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    •  
      CommentAuthorMoldorm
    • CommentTimeJan 11th 2010
     

    Welcome back, Devin. A zombie now, I see.

    I;‘ve been reading Fevre Dream recently, and am finding it quite enjoyable. Probably one of the better vampire portrayals of recent years.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVirgil
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     

    Just finished Foundation. Mind=blown.

  1.  

    The whole series? I assume the “mind=blown” means it was good?

    •  
      CommentAuthorVirgil
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     

    No, the first one, bookstore didn’t have the sequels when I went back.

    That or I killed myself. Though the latter is unlikely.

    I was wary to pick it up at first, but its so awesome. Little actual ‘sci fi’ in it, mainly politics combined with a massive Xanatos Gambit and several Xanatos Speed Chess. :D

  2.  

    Ooooh, sounds like something I’d like. I will check it out.

  3.  

    Just finished Foundation. Mind=blown.

    I LOVE Foundation. The books are absolutely amazing, and possibly the best sci-fi I’ve ever read.

    • CommentAuthorWiseWillow
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010
     

    I got very bored (very, very bored) and decided to try and list all the books I’ve read (excluding kid books, like Dr. Seuss. But YA books count). The idea is to reread the ones I liked, maybe think about some of the different ones. Here’s what I have so far. I also have read a bunch of Babysitters Club books and Boxcar Children books, but I’m not including them (I didn’t read them in order, so I don’t know which ones/how many I read).

    Redwall
    Mossflower
    Salamandastron
    Pearls of Lutra
    Martin the Warrior
    Marlfox
    Mattimeo
    The Bellmaker
    Outcast of Redwall
    The Long Patrol
    The Legend of Luke
    Lord Brocktree
    The Taggerung
    Artemis Fowl
    Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident
    Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code
    Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception
    Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony
    Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief
    The Sea of Monsters
    The Titan’s Curse
    The Battle of the Labyrinth
    The Last Olympian
    The Silmarillion
    The Lord of the Rings
    The Hobbit
    Harry Potter and the Sorceror’s Stone
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince
    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    Tales of Beedle the Bard
    Quidditch Through the Ages
    Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them
    The Odyssey
    The Iliad
    The Aeneid
    Beowulf
    The Canterbury Tales
    The Secret of the Old Clock
    The Hidden Staircase
    The Bungalow Mystery
    The Mystery at Lilac Inn
    The Secret at Shadow Ranch
    The Secret of Red Gate Farm
    The Clue in the DiaryNancy’s Mysterious Letter
    The Sign of the Twisted Candles
    The Password to Larkspur Lane
    The Clue of the Broken Locket
    The Message in the Hollow Oak
    The Mystery of the Ivory Charm
    The Whispering Statue
    The Haunted Bridge
    The Clue of the Tapping Heels
    The Mystery of the Brass-Bound Trunk
    The Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion
    The Quest of the Missing Map
    The Clue in the Jewel Box
    The Secret in the Old Attic
    The Clue in the Crumbling Wall
    The Mystery of the Tolling Bell
    The Clue in the Old Album
    The Ghost of Blackwood Hall
    The Clue of the Leaning Chimney
    The Secret of the Wooden Lady
    The Clue of the Black Keys
    The Mystery at the Ski Jump
    The Clue of the Velvet Mask
    The Ringmaster’s Secret
    The Scarlet Slipper Mystery
    The Witch Tree Symbol
    The Hidden Window Mystery
    The Haunted Showboat
    The Secret of the Golden Pavilion
    The Clue in the Old Stagecoach
    The Mystery of the Fire Dragon
    The Clue of the Dancing Puppet
    The Moonstone Castle Mystery
    The Clue of the Whistling Bagpipes
    The Phantom of Pine Hill
    The Mystery of the 99 Steps
    The Clue in the Crossword Cipher
    The Spider Sapphire Mystery
    The Invisible Intruder
    The Mysterious Mannequin
    The Crooked Banister The Secret of Mirror Bay
    The Double Jinx Mystery
    Mystery of the Glowing Eye
    The Secret of the Forgotten City
    The Sky Phantom
    The Strange Message in the Parchment
    Mystery of Crocodile Island
    The Thirteenth Pearl
    The Triple Hoax
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    Beloved
    The Scarlet Letter
    Brave New World
    Call of the Wild
    White Fang
    Anne of Green Gables
    Anne of Avonlea
    Anne of the Island
    Anne of Windy Poplars
    Anne’s House of Dreams
    Anne of Ingleside
    Rainbow Valley
    Rilla of Ingleside
    Catcher in the Rye
    Grapes of Wrath
    Great Gatsby
    Don Quixote
    Gone With The Wind
    Heart of Darkness
    Jane Eyre
    Lord of the Flies
    I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Wuthering Heights
    Tess of the d’Urbervilles
    Anna Karenina
    Pride and Prejudice
    Emma
    Sense and Sensibility
    Nineteen Eighty Four
    Robinson Crusoe
    Tale of Two Cities
    Their Eyes Were Watching God
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    Fahrenheit 451
    Like Water For Chocolate
    Pedro Paramo
    Kiss of the Spider Woman
    Henry V
    Titus Andronicus
    Romeo and Juliet
    Julius Caesar
    The Tragedy of Macbeth
    Hamlet, Prince of Denmark
    King Lear
    Othello, The Moor of Venice
    Antony and Cleopatra
    The Tempest
    The Merry Wives of Windsor
    Measure for Measure
    The Comedy of Errors
    Much Ado About Nothing
    Love’s Labour’s Lost
    A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    As You Like It
    The Taming of the Shrew
    All’s Well That Ends Well
    Twelfth Night or What You Will
    The Winter’s Tale
    Freckle Juice
    Tiger Eyes
    Just As Long As We’re Together
    Here’s To You, Rachel Robinson
    The Six Wives of Henry VIII
    The Princes in the Tower
    Children of England: The Heirs of King Henry VIII
    Elizabeth, The Queen
    Eleanor of Aquitaine: By the Wrath of God, Queen of England
    Henry VIII: The King and His Court
    Mary, Queen of Scots and the Murder of Lord Darnley
    The Lady Elizabeth
    Interpreter of Maladies
    Julie of the Wolves
    Lolita
    Lysistrata
    Mythology (Bulfinch)
    Oedipus Rex
    Animal Farm
    Silence of the Lambs
    Hannibal
    Hannibal Rising
    Red Dragon
    Eye of the Dragon
    Misery
    Candide
    Diary of Anne Frank
    Lady Chatterley’s Lover
    Madame Bovary
    Jude the Obscure
    Les Miserables
    A Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man
    Bridge to Terabithia
    No More Dead Dogs
    The Giver
    A Wrinkle in Time
    James and the Giant Peach
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    The BFG
    Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
    Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants: The Second Summer
    Stargirl
    Touching Spirit Bear
    Speak
    Alanna: The First Adventure
    In the Hands of the Goddess
    Woman Who Rides Like a Man
    Lioness Rampant
    Wild Magic
    Wolf Speaker
    Emperor Mage
    The Realms of the Gods
    First Test
    Page
    Squire
    Lady Knight
    Trickster’s Choice
    Trickster’s Queen
    Terrier
    Sandry’s Book
    Tris’ Book
    Briar’s Book
    Daja’s Book
    The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody
    A Fine and Pleasant Misery
    How I Got This Way

    Total: 222?

    These are the ones I could come up with off the top of my head.

  4.  

    I officially have no life.
    Ok, here goes:
    American Gods
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
    The Crucible
    The Scarlet Letter
    Best Served Cold
    The Blade Itself
    Perdido Street Station
    Black Man
    Brass Man
    The Engineer
    Altered Carbon
    Broken Angels
    Life of Pi
    Interview With The Vampire
    The Vampire Lestat
    The Road
    No Country For Old Men
    Water For Elephants
    The House of the Spirits
    The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers
    Daughter of Fortune
    The City of the Beasts
    The Grapes of Wrath
    The Bastard of Istanbul
    1984
    Lord of the Flies
    Marx For Beginners
    The Art of War
    The Odessey
    Ender’s Game
    Bless Me, Ultima
    The Ropemaker
    Sword Song
    Heretic: Betrayers of Kamigawa
    Detective Stories (Pullman)
    Greek Myths (Coolidge)
    The Trojan War (Coolidge)
    The Iliad (abbr., McCarty)
    Favorite Norse Myths
    D’Aulaire’s Book of Greek Myths
    D’Aulaire’s Book of Norse Myths
    Great Stories from the Eddas
    The Magical Worlds of The Lord of the Rings
    Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World
    Wolf of the Plains
    Druids, Gods, and Heroes from Celtic Mythology
    Characters From Tolkein
    The Golden Compass
    The Subtle Knife
    The Amber Spyglass
    Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
    Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
    The Eye of the World
    The Great Hunt
    The Dragon Reborn
    The Shadow Rising
    The Fires of Heaven
    Lord of Chaos
    A Crown of Swords
    The Path of Daggers
    Winter’s Heart
    Crossroads of Twilight
    Knife of Dreams
    The Gathering Storm
    A Game of Thrones
    A Clash of Kings
    A Storm of Swords
    A Feast for Crows
    King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table
    The Lord of the Rings
    The first 58 books of the Hardy Boys, I am not going to list them all.
    The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
    Prince Caspian
    The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
    The Horse and His Boy
    The Silver Chair
    The Magician’s Nephew
    The Last Battle
    Sandry’s Book
    Tris’ Book
    Briar’s Book
    Daja’s Book
    Magic Steps
    Street Magic
    Cold Fire
    Shatterglass
    The Hobbit
    The Silmarillion
    Artemis Fowl
    Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident
    Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code
    Artemis Fowl: The Opal Deception
    Redwall
    Mossflower
    Mattimeo
    Mariel of Redwall
    Salamandastron
    Martin the Warrior
    The Bellmaker
    Outcast of Redwall
    The Pearls of Lutra
    The Long Patrol
    Marlfox
    The Legend of Luke
    Lord Brocktree
    The Taggerung
    Triss
    Loamhedge
    Rakkety Tam
    James and the Giant Peach
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    Brave New World
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
    The Call of the Wild
    Flowers For Algernon
    Heart of Darkness
    The Catcher in the Rye
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    Fahrenheit 451
    Hamlet
    Romeo and Juliet
    Othello
    Diary of Anne Frank
    Eragon
    Eldest
    Cat’s Cradle
    A Wrinkle in Time
    A Wind in the Door
    Many Waters
    A Swiftly Tilting Planet
    An Acceptable Time

    Total: 222… what

    •  
      CommentAuthorSpanman
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010
     

    Reading The Supernaturalist by Eoin Colfer. So far, so good.

  5.  

    Oh, I love that book, Spanman!

    •  
      CommentAuthorMoldorm
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010
     

    The cunning twist near the end is good.

    •  
      CommentAuthorSpanman
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010 edited
     

    Oh, he’s all right. But a bit too handsomely brooding for my liking. XD

    Not that I’m opposed to handsomely brooding. But on a teenager it’s a bit much.

    EDIT: SPOILERS ARE NO.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPearl
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010
     

    Finished The Great Gatsby the other day. I probably won’t read it again, but I liked it. Fitzgerald really put a lot of himself in that book. Knowing a bit about him, I noticed a lot of similarities between his life and Gatsby’s.

  6.  

    Spanman, oh, you’ll love him in the end, you’ll see… cryptic

    •  
      CommentAuthorSpanman
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2010
     

    Oh, he was pretty good, I suppose. Something about the characters left something to be desired. D:

    Anyway, it was a pretty all right book and I’d give it a 7/10, I suppose.

    •  
      CommentAuthorDiamonte
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2010
     

    I just bought 7 books for $26 from my local book reseller. And they’re all in really good condition too. =]

    •  
      CommentAuthorRed Sky
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2010
     

    Finally, the last of the books I ordered from Amazon shipped in…

    The cover of Lanark is rather…unusual.

  7.  

    Last book I read was Maus 1. It was….sad and kind of strange. But good, and now I’m going to go insane until book two comes in from the library.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPuppet
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2010
     

    Yeah… Maus I\II is probably the best graphic novel I’ve ever read…

    • CommentAuthorNo One
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2010
     

    I love Call of the Wild and all the Tamora Pierce’s books (I’m still searching for more).

    Plus, Red Badge of Courage is a really interesting book… and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea…

    I like reading classics.

  8.  

    Finished The Great Gatsby the other day. I probably won’t read it again, but I liked it. Fitzgerald really put a lot of himself in that book. Knowing a bit about him, I noticed a lot of similarities between his life and Gatsby’s.

    Yeah. We studied it in LIt last year. Then we had to do oral presentations about different aspects of the book and I got context. It freaked me out. Even the Eggs are the same!

    Have just finished the first dragonriders of Pern book. It was okay, but I don’t get why the women were always portrayed as either hungry, horny, cunning or scared.

    And I started ASoIaF. It’s okay, but what’s with all the brother/sister stuff and underage sex?

    •  
      CommentAuthorApep
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    Same here (audiobook saves me time). As near as I can tell, GRRM is just wierd.

    • CommentAuthorPhantom
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    I have a couple of questions about Sherlock Holmes and Pride and Prejudice.

    Are they good book? Will they be a good read for someone like me?

    Doe-eye innocent expression

    •  
      CommentAuthorPearl
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    I finished The Eden Express. It was a very interesting read about Mark Vonnegut, who suffered from manic depression/schizophrenia, written by him from his point of view.

  9.  

    @ Phantom: Sherlock Holmes is not particularly difficult to read, as far as I can remember. Pride and Prejudice is AMAZING, but I didn’t read it until sixth or seventh grade, and even then, I had to have my dad at close hand to help me understand what was going on.

    • CommentAuthorNo One
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    Well. At least that answers my question, even though Phantom was the one who asked.

    • CommentAuthorPhantom
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    @SWQ: Thanks!

  10.  

    If you encounter any particularly good books for your age group, Phantom, feel free to send them this way. I have a ten year old brother who I would like to see reading more, but many of my suggestions are rather out-of-date or uninteresting to him, and I don’t really know what’s new and great right now.

    • CommentAuthorPhantom
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2010
     

    Hmmm… What genre of books? Just name a genre, and I’ll list some.

  11.  

    I think my brother likes fantasy.

    • CommentAuthorSlyShy
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Reading: Reading in the Brain, Kingdom of Infinite Space

    I recently finished rereading Hope Was Here, which makes seven times now…

    •  
      CommentAuthorMoldorm
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    I think my brother likes fantasy.

    My 8-year-old fantasy-loving cousin enjoys reading Inheritance and Beast Quest. I think he could do better, but he has so much fun.

    • CommentAuthorSlyShy
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Heh. On the topic of kids far too young to have developed taste: this blog makes me sad.

    •  
      CommentAuthorNorthmark
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010 edited
     

    I don’t know how advanced your brother is in reading, but I’d recommend some Jonathan Stroud. I think I read Buried Fire around his age.

    Also, reading the most recent post on Archmage Dragon Rider. It’s making me sad. :(

    edit: We had to get everyone out! So with my wand in my hand I yelled, “Teleportatia!“And Just like that, everyone disappeared. There was only one problem though. Tom and I were still there!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    “Darn this wand!” I yelled. “It only works to a certain limit!”

    There is some serious internet meme material here.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPuppet
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    xD

    It says the server for that blog is too busy.

    • CommentAuthorSlyShy
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Ouch. I guess that’s what happens when you try to host a website on Weebly. :-/

  12.  

    I bought the second Dexter book and The Lightning Thief yesterday.

  13.  

    @ Northmark- I tried to interest him in the Bartimaeus books, but I think they’re a little beyond him now. I think he’d also like The Chronicles of Prydain, but I cannot get my hands on the first book. So annoying when that happens.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Has anyone else read Austerlitz? I’m reading it for the Book Club under frantic recommendations of it being BRILLIANT and SUPERB and generally quotations on the cover telling me how MAGNIFICENT it is.

    I feel like I’m reading the original scroll of On The Road.

    I’m one hundred pages in and there has not been a single break. No chapter, no asterisk, nuffink. It is pure stream of consciousness. It goes off on tangents, and I forget how the tangent occurred.

    It’s exactly like playing Cheddar Gorge and it’s driving me up the wall. Occasionally I find myself drawn in, but then I remember that I’m going to have stop at a completely random place and won’t remember where that was the next time. Nor will I remember what’s being talked about.

    GNH. THIS IS NOT RECREATIONAL READING.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJabrosky
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    It might not count as a whole book, but I’m enjoying Robert E. Howard’s Beyond the Black River short story. Conan FTW!

    •  
      CommentAuthorSpanman
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Started Dune today. We shall see.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVirgil
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010 edited
     

    I feel like I’m reading the original scroll of On The Road.

    I have it. Haven’t really started yet.

    Started Dune. We shall see.

    Ditto. I’m almost over the initial hey-look-nothing-is-happening phase.

    •  
      CommentAuthorElanor
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    ...so I checked out David Starkey’s “Six Wives” for citations in my paper, and goddammit, here I am rereading it.

    Gnnnh. I’m going to have to buy it at this rate, damn wives.

    God, he had such a soap opera life.

  14.  

    i just finished A Game of Thrones. I am practically devastated at death. Why the HELL couldn’t he live?

    cries a lot of single tears

  15.  

    You ain’t seen nothing yet.

    Seriously.

  16.  

    Man. At least tell me that Jon Snow lives. Actually, don’t. Because if he dies then I’ll be really upset.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPuppet
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2010
     

    Yeah… let’s just say a LOT of people die.

    • CommentAuthorPhantom
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2010
     

    @SWQ: Well, I don’t know how much of an advanced reader your brother is, but I’d recommend the Narnia Chronicles, Call of the Wild and books written by Roald Dahl. I’d stay away from one of the books by Roald, I can’t remember which though.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2010
     

    I have it. Haven’t really started yet.

    So it was you that stole it from the museum? Jerk.

  17.  

    @Snow White Queen

    >I have a ten year old brother who I would like to see reading more, but many of my suggestions are rather out-of-date or uninteresting to him, and I don’t really know what’s new and great right now.

    How about the Edge Chronicles? Those are pretty cool.

  18.  

    bq.How about the Edge Chronicles? Those are pretty cool.

    Second’ed. I used to love those.

    Also, Redwall. I loved Redwall when I was ten.

  19.  

    I will be sure to pass those on. Thanks!

    •  
      CommentAuthorNorthmark
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2010
     

    Redwall

    ...I argue with my friend constantly over the merits of Redwall. Will I get punished here for saying I hate them with a passion? D:

    Also, I found that Buried Fire was an easier (and shorter) read than the Bartimaeus trilogy. They’re not related but I liked both of them.

    I’m guessing you’ve already suggested all the “required” stuff like Artemis Fowl?

    • CommentAuthorWiseWillow
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2010
     

    I liked Redwall. It is one of those books that doesn’t age well though. I still love Lord of the Rings, but Redwall now seems so silly.

    Have you recommended some Isaac Asimov short stories? Ooh, or The Lost Years of Merlin by T.A. Barron. Much better than it sounds, a very good book series.

  20.  

    My brother refuses to read Artemis Fowl. I’m at a loss, but maybe it’s hereditary, because I refused to read it at first. Then in the eighth grade, I somehow started reading and was hooked like that.

  21.  

    I’m guessing you’ve already suggested all the “required” stuff like Artemis Fowl?

    We should make a required reading list for II. Or at least a ‘books practically everybody has read’ list.

    Artemis Fowl
    A Song of Ice and Fire
    Bartimaeus
    The Lord of the Rings
    Narnia

    These are the ones I know everybody thinks are required.

    @SWQ: They’re like that, aren’t they?

  22.  

    I liked Redwall. It is one of those books that doesn’t age well though. I still love Lord of the Rings, but Redwall now seems so silly.

    They’ve got charm. I can’t hate them…. I grew up with them. But I have grown out of them.

    Also, Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book is a good one. He may like that.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    ...I argue with my friend constantly over the merits of Redwall. Will I get punished here for saying I hate them with a passion? D:

    Yes. Yes you will. >:|

    I liked Redwall. It is one of those books that doesn’t age well though.

    I don’t see how, there isn’t anything to age in the books. It’s not like some old childrens books from the 90s that talk about modems.

    But I have grown out of them.

    I believe that’s fundamentally impossible (for myself at any rate). :D I will never say I’ve grown out of books, my tastes change to include more genres but never exclude them. I still read them and enjoy them thoroughly, of course I’m well aware for the age range they’re written for, but that doesn’t detract from them quality-wise.

    • CommentAuthorWiseWillow
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010 edited
     

    Well, here’s what I mean about Redwall not aging well. Redwall itself has aged well. The book is still adorable, as is Mossflower. But the series of books has gotten very predictable. There’s always a group of friends, a prophecy about Martin’s sword, a riddle written by some barmy codger (who starred in a previous Redwall book) and so on. It gets formulaic. I never noticed the formula when I was younger, so it didn’t bother me. Now it does. The old Nancy Drew books have the exact same problem. I used to love them, and still do, but I don’t enjoy them the same anymore, because now I’m aware of the formula.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    But that’s just normal unoriginality. When you say things don’t age well it means that, well, for example, I was reading an SF novel from the ’50s and it talked about sending a telegraph from Mars to Earth.

    When things don’t age well, it means that, whatever it is, is linked firmly to the era it was written in, and it’s hard for a later reader to relate.

    Some pieces do age well, so, although it may be obvious which era it was written in (say, Narnia), it’s still relateable for later readers.

    Or even some works don’t have an era to restrict it to.

    • CommentAuthorWiseWillow
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Ok, it doesn’t grow up well? I’m trying to think of a better way of putting it.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Just unoriginal, to be honest. :D

    A lot of childrens books do follow formulas, because it’s easier for children to read (or some kind of made up stuff!), but Redwall took it too far.

    • CommentAuthorWiseWillow
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    See, but when you’re a kid, it usually doesn’t bother you. As you get older, you notice, and then it bothers you.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    I think that might just be a personal thing, then, maybe. Because it honestly doesn’t bother me.

    •  
      CommentAuthorFaux
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Reasons why I don’t go to book threads #2283: I do not wish to look like an uncultured f—-hag. Hag. Yes. :)

    ...I don’t even know if I’ve HEARD of Redwall. Sigh.

  23.  

    ...I don’t even know if I’ve HEARD of Redwall. Sigh.

    Where do you live? They are fairly popluar in America and Britian. Or they were at some point. Their popularity has dwindled, I think.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Their popularity has dwindled, I think.

    It doesn’t help that Jacques doesn’t add any original twists anymore. :/

  24.  

    It doesn’t help that Jacques doesn’t add any original twists anymore. :/

    That’s the main reason I stopped reading them. That and the characters were always stereotypical goody-goodies. Still, if I ever have kids, I’ll steer them towards Redwall. The first few are good, at least.

    •  
      CommentAuthorFaux
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Well, I’m from the States myself. Midwest.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPearl
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2010
     

    Yesterday I began reading Memoirs of a Geisha. I’m only about thirty pages in, so I’ll suffice to say that it seems promising.

  25.  

    Yeah, I read Memoirs...I didn’t like the end so much, to be honest, but I won’t spoil it for Pearl.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVirgil
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     

    Just got three more Foundation books. :3

    •  
      CommentAuthorRed Sky
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2010
     

    How do people find good fantasy books? I want to be able to pick out a good fantasy novel without it being part of a well established series I already know about, be able to find a good stand alone without it being a classic.

  26.  

    ^^ Seconded.

  27.  

    @ Red Sky: This is a problem I often encounter with fantasy as well. Recommendations is the way I usually go, and I often get them from people here.

    •  
      CommentAuthorElanor
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2010
     

    Juliet Marillier does marvellous historical fantasy—read her books set in Ireland, those are the best in my opinion.

  28.  

    I think I might have heard of her…maybe. But historical fantasy sounds awesome by default, so after I finish the 20+ books that I bought from India, I will look out for her.

  29.  

    So, I just finished American Gods, and I must say, I liked it very much. I personally thought that the ending was drawn out; it just kept going on and on and I really don’t know why Gaiman felt like he had to add all the extra stuff. But anyway, ‘twas quite good. I think I still prefer Neverwhere though…

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2010
     

    You’ve just reminded me, RVL! I got some book tokens for Christmas, so was browsing in Waterstones wondering what to get. I saw American Gods and immediately decided on that one, for £7.99. I then looked up and saw Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? put that on the list too, and noticed that it also was £7.99. Despite being only a fraction of the length.

    D:

    I swear books have gone up in price without me noticing. I must admit, I don’t normally go to bookstores anymore, obviously THIS IS WHY. Hmph.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPuppet
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2010
     

    I personally thought that the ending was drawn out; it just kept going on and on and I really don’t know why Gaiman felt like he had to add all the extra stuff.

    I felt the same way about Neverwhere, it just kept going and going…

  30.  

    Hmmm…. Maybe it’s just because I enjoyed Neverwhere a lot more, but I didn’t feel like that. I was actually interested in what happened to the protagonist afterwords, and in the book it was relevant, but in American Gods I just felt like there was no concrete end. It’s almost as if drawing out the end sort of killed it too.

  31.  

    Currently reading Maus 2.

    I also picked up Watchmen. I’ll start it tomorrow, probably.

    •  
      CommentAuthorVirgil
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     

    I enjoyed Neverwhere and felt it was a good length, but by the middle or so of American Gods I couldn’t finish. Oh well.

    •  
      CommentAuthorApep
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     

    Yeah, there’s a point in the middle of American Gods where the plot pretty much stopps for seemingly no reason.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPearl
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2010
     

    Last night I finished Memoirs of a Geisha and it was pretty good. The girl, Sayuri, had a very poetic mind, and I love the way that she compared things.

    “She would have noticed me no more than an autumn leaf falling to the ground.” That sort of thing.

  32.  

    Juliet Marrillier’s Wildwood Dancing books are also good.

    Also, I’m making my way through the Princess Diaries books again. They’re so fun and Mia is so likeable. I don’t care that they’re ya chick lit.

  33.  

    Bought Nation and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency a few hours ago. And currently, I’m planning on starting Wizard of Earthsea.

  34.  

    I’ve only read le Guin’s Annals of the Western Shore, which were okay, but forgettable.

    •  
      CommentAuthorRed Sky
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010 edited
     

    Being an confessing LeGuin fanboy…if you want to read something recent of LeGuin’s, I’d recommend Lavinia, since Annals of the Western Shore was just standard (though well written) YA Fantasy; she didn’t really push herself to her full potential in that trilogy like with most of her books. If you want to get into her older works, but not necessarily the series, like Earthsea, or the big Hainish universe with the Ekumen in it, I’d suggest you read The Lathe of Heaven.

    My favorites would be:

    The Lathe of Heaven
    Lavinia
    The Left Hand of Darkness
    The Dispossessed
    The Farthest Shore (third book in Earthsea)

    I find it interesting that most people on this board probably associate LeGuin with Earthsea when I feel that her more significant contribution has been in science fiction.

    •  
      CommentAuthorJeni
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     

    Aw, heck yeah. I’ve adored Le Guin’s SF novels. I just haven’t been able to get my hands on too many. :(

  35.  

    I finished Maus 2 last night. I read the last page about five times and shed many single tears. sniff

    Also, I hearby proclaim Watchmen to be awesome. I’m several chapters in. I’m in love with Rorschach. From the moment he first appeared, I had a bit of a crush on him…which is weird.

    • CommentAuthorNo One
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     

    I’ve just finished reading Thieves Like Us and Bloodline Cipher. They’re part of a trilogy and I thought they were first and second book, but it turns out to be first and third book. I almost chucked the Bloodline Cipher across the room in frustation when I found out.

    I must find the second book: Aztec Code. Or I’ll die ignorant of what happened between Tye and Jonah… how the hell did they suddenly become lovers!?

    Oh, the trilogy is by Stephen Cole. They’re not too bad, those books.

    @Marquis: Is the Earthsea book you’re planning on reading by Ursula? And if so, is it a quartet?

  36.  

    I believe so. Wasn’t Tehanu the last official book?

    Speaking of the Earthsea Cycle, I have to say the second is my favorite.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPuppet
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     

    Re-reading Hope was Here... Wonderful book, I started it last night and before I knew it I was on chapter 9.

  37.  

    Is the Earthsea book you’re planning on reading by Ursula? And if so, is it a quartet?

    Yes to the first question. And apparently, there are five of them.

    • CommentAuthorNo One
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     

    Huh?

    Huh? I must be missing something here as the book I have is called the Earthsea Quartet…

  38.  

    Checked, there’s actually five (and a bunch of short stories).

    A Wizard of Earthsea
    The Tombs of Atuan
    The Farthest Shore
    Tehanu: The Last Book of Earthsea (inaccurate title)
    The Other Wind

    • CommentAuthorNo One
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
     

    Oh. Ok, thanks.

    •  
      CommentAuthorPearl
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010 edited
     

    Also, I’m making my way through the Princess Diaries books again. They’re so fun and Mia is so likeable. I don’t care that they’re ya chick lit.

    I love those books. :D

    And also I finished The Notebook. It was a good read, though the middle freaked me out a bit, and I am on to read Brave New World.

    •  
      CommentAuthorRed Sky
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
     

    You have to read the short story collection, Tales of Earthsea, before you move onto The Other Wind. One of the short stories contains a character that holds a significant enough role in The Other Wind to warrant an understanding of her background.