Are you ready for more of Atticus “outwitting” the cops? No? Well too bad! Here’s Chapters 15 & 16! But if it makes you feel any better, I’ll tell you right now that someone will get shot.

Welcome to the opening paragraph!

I thought Sundays were supposed to be relaxing. As a male citizen of America, I’m entitled on Sundays to watch athletic men in tight uniforms ritualistically invade one another’s territory, and while they’re resting I get to be bombarded with commercials about trucks, pizza, beer, and financial services. That’s how it’s supposed to be; that’s the American dream.

I know this is a joke, so I won’t spend too much time on it, but it again highlights my problem with Atticus’s character: he doesn’t want anything. Atticus was just given a sacred mission by his goddess and he starts the next chapter telling us he’d rather be at home watching football. Can we petition for a new protagonist? One who actually wants to get off his butt every once in a while?

Also! Fun fact! Atticus isn’t an American citizen!

Wait, what?

…I’m not really a citizen of America. Mr. Semerdjian called the INS on me once, in fact. I waved my hand in front of the agents’ faces and said, “I’m not the Druid you’re looking for.” They were not amused. I waved my hand again and said, “Move along,” and they got out their handcuffs. That’s when I got out my slightly scuffed yet soigne illegal documents, prepared for me by Leif Helgarson, Bloodsucking Attorney-at-La. And after the INS agents went away, that’s when I sent Overon over to poop on Mr. Semerdjian’s lawn for the first time.

Yes apparently the first thing he did was use Star Wars references when the government came knocking at his door. Not once, but twice. Isn’t Atticus so funny? Isn’t he hilarious?

LAUGH DAMNIT

…why is he not a citizen? I know it’s probably easier all around, considering that because he can’t exactly submit a birth certificate, he’d have to submit fake papers sooner or later. I get it, I guess, and forging the papers makes things easier, but none of the reasons are gone into. Just like with the abusive father he mentioned earlier, it’s just dropped on us without a reason other than as a tangent in his rant about how Americans are lazy on Sunday.

This leads into how his feud with his neighbor started, and he keeps acting like it’s just a grumpy neighbor when it really reads as if Semerdjian is completely and totally correct in assuming that there’s something wrong with Atticus and he’s heroically trying to catch him on anything. It’s like, yeah, Al Capone did a lot more than tax evasion, but that’s what they nailed him on because that’s what they could find records of.

Also why is the Lebanese man the one freaking out about his Irish neighbor being an illegal immigrant? I don’t want to get anywhere near current events in the US about people being anti-immigrant, it’s just that this is not the way you’d usually expect these things to go.

Turned out he was just mean, and dog shit on his lawn turned him into Flibbertigibbet, a regular Lebanese Tom o’Bedlam.

Alright either go with modern expressions or old fashioned ones. Stop hopping back and forth between them. Also isn’t a Tom o’Bedlam a wandering crazy person? Mr. Semerdjian doesn’t wander around being crazy. He sits in his house terrified of his neighbor who gets up to no good with his godlike powers!

So Atticus is calling a contractor to fix the door Brighid melted through on her way in when the police roll up! Detective Jimenez (the Good Cop) and Detective Fagles (the Bad Cop) pop out of their cars along with way too many officers to be believable. Atticus hangs up and tells Oberon to hide invisibly while he deals with them. And then Atticus’s werewolf lawyer Hal Hauk arrives.

Hal slows down and bothers Fagles by explaining to the audience that the cops have already searched Atticus’s residence with a warrant, and the werewolf lawyer posted there has several complaints. Their warrant authorized them to search for the wolfhound that killed the park ranger, and they definitely went through a lot of places that a wolfhound wouldn’t fit, like “in a drawer or a dresser or in kitchen cupboards” so he’ll file a complaint and maybe try to sue the police department. This tips Atticus off to the fact that what they’re really looking for is Fragarach and most definitely working for Aenghus Og.

This has to be the tenth time the book has told us this, btw.

The cops deny anything like what Hal describes happened, and if it did it’s not like they could prove it! And then Hal’s all like, “Oh yeah, well my associate has VIDEO of your search on his phone!” which surprises the cops. And I understand that it’s not too hard to hide a camera phone if you’re standing in place, if he apparently wandered around following the cops while they searched the house it’s a bit stupid that they didn’t notice they were being filmed.

So Hal tells the cops that they will continue the search for a large dog, and only a large dog, and if they start poking through small cabinets or something, then he’ll sue you.

Fagles is not very happy about being made a fool of.

In Fagles’s defense, he didn’t know he was trying to play dominance games with a werewolf.

What the fudge does that have to do with anything? What does Hal being a werewolf has to do with his skills as a lawyer? They’re not playing dominance games, they’re arguing about laws! And I know that maybe, arguably, one person is “dominating” the other in this conversation but that has nothing to do with werewolves! It’s just… weird. I don’t want to hear about the lawyer having dominance over the Bad Cop, Hearne! That brings up uncomfortable mental images!

Atticus decides to look at Fagles with his Magic Vision, and he sees that a “band of green knotwork wreathed Fagles’s skull, almost like one of those Roman laurels. That was the primary method by which he was being controlled. But interlaced with those strands, I saw, were very fine blue and red threads.”

Basically: green knotwork around his head is mind control from Aenghus. The blue and red? He has no idea. But he can’t break the green binding without tripping those as well, and if he doesn’t know what those do it might be dangerous to do.

Fagles actually sees the sword. But that should be impossible, because Fragarach is magically cloaked. OHES NOES! Atticus deduces that the spellwork around Fagles’s head lets him see not through any glamour (as that way, he’d see through the cloaking on Oberon right away), but specifically the cloaking spell on Fragarach. But this means that he had help from the one who made the cloaking spell in the first place, and that was Radomila, the leader of the witch coven in town. Which means (GASP) that the witches are working with Aenghus!

Why are we acting like this is shocking? We’ve just been told this by Brighid.

I think what Hearne’s going for is that Atticus is undecided, because he has evidence that they’re not siding with Aenghus (like what Malina told him and… not much else) but he also has evidence that they are (Emilya’s subplot and Brighid’s exposition). It’s waffling back and forth, and Atticus doesn’t know for sure which it is. And like, okay, I get that. But the text acts like it’s a big reveal every time it comes up. Atticus will tell the reader something like “What? The witches are working against me?!” as if it’s a surprise when A) most of the evidence points that direction anyway and B) Atticus keeps telling Oberon and the audience that witches cannot be trusted.

Of course, if he had half a brain, Atticus might come up with a hypothesis that fits the facts, like, say, “Some of the witches are working for Aenghus and some of them aren’t,” which is what ends up being the case, but Atticus doesn’t have half a brain so we’re left with this waffling back and forth.

Anyhow, Fagles freaks out about the sword, but Hal tells him it’s not the dog so he has no reason to pay it attention. Fagles insists that it’s a concealed weapon, and that needs a permit. Hal, who has started filming this exchange with his phone, points out that a sword isn’t a concealed weapon and so it doesn’t require a permit.

Whoa. That’s why Hal gets $350 an hour. Quoting Arizona statutes, complete with their soul-destroying legalistic sentence structure? That’s Druidic.

Except… it’s really not. Considering earlier Atticus tells the audience that he practices sword fighting with the werewolves and his vampire lawyer, and they live in a college town, this probably comes up a lot. In any case, it’s not an obscure thing you couldn’t find on Wikipedia. I basically found the same information in high school when I was looking up whether it was legal to own a switchblade in my state. My point is this: while Hal’s being a good lawyer here, it’s not super impressive that he knows this off the top of his head.

Atticus decides that the blue magic around Fagles’s head is what allows him to see through the sword’s cloaking spell. So he decides he’s going to break that spell. He doesn’t know for sure, mind you, and that will also break the green and red bands, and he also has no idea what that’ll do to Fagles. But he’s going to do it anyway. Why?

It was one of those decisions you make when you have too much testosterone bubbling around in your system, or when you’ve been raised in a culture of ridiculous machismo, as I was.

[throws up hands]

What am I supposed to do with this?

“Yeah, it was a stupid decision, but I make stupid decisions a lot because I was raised to be a macho man .”

For starters, this isn’t out of character in the least. Atticus does stupid things without thought all the time. You remember when he went hunting with Flidais, the goddess who has control over animals, with his dog? And he turned into a dog while doing it? And when the hunt started he felt some magic being worked, but he ignored it because Reasons.

Atticus doesn’t think much about anything he does. He’s working entirely on impulse, and while some of his moment-to-moment impulses are handy, like defending himself in a fight, mostly they’re not, because he keeps making terrible decisions, like hunting with Flidais, or killing Bres, or not skipping town the moment he heard that Aenghus Og was rolling in for his head.

And part of what makes this so infuriating is that the book insists that Atticus isn’t like this. Over and over again we’re told that he’s really careful and paranoid and clever. Hal calls him the most paranoid person he’s ever met. Atticus mentions how paranoid he is all the time. Every time he makes a stupid decision, the other characters excuse it as being a good decision so that he doesn’t have to face consequences, just so we can hear how clever and smart and handsome Atticus is.

And now this is thrown at us, where Atticus tells us, “Yeah, it was a dumb decision, but I do that all the time because of my upbringing.”

This reminds me of the bit in Angelopolis (never a good sign) where Valko decides to release the Watchers. It’s a terrible decision, and there’s no reason for him to do it other than Plot. When his coworkers call him out on it, he just responds with “Yeah, it’s dangerous, but we do dangerous stuff in our everyday work. Now let’s do this!” And of course Valko gets killed soon afterward.

Except Atticus won’t get killed because he’s a Mary Sue and I hate him! Here he is, after telling us the entire book that he’s oh-so-smart, informing us that he just makes dumb decisions all the time. No it’s not quite as bad as the Angelopolis example is, because let’s be real, very little is as bad as Angelopolis (ONE OF THE VILLAINS EATS PENISES AS HER SCHTICK) because this has some buildup, but it’s not very good.

So, using his magicks, Atticus breaks the spell around Fagles’s head. And it basically blows back and hits everyone in the head.

…definitely a trap, the concussive sort. I felt a whump against my face, like getting hit unexpectedly full force with a pillow, and I saw Hal’s head snap back abruptly. He fell over backward, snarling in surprise. Fagles yelped and grabbed at his head, and then as Hal and I were recover—Hal fed-faced and eyes a bit yellow, his wolf close to the surface—Fagles went completely batshit and drew his gun on me.

So this makes Fagles even more angry because he’s convinced that Atticus hit him, despite not being next to him. The way it’s phrased, “Fagles went completely batshit” is meant to make Fagles sound like he’s an unreasonable douche who just snapped. And he is unreasonable, and a douche, yeah, but let’s look at his point of view: he knows Atticus is a villain, he knows he has what he’s looking for, and then he just gets whacked in the head by a mysterious force in his shop? Of course the guy’s going over the edge.

Also, Atticus’s lawyer’s about to wolf out. Apparently the blast of this magic blast was mitigated, somewhat, by the magic wards on the shop, and the blast didn’t bother Atticus as much because he’s got his super special awesome mega kewl chocolatey-covered amulet that has more powers than Mulch Diggums.

Fagles is freaking out, which again makes sense considering his grip on reality is unravelling right before his eyes, and though he insists that Atticus hit him Hal says that the security cameras will prove that he didn’t. But they’d probably also show Atticus doing something wouldn’t they? The breaking of spell is described as “the gentlest of mental tugs” but are you telling me there are no accompanying hand gestures? If nothing else, he’s staring at Fagles’s head when it happens.

Hal tries to calm down Fagles and get him to put down the gun. But on top of everything, Fagles can no longer see Fragarach, so he starts freaking out and yelling about the sword. This isn’t helped by Atticus going “What sword?” and pretending that the sword was never there to begin with. And since Fagles was the only one that could see it, no one could back up his claim that there was a sword there. Hal points out that he only argued with Fagles about the sword because as a lawyer, that’s his job, but from his position he can’t see the sword or the position it’s meant to be in.

Oberon gives us this:

I think his panties are getting twisted.

Tee-hee, a detective is being driven to homicidal insanity and is waving a gun around! Isn’t it hilarious?

LAUGH DAMNIT

[I should make that a count.]

The other detective, Jimenez, puts away his weapon, and all the cops except for Fagles chillax. Fagles is still upset about something hitting him in the head. Hal suggests that it was “a freak gust of wind,” as if that makes any sense.

Detective Jimenez basically says “Well the dog’s not here, let’s pack it up boys!”

Fagles gritted his teeth in frustration, and the green wreath around his head flared menacingly. And that’s when he shot me.

This would be cathartic if I actually thought this would be a threat to Atticus. But since we know that since Chapter 2, he’s been made mostly immune to death.

Chapter 16!

You know that old saw about your life flashing before your eyes at the moment of death?

Except we know that you’re not dead, so shut up.

The first thing I thought was, “Oh no! I’ve been shot!” in the immortal words of the golden protocol droid when he got lased with special effects in a mining colony.

A public service announcement from your not-so-friendly neighborhood sporker: pop culture references are not jokes. Just because you referenced Star Wars two chapters in a row, that doesn’t mean you’re clever. It doesn’t even mean you’re a nerd. Please stop.

There’s some more talk about him getting a highlight reel of his life in his head. Shortly afterward, Oberon telepathically freaks out, and Atticus assures him that he’s fine.

All the other police officers pull their guns on Fagles, because he just shot Atticus. Fagles is losing his mind, because he didn’t mean to do this; he was basically being controlled by Aenghus in that moment to shoot Atticus. But he can’t exactly say “An Irish god made me do it,” and I don’t know how aware he is of how he’s being used. So he doesn’t know what to say other than that a voice in his head told him to shoot Atticus and take the sword, which Hal keeps denying exists.

“There was someone in my mind. Telling me what to do. He wanted the sword.”

Which makes me question: why didn’t Aenghus do this before? Chapter 5 indicates that this is a thing that the Irish gods can do, just popping into someone’s head to tell them to do something. Here he seemingly enthralls Fagles, or at least pressures him into doing it. So if Aenghus can just find people with guns, and talk them into shooting Atticus… why didn’t he do that? It’s a bit late now, considering that Atticus is immune to death and all, but Aenghus has had over two thousand years to pop a cap in Atticus this way. All he had to do is grab a few guys with machine guns and give Atticus some lead injections! BOOM! Problem solved!

We’re meant to think that Aenghus has this elaborate plan to ruin Atticus before killing him, but that falls apart once this incident happens, because here Aenghus has his agent try to execute Atticus the second he knows where the sword is. We’re meant to believe that Aenghus had the option of more or less possessing a minion to assassinate someone this entire time, but he’s only used it now in circumstances that wouldn’t have worked.

Weirdly though, Atticus actually doesn’t have any healing power on him; despite no indication until now, he says that he’d worn out all the extra backup power in his amulet with camouflage and breaking the spell on Fagles’s head (yet another reason it was a dumb idea to do it in the first place). As long as he touches the Earth, he’ll be good, but that’s going to be difficult with the police here as he’s got to react like a man that’s just been shot.

Fagles insists he didn’t do it, but Good Cop Jimenez points out that, uh, he kinda did, as far as they can tell, and there’s a security camera and a lawyer so there’s no way this goes well for Fagles. Fagles actually begins crying, insisting that he wouldn’t do it, but Jimenez reminds him that they all saw him, and tells him to put down the gun. This jars Fagles into being defiant, and he decides that he’d rather go down fighting than go to prison, I guess?

“Oh, you’re going to shoot me, are you?” he sneered, and then he became unhinged. “Well, that’s better than going to prison! And even better than that would be taking you with me!”

We’ve never been given any indication that Fagles really hates Jimenez, by the way. He just decides he’ll happily die if he can take Jimenez with him.

So, uh… Fagles screams and raises his gun, and all the other cops shoot him. He’s dead now, I guess. This is confirmed later when Hal “sidestepped…over the body of Detective Fagles” so he’s really dead.

Okay then.

And again, this whole thing with Fagles? It’s really dark, yeah? A man being driven insane by having himself dragged into some immortal feud he knows nothing about? Atticus himself gives a “Poor Fagles.” This whole thing isn’t played for laughs, and I have to give Hearne minimum credit for that. But again, this is something very heavy and the book isn’t giving it that much time to develop in order to treat it with the weight that it should have. The other cops act more worried about getting in trouble than they do about shooting a coworker.

Jimenez asks that they call the paramedics. Hal checks on Atticus, who tells him he needs to get outside to touch some ground, or his lung will keep filling with blood. Hal tells Jimenez that they need to get Atticus outside because “He needs air.” but Jimenez points out that he should probably stay put until the medics arrive. Hal just picks him up and…

…and he hooked an arm under my shoulders and knees and scooped me up as effortlessly as he would an Italian runway model. Silly cop, I don’t need your help; I have a werewolf on retainer.

That’s… a weird and oddly specific simile? Are Italian runway models easy to pick up?

Hal puts him outside so he draw on the Earth Power to heal himself. He tells Hal to get the sword to him, and that he needs to clean up all the blood in case the witches come by and do something with it. That includes the blood that’s on Hal’s suit. Hal protests that the suit costs three thousand dollars, but Atticus assures him that he’ll cover it.

Yeah, Atticus can just throw out three thousand dollars?. But his neighbor’s suspicious of him because he’s just a jerk. Right.

Atticus also tells Hal to take care of his dog, and let him ride home with him in his Beemer. Hal agrees, but also says that Oberon better not do anything to his leather seats.

“Sybarite,” I said.

“Ascetic,” he retorted, and he got up to go open his car door.

Atticus owns his own shop, sells antique books, lives in a nice house in the suburbs where he regularly entertains women, and can throw out three thousand dollars with barely any notice. That’s not remotely ascetic. Like, I know that this is probably meant as a joke between friends, but considering how often the book tells us that Atticus is paranoid and clever and down-to-Earth, I feel the need to counter this.

Atticus instructs Oberon to go with Hal for the night; he has to be taken to the hospital because, healing or no, they have to remove the fluid from his lungs. I would say this actually makes sense and give credit to Hearne for thinking this one out, but then Oberon agrees to the plan as long as he gets a date with a French poodle, and I’m reminded of the dog’s poodle fetish. You ruined it, Hearne.

Then Perry, Atticus’s goth (or possibly Goth) employee, who just now got back. When he last was here, he was worried about the giant bird that was the Morrigan, so he says

“Holy shit, boss!” he said. “Did that big fucking bird do all of this?”

Tee-hee, isn’t this book hilarious?

LAUGH DAMNIT

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Comment

  1. The Smith of Lie on 13 August 2019, 09:51 said:

    Are you ready for more of Atticus “outwitting” the cops? No? Well too bad!

    Hah! You underestimate my level of preparedness. I have a whole bottle of hard liquor here, just for such an emergency… You know what, it’s Hounded, I’ll go grab an additional one. Or three. Just to be on the safe side.

    Yes apparently the first thing he did was use Star Wars references when the government came knocking at his door. Not once, but twice. Isn’t Atticus so funny? Isn’t he hilarious?

    The fact that the book makes light of immigration issues and the actions of immigration authorities certainly does not look bad in hindisght of 2019. Nope. No siree. Though given how seriously Hearne took The Troubles, I doubt it’d make a difference.

    Just like with the abusive father he mentioned earlier, it’s just dropped on us without a reason other than as a tangent in his rant about how Americans are lazy on Sunday.

    And it doesn’t seem to even be relevant in any way shape or form either to the plot or to his character. It is one of those little elements of being immortal that usually gets handwaved as something taken care off-screen. But I guess we needed more padding. Can’t have all that break-neck, fast paced action tire the readers.

    Also why is the Lebanese man the one freaking out about his Irish neighbor being an illegal immigrant?

    Without going into much detail, some immigrants develop anti-immigrant stances as a sort of “close the doors behind me” view. I doubt this what Hearne had in mind, given how mean spirited his writing is towards the minor characters (to be honest at this point I have devleoped a reverse Hanlon’s Razor towards him).

    So Hal tells the cops that they will continue the search for a large dog, and only a large dog, and if they start poking through small cabinets or something, then he’ll sue you.

    On one hand this is one of the most sensible ideas Atticus and his Lawyers presented while dealing with Police. On the other I strongly suspect that police searches do not work that way and it’d probably wouldn’t work. But at least it is not aggressively idiotic.

    Can’t wait to see how the situation degenerates from here.

    It’s just… weird. I don’t want to hear about the lawyer having dominance over the Bad Cop, Hearne! That brings up uncomfortable mental images!

    “What is the safe word?”
    “There’s no safeword today!”
    whip crack

    Why are we acting like this is shocking? We’ve just been told this by Brighid.

    Can you imagine how it’d look if Hearne wrote Star Wars? Obi-Wan would drop that Vader is Luke’s father during their first meeting, then he’d remind him that every other scene and once Vader and Luke met we’d still get the dramatic “reveal”. And then once per scene Vader would sent Luke text messages reminding him who he is.

    Atticus keeps telling Oberon and the audience that witches cannot be trusted.

    He has his head so deep up his ass, that he can’t even follow his own advice.

    he also has no idea what that’ll do to Fagles. But he’s going to do it anyway. Why?

    Because he has no respect for human life and probably secretly hopes that messing with the red stuff will make Fagles head explode, showering everyone in rain of gore and skull fragments. Or it’ll at least drive him irreversibly crazy, sapping away all his sanity and humanity, leaving only a weeping wreck of a man, capable only of gibbering and sobbing in unbearable, soul crushing depair.

    It was one of those decisions you make when you have too much testosterone bubbling around in your system, or when you’ve been raised in a culture of ridiculous machismo, as I was.

    Called it!

    (ONE OF THE VILLAINS EATS PENISES AS HER SCHTICK)

    Ok, that is gross and weird. But you must admit that image of her eating Atticus whole is an uplifting one.

    the blast didn’t bother Atticus as much because he’s got his super special awesome mega kewl chocolatey-covered amulet that has more powers than Mulch Diggums.

    You are too haesh on Atticus here. He didn’t get to witness a cop’s head burst like a tomato. That almost certainly ruined his whole day and harshed his vibe.

    The breaking of spell is described as “the gentlest of mental tugs” but are you telling me there are no accompanying hand gestures? If nothing else, he’s staring at Fagles’s head when it happens.

    This is one of things that always made me wonder when reading Urban Fantasy books. If the population at large does not believe in magic or supernatural and it is accepted scientific consensus that this stuff does not exist, how would a supernatural act of destruction be treated by legal system. Somethign inobvious, like here. Even average mortal lawyer would argue that Atticus making a vague gesture towards Fagles could not reasonably be expected to cause the reaction it got.

    Hal suggests that it was “a freak gust of wind,” as if that makes any sense.

    This reminds me of this bit from Evil Dead musical.

    Except we know that you’re not dead, so shut up.

    Hey, we can at least hope!

    Which makes me question: why didn’t Aenghus do this before?

    Because that’d be a smart thing to do and we can’t have that.

    So, uh… Fagles screams and raises his gun, and all the other cops shoot him. He’s dead now, I guess. This is confirmed later when Hal “sidestepped…over the body of Detective Fagles” so he’s really dead.

    Despite Aenghus being invovled I am gonna say this one is another innocent dead because of Atticus. If he didn’t mess with the spells it’d probably wouldn’t happen. But hey, Fagles was an ass towards him so I guess we should cheer for him beaing dead.

    Atticus himself gives a “Poor Fagles.” This whole thing isn’t played for laughs, and I have to give Hearne minimum credit for that.

    Well, color me impressed. Given the gravitas given to death so far and callousness Atticus displayes I was almost expecting him to dance a happy little jig on Fagles’s grave.

    LAUGH DAMNIT

    No. Never again.

  2. Juracan on 14 August 2019, 15:17 said:

    You underestimate my level of preparedness. I have a whole bottle of hard liquor here, just for such an emergency… You know what, it’s Hounded, I’ll go grab an additional one. Or three. Just to be on the safe side.

    Probably safe. It gets pretty crazy sometimes.

    The fact that the book makes light of immigration issues and the actions of immigration authorities certainly does not look bad in hindisght of 2019. Nope. No siree. Though given how seriously Hearne took The Troubles, I doubt it’d make a difference.

    I mean… no. It doesn’t look good. And re-reading this chapter in 2019 is kind of cringey because of that. That being said, it could have been worse, and right now the cringe is because he uses stupid pop culture references rather than anything else.

    Without going into much detail, some immigrants develop anti-immigrant stances as a sort of “close the doors behind me” view. I doubt this what Hearne had in mind, given how mean spirited his writing is towards the minor characters (to be honest at this point I have devleoped a reverse Hanlon’s Razor towards him).

    No, no, I get the “Close the doors behind me” view, I just don’t think this is it. The most common occurrence of that is from people of similar ethnic groups? Like, and I really hope this doesn’t end up in a flame war (not from you Smith), Hispanic-American citizens sometimes have this huge thing against Mexican immigrants who crossed the border illegally; and the same with Middle Eastern-American citizens.

    Part of it is being associated with people considered criminals in popular consciousness; I know a lot of Hispanic Americans are of the attitude of “Why are these criminals going and sullying the perception of our culture by being illegal immigrants?” I want to iterate that that’s NOT a fair thing to say, and obviously immigration is a lot more complex of an issue than that. But that’s how a lot of people see it.

    Mr. Semerdjian, though, has no reason I can think of to even suspect that Atticus is an illegal immigrant, so this just comes out of nowhere? It’s mentioned several times that Semerdjian is Lebanese. Why does he have a particular interest in Atticus’s citizenship status? Why would it even come up, compared to every other sketchy thing that Atticus has done? Does he think that Atticus will sully the reputation of Lebanese people?

    It’s not impossible Semerdjian has this attitude, but it’d be really friggin’ weird if he did.

    Like, imagine if a Hispanic character was complaining about British immigrants coming to America and stealing all the jobs. It’s not out of the realm of possibility that someone did this, but it’s just not how you’d expect the conversation to go.

    On one hand this is one of the most sensible ideas Atticus and his Lawyers presented while dealing with Police. On the other I strongly suspect that police searches do not work that way and it’d probably wouldn’t work. But at least it is not aggressively idiotic.

    I mean… no. Not really. I think the cops would just do whatever and let it sort out in court if it came to that. A lot of writers underestimate how much people care about the truth, and the cops could easily handwave them searching in places a dog wouldn’t fit with an excuse like “We were looking for any signs that a dog could have been here, like a doggy treat or something.”

    bq..

    “What is the safe word?”
    “There’s no safeword today!”
    whip crack

    AAAAAAAAAAAAGGGGGGH

    Can you imagine how it’d look if Hearne wrote Star Wars? Obi-Wan would drop that Vader is Luke’s father during their first meeting, then he’d remind him that every other scene and once Vader and Luke met we’d still get the dramatic “reveal”. And then once per scene Vader would sent Luke text messages reminding him who he is.

    This is kind of funny? Because Hearne totally has written for Star Wars before.

    Because he has no respect for human life and probably secretly hopes that messing with the red stuff will make Fagles head explode, showering everyone in rain of gore and skull fragments. Or it’ll at least drive him irreversibly crazy, sapping away all his sanity and humanity, leaving only a weeping wreck of a man, capable only of gibbering and sobbing in unbearable, soul crushing depair.

    I mean… you’re not wrong that he has no respect for human life, and Fagles does end up dead because of it.

    This is one of things that always made me wonder when reading Urban Fantasy books. If the population at large does not believe in magic or supernatural and it is accepted scientific consensus that this stuff does not exist, how would a supernatural act of destruction be treated by legal system. Somethign inobvious, like here. Even average mortal lawyer would argue that Atticus making a vague gesture towards Fagles could not reasonably be expected to cause the reaction it got.

    I don’t know, and this book doesn’t really explore it. I do wonder about it a lot too though? I remember there being some episodes of Grimm in which they catch the killer but the killer definitely killed using some supernatural method? And they can’t exactly prove it? It gets through because all the main cop characters are in on the Masquerade, but I wonder how that would have flown in court.

    Because that’d be a smart thing to do and we can’t have that.

    Tagline for the book.

    Despite Aenghus being invovled I am gonna say this one is another innocent dead because of Atticus. If he didn’t mess with the spells it’d probably wouldn’t happen. But hey, Fagles was an ass towards him so I guess we should cheer for him beaing dead.

    See, I don’t know how we’re supposed to view this action? Because even Atticus seems to pity Fagles a bit, but not that much. It’s kind of this detached, “Well sucks to be him,” sort of thing. So I don’t know if we’re meant to cheer, or just be like, “Oh good, another obstacle out of the way. Moving on!”

    Given the gravitas given to death so far and callousness Atticus displayes I was almost expecting him to dance a happy little jig on Fagles’s grave.

    Well we still have a ways to go so there’s still time.