient. But as it is, I’m quite disconcerted that this hasn’t become more of an issue.

  28. Ryan McCarthy on 16 August 2013, 19:03 said:

    @Juracan

    That’s probably because Clare already had a dedicated fanbase who will defend her no matter what. This pretty much ensured that her books were going to sell well no matter what so her publishers most likely don’t care about the whole plagiarism thing.

  29. Apep on 17 August 2013, 16:34 said:

    Granted, I think if we’re going to seriously criticize her work, we should focus more on the writing than the misdeeds of the author. But those really don’t help matters at all.

    That’s the real problem I’m having. I’m sincerely trying to ignore all this other stuff and try to view the book independently of the author, but it’s hard to shove all of that other stuff aside. Still, I’m trying.

    It also doesn’t help that the writing itself is kind of infuriating at times.

  30. Bekah on 17 August 2013, 19:09 said:

    Well, you seem to be doing a pretty good job of not attacking her personally, but just addressing the issues that are actually coming up in the writing. So good job there.

    (And really—sometimes what she says is nasty. That “maybe ugly people didn’t want to live forever” made me want to smack something.)

    As a side note, apparently CC’s real name is Judith Henel (according to TVTropes, at least). So I suppose Clary’s name isn’t too bad of a self-insertion. :P

  31. Apep on 17 August 2013, 21:00 said:

    Well, you seem to be doing a pretty good job of not attacking her personally, but just addressing the issues that are actually coming up in the writing. So good job there.

    Thanks. It wasn’t really an issue until Pryotra posted that link, though. I was reading some of that stuff a couple days ago and decided that I couldn’t work on sporking the next chapter because I was too angry at CC to be objective. And knowing some of that kinda colors the book. For example, there’s a bit in the next chapter where Simon pretty much says he’s okay with her being a bad friend, because she’s Clary. It was really annoying.

    That “maybe ugly people didn’t want to live forever” made me want to smack something.

    Yeah, re-reading that was the first time I actually started to wonder about CC in less abstract terms.

    As a side note, apparently CC’s real name is Judith Henel (according to TVTropes, at least). So I suppose Clary’s name isn’t too bad of a self-insertion. :P

    That may be true, but she’s still a frikkin’ Mary Sue.

  32. Pryotra on 18 August 2013, 22:22 said:

    It wasn’t really an issue until Pryotra posted that link

    Sorry, I was surfing around, found it, and started raging. I hope it doesn’t effect you’re sporking too much.

    As a side note, apparently CC’s real name is Judith Henel (according to TVTropes, at least). So I suppose Clary’s name isn’t too bad of a self-insertion. :P

    Meh, it still smacks of the ff.net kids who liked to write long series about their screen names. (Like Arianna Black.)

  33. Nate Winchester on 3 September 2013, 15:46 said:

    Come to think of it, why would vampires even need flying motorcycles if they can fly on their own?

    WAIT A MINUTE, that’s right! That’s even stupider!

    Arrrrrgh, this book.

    And so many people—SO MANY PEOPLE—think it’s great. Even people who I respect. Are we just the crazy ones?

    Well that’s rather like asking why do we need motorcycles when we can walk anywhere? Maybe they use them the same reasons we do. 1) It goes faster. 2) it’s freakin’ badass! ;-)

    Meh, it still smacks of the ff.net kids who liked to write long series about their screen names. (Like Arianna Black.)

    Hey I resemble that remark!

    [shifty eyes]

  34. Jade on 16 July 2016, 01:12 said:

    Compare this to… say, Percy Jackson. He gets awesome sword-fighting skills seemingly on the fly. But this isn’t until he’s actually shown some basic moves and taught what he’s supposed to do.

    Also, it’s shown to be somewhat magically induced, as well as temporary. When he poured water over his head, he could beat the trained guy. As that boost wore off, he started to lose. What was Clary’s boost? And it’ll probably last all series, won’t it…

    As for the motorcycles… I just keep thinking of Sirius BLack’s flying motorbike that he lent to Hagrid.