The fire in the goblet had just turned red again. Sparks were flying out of it. A long flame shot suddenly into the air, and borne upon it was another piece of parchment.

Automatically, it seemed, Dumbledore reached out a long hand and seized the parchment. He held it out and stared at the name written upon it. There was a long pause, during which Dumbledore stared at the slip in his hands, and everyone in the room stared at Dumbledore. And then he cleared his throat and read out—

“Harry Potter.”
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, pages 270-271

Previously on Adapt or Die: Harry Potter Edition:

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Mike Newell decided against the studio’s original idea of adapting the extremely long book into two separate films to be released several months apart, figuring that he could cut enough of the book’s bulky subplots to make a workable film. It was Alfonso Cuarón, the director of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004), who convinced him.
IMDb trivia

Because making one book into two movies is just silly.... But seriously, this is from IMDb, so it may or may not be true. Two movies for four, five, and six looks great to me in retrospect, but they honestly could have been done better as single movies if they were just a wee bit longer. Another twenty minutes (making it about three hours long) would have done nicely, or just putting in important things from the book rather than extending scenes that don’t need extending and adding things that don’t need to be there. Hell, just not changing things when they were better and made more sense in the book would have made a huge difference. I also read that Chris Columbus wanted to make Philosopher’s Stone into two movies. Either that or make it 3 ½ hours long with an intermission. Just for the record, I am not a fan of those ideas. Seriously, Chris, a Peeves scene was the only major thing you left out.

This review will be on the movie adaptation of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (obviously). If you haven’t either read the book or seen the movie, I’d suggest you do at least one of those things before reading on. As always, I will do my best to mark spoilers, but I might slip up. For information on grading and spoilers see here.

Basic Story

Once the trio gets to Hogwarts, they learn that Hogwarts will host the Triwizard Tournament this year, a tournament which hasn’t been played in many, many years. For the tournament, two rival magical schools (Beauxbatons and Durmstrang) come to Hogwarts to compete. A champion from each school will be selected to compete in the tournament, and to enter to be a champion, a student must put their name into the Goblet of Fire. Oh, and they have to be at least seventeen. This last rule is new and has been added as an extra safety precaution. When the three champions are announced, a fourth name comes out of the Goblet. The name is that of Harry Potter. He too must now compete for the Triwizard cup, even though he is only fourteen and will be the second Hogwarts champion. With the help of friends and teachers, Harry gets through the first two tasks in the tournament, but the third is not quite what it seems. By the end, the wizarding world will be changed forever.

I understand that a lot of things had to be cut to fit into the time slot, but still, the biggest flaw to me was the removal of a key subplot:

No S.P.E.W.ing

“Not spew[.] It’s S-P-E-W. Stands for the Society for the Promotion of Elfish Welfare.”
—Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 224

S.P.E.W. is an organization that Hermione starts up after witnessing house-elves being treated poorly. She discovers that house-elves work in the kitchens of Hogwarts and also clean the castle, which infuriates her. In case you are unaware, house-elves are small, sentient, magical creatures that are used as slave labor and are typically passed down through families. They can only be freed if their masters present them with clothes. Worse, no one seems to care. Most of the house-elves don’t even seem to care. But Hermione cares. A lot. She is continually at odds with Harry and Ron about the issue and holds up Dobby as an ideal that all house-elves should aspire to. She makes up badges, and decides that Ron and Harry are treasurer and secretary, respectively. She also badgers many other characters to join, most of whom tell her to leave the house-elves alone because they (the house-elves) are happy the way things are. The omission of this subplot is my biggest gripe because it deletes it from the next volumes as well.

Casting

One day, not so long ago, a group of filmmakers read Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. When they read the description of Bill’s hair, they wept openly at its beauty.

…And so began the year of bad hair.

No, seriously, nearly all the boys have horrible hair in this movie. Okay, in my opinion. I know I only put Harry and Ron on here (and Harry’s picture doesn’t show it well), but look at Neville, Fred, and George.


Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter: Ugh. Hair. Ahem…. Anyway, I thought that Daniel was much improved here. He had to do some more difficult scenes (particularly at the end), and he did a very nice job. He looked younger than the other champions, like he was supposed to.


Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley: His hair was even worse than Harry’s. On the acting side of things, he was really good at acting pissy when he was mad at Harry. He also did a good job when he was obsessing about Viktor Krum. Rupert is still my favorite trio actor at the moment.


Emma Watson as Hermione Granger: Emma’s hair actually looked very nice, but it wasn’t supposed to. I finally got why my teacher didn’t like that she looked pretty before the ball. It really does give it less impact. I still say that the lack of bucky beaver teeth is a bigger deal than the lack of bushy hair, but whatever. Her acting was good, and she wasn’t really annoying at all in this one. I liked her Yule Ball scenes, even though the end of the ball was different for her than it was in the book. She did a good job.


Michael Gambon as Albus Dumbledore: Why am I reviewing Gambon again? Because Dumbledore is not that angry! He doesn’t grab Harry and yell at him about putting his name in the Goblet of Fire. I will say that this may have not been so much Gambon’s fault as it was the writers and the director, but still. Dumbledore’s character was just really off. He also was way too angry when Ending Spoiler he was questioning Crouch. The book specifically states how he’s really calm then, and his voice shakes for the first time when he talks about Cedric’s parents. End Spoiler


Brendan Gleeson as Alastor Moody: He was really good, and he certainly looked like Moody. For some reason I was imagining the magic eye on the other side of his face, but never mind. I’m also not sure it’s supposed to be secured with a strap, but that was probably for actor convenience. Though, the eye didn’t move around enough. It mostly moved like a normal eye. It’s supposed to move around a lot and look at different things all the time. That adds to the creepiness. His leg is supposed to be wooden, I believe, so I was imagining a peg leg or something, but movie Moody had more of a metal foot thing, which did not immediately look fake, which again, may have been for actor convenience. Again, I though the acting was really good (“Technically, it’s a ferret.”). Ending Spoiler There was something that I thought about that I also thought about when I was reading the book is that Crouch seems too much like the real Moody. The book explains it by having Crouch keeping Moody around to interview and observe, but the movie has no such explanation. Also, since the movie has Crouch being so damn psychotic all the time, it seems like he’d have trouble pretending to be someone else for long periods of time. End Spoiler


Robert Pattinson as Cedric Diggory: Isn’t Pattinson so much more attractive as Cedric than he is in those adaptations of The-Series-That-Must-Not-Be-Named? Yes, yes he is. He also has considerably more acting ability. And I’d much rather listen to him talk in this accent than the other. It’s really a shame that poor Robert can’t be remembered for being Cedric Diggory instead of You-Know-Who (hint: it’s not Voldemort). Ah well. I really like Rob in this movie. Ending Spoiler I would like to say something about book Cedric now. When Dumbledore is talking to the students about Cedric, I was feeling all sad. And then he said that he exhibited all the qualities Hufflepuffs are known for, and I thought, “Find!” End Spoiler


Clémence Poésy as Fleur Delacour: She’s not nearly as bitchy as book Fleur, but that probably is more about how movie Fleur was written than the acting. She’s pretty enough to be Fleur. The only thing appearance-wise is her hair. It’s supposed to be like a silvery blonde (which makes me think of a more platinum blonde, but Poésy’s is more just regular blonde; this isn’t that important, though, especially since the Veela are left out anyway. Poésy doesn’t have that many scenes, but I suppose she does all right in the ones she does have.


Stanislav Ianevski as Viktor Krum: Krum is not supposed to be attractive. Hermione even says in the book that he’s not attractive, and everyone only likes him because he’s famous. Ianevski’s eyebrows are not bushy enough. I thought his acting was okay, though. But I have another gripe with the writers: Krum is not an idiot! He seemed to be at least of average intelligence in the book, and Hermione actually likes him. In the movie, she says he like talking to wood or something, which implies that he is just a dumb jock, but he’s not supposed to be like that. Urgh. He’s not stupid!


Tom Felton as Draco Malfoy: I like him as a ferret. But I suppose, the ferret was probably played by a ferret rather than Tom Felton, though. I bet the Harry Potter Wiki has the name of the ferret. They have a bunch of names of animals who played in the movies. Anyway, Felton has a much smaller part, it seemed, than he did in the other films. I didn’t find his hair appalling like I did Harry and Ron, though. Acting was fine, as usual.


Frances de la Tour as Olympe Maxime: Ze acting iz good. She iz a leetle too tall. She iz supposed to be ‘Agrid’s size, but she iz taller in ze film. She does not ‘ave olive skin, az she does in ze book.


Predrag Bjelac as Igor Karkaroff: His part is also diminished. I suppose he looks all right. His goatee does not curl, and it really does cover his chin pretty completely. The acting is fine.


Katie Leung as Cho Chang: She is pretty, and she has long, black hair and brown eyes. There aren’t any freckles, but I don’t care. Her acting is decent, though she doesn’t have a ton of lines.


Miranda Richardson as Rita Skeeter: Perfect. She looks perfect, and she acts perfect. It’s a shame she didn’t get to do nearly as much as she does in the novel. Even her voice is amazing for the role.


Roger Lloyd-Pack as Barty Crouch: Well, since he’s kind of playing two characters in one (Ludo Bagman and Barty Crouch), it’s hard to gage his casting and performance. He has to perform the duties of both characters, so he really ends up being neither, but a completely different character instead. Oh yeah, and he had to do all the stuff Percy did in the book because the filmmakers didn’t see fit to include Percy in the film. I guess Lloyd-Pack does a fine job acting. I dunno. His character is completely different, however. He’s a heartless bastard in the book, for one, but he’s not in the movie. “It destroyed Barty to send his son to Azkaban.” Yeah, sure it did.


The Doctor Ten David Tennant as Bart Crouch, Jr.: Look at that straw-colored hair. Wait, no, it’s not there. He doesn’t have freckles either. That stuff isn’t that important, though. What is important is how his character was changed. Ending Spoiler Why in the hell is so psychotic? In the book, Barty is begging his father not to send him to Azkaban, practically balling as he screams that he didn’t do it. In the movie, he’s all, “Hello, Father” in his creepy-ass voice. I guess he probably didn’t care about going to Azkaban as much because his cell was bigger on the inside. I mean, I love Tennant, and I’m sure he was told to do a lot of what he did (though watching him on Doctor Who, some of Barty’s behavior could have very well been his idea), but it’s just wrong. He only looks kind of psycho under Veritaserum. Movie Barty acts way too insane to seem capable of pretending to be Moody for all that time. Plus, they give him away in the very beginning. They show him with Voldemort and Wormtail. Then once the viewer sees who Tennant is, they know he really was a Death Eater. End Spoiler More on that later, I suppose.


Jeff Rawle as Amos Diggory: I added him even though he has a really small part because I think he’s amazing Ending Spoiler when Harry comes back with Cedric’s body. His screaming “That’s my son! That’s my boy!” is simply heartbreaking. End Spoiler Great job.


Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort: I almost forgot to add him. Seriously. What is wrong with me? Anyway, He does very, very well, in my opinion. Some more fun IMDb trivia for ya: They did his nose with computer effects to make it creepier, and the reason he doesn’t have red eyes is because Fiennes thought that his eye expression would portray the evil and madness better.

Missing Plotlines

Dudley’s Diet

The movie cuts out the Dursleys completely, but in the book, Dudley has been put on a diet because he’s gotten so fat that his school uniforms don’t come in his size. To make Dudley feel better about it, the whole family is put on the diet, including Harry. But Harry doesn’t stick to the diet. Instead, he sneaks candy and cakes, sent to him by his friends, from under his floorboards in his room.

This diet is also why it’s so easy for Fred and George to get Dudley to eat the Ton Tongue Toffee, a joke candy they invented that makes a person’s tongue grow. Mr. Weasley has to fix the situation, though it’s quite difficult because the Dursleys are terrified of him.

Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes

Fred and George are very focused on making money because they will be done with Hogwarts soon. Mrs. Weasley does not like how they are going about this venture. They are attempting to start Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes, a joke shop. They create various products, such as Ton Tongue Toffees, Canary Creams, and fake wands.

This obsession with money-making leads the twins to bet their entire savings to Ludo Bagman, who isn’t even in the movie, that Ireland will win the Quidditch World Cup, but Viktor Krum of Bulgaria will catch the snitch. They win, but Bagman neglects to pay them (he does pay them in leprechaun gold, which disappears), or even to give them their money back. Ending Spoiler They find out in the end that Bagman is in a lot of trouble with the goblins about money and that he will not be paying them. So, Harry gives them his Triwizard winnings that he neither wants nor needs to open their joke shop because he thinks they’ll all be needing a few laughs soon. The only stipulation is that they must buy Ron some new dress robes. End Spoiler Without this subplot, there isn’t really an explanation for how the twins get enough money, coming from a very poor family, to open their shop.

Siriusly

Sirius has a much bigger part in the book than he does in the movie. In the movie Minor Spoiler Harry only talks to Sirius one time when he appears in the fire. End Spoiler I think they mention writing to him a couple of times. Maybe not. In the book Sirius tells Harry to write to him to tell him about any strange things happening at Hogwarts and to keep him posted on the tournament. He even Book Spoiler comes back to Britain and lives in a cave near Hogsmeade to be closer to Harry and what’s going on at Hogwarts. He also stays with Harry in the hospital wing, in dog form of course. End Spoiler Sirius also tells the trio to call him “Snuffles” when they talk about him to avoid being overheard.

More on Mr. Crouch

Crouch’s back-story is really delved into in the book, but it’s completely butchered in the movie. Okay, not completely, but quite a bit. In the book it is discovered that Spoiler Crouch sent his only son to Azkaban on suspicions of torturing Neville’s parents (his father was an Auror) after Voldemort’s fall. Barty (his son) screams and pleads with his father to spare him, saying that he didn’t do it, all this as Barty’s mother sobs next to Crouch. In the movie, Dumbledore says that Crouch was really messed up by sending his son to Azkaban, that he was really upset over it, but in the book, he wasn’t. He never really loved his son much, or so it seems. He loved his wife, and that’s why he helps Barty escape Azkaban. Mr. and Mrs. Crouch go in to visit Barty. Mrs. Crouch and Barty both take Polyjuice Potion to turn into one another, as Mrs. Crouch is near death. Barty and Mr. Crouch leave, and Mrs. Crouch, while continuing to take Polyjuice Potion, dies in Azkaban shortly thereafter. Then Mrs. Crouch’s death is staged and Barty is forced to live under an invisibility cloak under the influence of the Imperius Curse and watched by the house-elf Winky. Bertha Jorkins eventually discovers Barty during a visit to the Crouch home, so Mr. Crouch puts a memory charm on her. After a while, Barty is able to fight the curse and escapes during the Quidditch World cup, which is the real reason Winky is freed. End Spoiler

There is also a current plot with Mr. Crouch that is left out of the movie. Book Ending Spoiler After Bertha Jorkins is murdered, Voldemort puts Crouch under the Imperius Curse to make him act like everything’s normal. He does this for a while, but then Crouch starts fighting the curse, like his son did, which makes Voldemort think it’s no longer safe for him to actually go to work. Instead, he makes him write letters with instructions to his assistant, Percy Weasley, and an illness is made up for the reason why Crouch hasn’t been around physically. Percy takes over for Crouch as judge of the tournament. Crouch eventually escapes from his house and wanders into the Forbidden Forest, where he is found by Harry Potter and Viktor Krum. While Harry goes to tell Dumbledore, Krum stays with Crouch. When Harry returns with Dumbledore, Crouch is gone, and Krum has been stunned, presumably by Crouch. Later, we find out that Barty Jr. is the one who really stunned Krum, and he killed his father. End Spoiler

Rita Skeeter, Read All About It

So, yes, the film does have Rita Skeeter, but her role is very much diminished. In the movie, she does the one story about Harry Potter being twelve (loved that part) and the other one about Hermione dumping Harry for Viktor. Rita ends up being banned from Hogwarts, yet she still gets all these juicy details on everyone. In the book, she also does a story about Minor Spoiler Hagrid being a half-giant, information that is left out of the movie entirely. End Spoiler This really upsets Hagrid and has him holed up in his cabin for days. And after the Hermione article comes out, Hermione starts to receive hate mail, also left out of the movie. Even Mrs. Weasley believes it and treats Hermione differently until Harry is able to clarify that Hermione is not, nor has she ever been, his girlfriend. She also does a story about Harry being crazy, Ending Spoiler which contributes to Fudge not believing him about Voldemort’s return. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler In the end, Hermione finds out that Rita is an unregistered animagus, and that’s how she’s been overhearing everyone’s conversations. Rita can turn into a beetle. Hermione traps her in a jar and will only release her when they get off the train home, and Rita has to agree not to write any articles for a year. End Spoiler

Missing Scenes

I’m sure I missed some of them, but oh well. Feel free to point them out in the comments.

The Riddle House

The explanation of the Riddle House is excluded, for obvious reasons. It would require a narrator to do properly, and the audience can get the gist of what happened to the Riddles without having the whole background explained to them anyway.

Dursleys

All the scenes with the Dursleys are cut. These cuts are reasonable, but there’s still some cool stuff that would’ve been nice to see onscreen. The main thing (other than Dudley’s diet) that occurs at the Dursleys is Harry getting invited to go to the Quidditch World Cup with the Weasleys. They arrive at Number 4 Privet Drive to pick up Harry via Floo Powder, and Dudley’s tongue grows due to him consuming a Ton Tongue Toffee left behind (on purpose) by Fred and George. Mr. Weasley has to fix it, but it’s a challenge because the Dursleys are terrified of him.

The Burrow

All the scenes at the Burrow (except when they leave the Burrow) are cut. There’s no fun family dinners or floating chairs. They don’t go off to play Quidditch in the yard, and there’s no Pigwidgeon hollering in the background. And, again, there’s nothing about Fred and George inventing things and trying to make money.

The Quidditch World Cup

Sure, sure, we see that they’re there, but I suppose it’s too much to see the damn match, huh? They didn’t have to show the whole thing. Just some of it. But no. We don’t get to see Krum’s Wronski Feint. We don’t even see the Veela. The Veela are the stunningly beautiful women who are Bulgaria’s mascots, except when they’re pissed, they turn into scary bird-things and tear apart leprechauns. The leprechauns aren’t really shown either. There are fireworks things for Ireland, but they appear to be just regular (wizard) fireworks, rather than the work of tiny, bearded men who rain down gold. And yeah, there is no gold either. Also, the film has Ron and Harry supporting Bulgaria, and, while they do like Krum, they are Ireland fans, just like the other Weasleys. Duh.

Something else missing from the Cup is that the Weasley clan gets to sit in the Ministry box on the invitation of Ludo Bagman, who, wait for it, doesn’t exist in the film! When they do sit in the box, the Malfoys are there to be all snarky and asshole-ish. In the movie, the Weasleys sit in the nosebleeds. When the Malfoys walk by, Draco brags about how they get to sit in the box. This annoyed me because the Weasleys did get to sit in the box. They did.

Amos’s Fiery Head

Back at the Burrow, Amos Diggory’s head appears in the fire (apparently another nifty wizard communication method). He tells Mr. Weasley that he needs to go help Mad-Eye Moody because he set enchanted dust bins on some Muggles he thought were wizards coming after him. This introduces this form of communication. He also discusses everything that’s been going on at the Ministry since the Dark Mark was conjured.

Explaining the Triwizard Tournament

Dumbledore announces the Triwizard Tournament a couple of months before the other schools arrive. It’s at the big feast at the beginning of the year. In the movie, the tournament is explained after the other schools arrive, which is right after school starts.

“Predicting” the Future

There is a part in the book when Professor Trelawney assigns a bunch of homework because she’s mad that Harry didn’t take one of her predictions seriously. The class has to use the positions of the planets to predict what will happen to them over the next month. Well, Harry and Ron try this for a while and then decide to just make up terrible things that will happen to them. They get full credit.

Waiting for Beauxbatons and Durmstrang

In the movie, after everyone arrives at Hogwarts, the other schools arrive as well… like right after. Despite not having been told about the Triwizard Tournament, none of the students seem to have a reaction other than “Look at that!” One would think that a giant carriage landing on the grounds unbidden and a ship rising out of the lake would be cause for concern given the school’s history with unfortunate happenings, but no. They just think it’s cool. In the book, the kids have to stand out in the cold and wait for the other two schools to arrive. Then when they do, it’s exciting because they weren’t expecting them to arrive in quite that way.

The Weighing of the Wands

While this scene is partially included in Rita Skeeter having a photo shoot and interviewing Harry, it does not include the reason why the group was assembled: so that Olivander can examine the champions’ wands to make sure they are functioning properly.

Accio!

Harry and Hermione practice Accio for hours and hours to prepare Harry for the first task because he never learned it properly in Flitwick’s class. The film doesn’t even mention that he had trouble with it. It doesn’t even show that they just learned it this year.

Chillin’ with Viktor

After the champions are show the third task, Viktor takes Harry off to the woods to chat about Hermione. He wants to know if there’s anything going on between Harry and Hermione because she talks about Harry all the time. Harry says that’s just because they’re friends. Viktor seems satisfied with this. Book Spoiler Then Mr. Crouch stumbles out of the woods and rambles about needing “Weatherby” to do things for him and also about Voldemort and needing to speak to Dumbledore. I explained the rest of what happens in Missing Plotlines, above. End Spoiler

Dream Number Two

While in Divination class, Harry passes out and has another dream about Voldemort. Book Spoiler In it, Voldemort is saying that he will have to feed Harry to Nagini instead of Wormtail because Wormtail’s mistake worked itself out. Then Harry goes to tell Dumbledore. End Spoiler Rita Skeeter uses this incident as proof of Harry’s insanity and instability, that and him being able to talk to snakes. Instead of including this dream, the film just shows the first dream several times. Because that’s the same.

Additional Pensieve Sequences (Book and Movie Spoilers)

The movie only shows the one with Karkaroff, and it kind of cobbles one of the others onto that one. It doesn’t have the one where Bagman is questioned about being a Death Eater because Bagman doesn’t exist in movie Potter. Anyway, Bagman gets off after a vote from the jury because he’s an awesome Quidditch player. Crouch is pissed. The film also leaves out the sequence with Barty Crouch, Jr. begging his dad to believe that he didn’t torture Neville’s parents. He’s on trial with two insane people, whom I think were the Lestranges. I’ve already hit the begging versus crazy shouting point a couple of times, so I won’t do it again. In the film Karkaroff just turns in Barty along with that guy from the Department of Mysteries, though they do leave out all the useless names Karkaroff gives and how he starts to get worried.

Curse You!

Harry practices a bunch of curses on Ron and Hermione is preparation for the third task.

Families Welcome! (Very Minor Book Spoiler)

The families of the champions are allowed to come watch the third task. Harry is called to greet his “family” even though he doesn’t have one, and he doesn’t want to go. Cedric calls to him that they’re waiting on him. Harry briefly wonders if the Dursleys have somehow come to watch him compete. Then he is greeted by Bill and Mrs. Weasley. It is an aww moment. They say that Charlie wanted to come but couldn’t get off work. Harry spends the day showing the two around the castle while everyone else is taking final exams, which the champions are exempt from (this is not mentioned in the movie).

The Parting of the Ways (Ending Spoilers)

Mrs. Weasley set the potion down on the bedside cabinet, bent down, and put her arms around Harry. He had no memory of ever being hugged like this, as though by a mother. The full weight of everything he had seen that night seemed to fall in upon him as Mrs. Weasley held him to her. His mother’s face, his father’s voice, the sight of Cedric, dead on the ground all started spinning in his head until he could hardly bear it, until he was screwing up his face against the howl of misery fighting to get out of him.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 714

After Barty Jr. is found out and Harry has told Dumbledore and Sirius everything (another missing scene, but the viewer didn’t really need that stuff rehashed, so it’s okay), he goes to the hospital wing. Sirius (in dog form) goes with him, and the Weasleys and Hermione are there when Harry arrives. Madam Pomfrey gives Harry something to help him sleep a dreamless sleep.

A few hours later, Harry is awoken by shouting. Fudge, the Minister of Magic, is arguing with Professor McGonagall. Fudge brought a Dementor into the castle because he was scared of Barty, Jr. (who was tied up and secured). The Dementor performed the kiss on Barty (sucking out his soul through his mouth), so now Barty would be unable to testify about anything. Mrs. Weasley is mad that they’ve woken up Harry, and then Dumbledore shows up. He wants to know why McGonagall is no longer guarding Barty. She tells him, and then he goes off on Fudge. Worse yet, Fudge refuses to believe that Harry really saw Voldemort return to power. He thinks that Harry is crazy and untrustworthy because of Rita Skeeter’s articles, so he uses that as his reason, but he is mostly just in denial. If he tells everyone that Voldemort’s back, they won’t like it. He’ll be unpopular. Dumbledore says they’ve reached a parting of the ways here since Fudge won’t face the truth. This is the type of thing that makes Dumbledore yell.

And then, there’s Mrs. Weasley’s hug of awesome. I just love Mrs. Weasley.

Cedric’s Parents (Ending Spoilers)

In the book, there is a scene where Harry explains to the Diggorys exactly what happened to their son. They are thankful to him for telling them. Amos is crying, and Cedric’s mother is very stoic-ish. Harry offers them his Triwizard winnings because he doesn’t want them and Cedric should’ve won anyway. Mrs. Diggory refuses because it would be too painful to take them and probably because she feels bad for Harry just like he feels bad for her.

The Train Home

As always, the train ride home is left out. It’s okay really because all the important things that happen on the train ride home in Goblet of Fire are part of storylines that were cut. The rest is just the kids joking around and being happy, a stress release.

Missing Characters:

Ludo Bagman

Ludo Bagman is quite important in the book. In the movie, Crouch mostly fulfills Bagman’s role. Bagman is a lot more fun-loving and laid-back than Crouch. He also used to play Quidditch for England, endearing him to the Weasleys even though Bagman is terrible at his Ministry job. He even gets the Weasleys into the Minister’s box for the Quidditch World Cup. Ludo is also involved in a subplot with the twins (see Missing Plotlines, above). He also continually hounds Harry about the tournament, attempting to give him advice on how to complete the tasks. Book Ending Spoiler In the end, it is revealed, by Fred and George, that Bagman was only trying to help Harry because he had bet the goblins that Harry would win the tournament, and if he won, he could pay off his debts. Even though Harry does win the Triwizard Tournament, the goblins get Bagman on a technicality because he technically ties with Cedric for the win. End Spoiler

Dobby

The elves Dobby and Winky were cut due to time constraints. However, if you watch carefully in the first campsite scene, right after Ginny points to something and says “Look!” you can see two House Elves riding on llamas. They go by very fast, so they’re hard to see.
IMDb trivia

Well, I’ll have to re-watch that scene. In any case, Dobby is sorely missed. He was another casualty of getting rid of S.P.E.W. This omission was a mistake because the lazy illiterates people who haven’t read the books don’t have time to get as attached to Dobby. They see him in Chamber of Secrets, and then he’s gone until Deathly Hallows. This gives him less impact as a character.

Dobby’s absence does give Neville more to do, which is strange because Neville has had more to do in other books that was cut out of the films, but when he doesn’t have as much to, the filmmakers give him more to do. I’ll get back to the business with Neville later.

Winky

Winky is another house-elf. She belonged to Mr. Crouch until he freed her, much to her dismay, after the World Cup for supposed insubordination. It is how Mr. Crouch treats Winky that brings Hermione’s attention to the plight of house-elves. Winky also serves as a foil for Dobby. Dobby loves his freedom and is held up as an example for other house-elves to follow, while Winky is ashamed of her freedom, being a proper house-elf, and mostly cries all the time.

Bertha Jorkins

Even though she doesn’t make a direct experience, Bertha Jorkins is pretty important. Bertha is a dumb loudmouth who likes to gossip, basically. She also works at the Ministry in Ludo Bagman’s department. Well, she disappears and dear Ludo, bless him, decides not to look for her for a very long time because she’s just so darn forgetful, Book Ending Spoiler which is because of Crouch’s memory charm. Anyway, Wormtail, who is supposed to be dead, runs into her at an inn, and of course, he has to take her captive so she won’t go blabbing about him. Voldemort and Wormtail torture her and remove the charm to learn about the Triwizard Tournament and all that stuff. We also see her as a memory in the Pensieve and as one of the apparitions that comes out of Voldemort’s wand during Priori Incantatem. End Spoiler

Percy Weatherby Weasley

Early drafts had Ron’s estranged brother Percy appearing in a key supporting role but it was written out in the final drafts. In an interview, Chris Rankin, who plays Percy, revealed that his contract of the franchise stipulates that he must appear in four films; the first three, with the option of appearing in either this movie or the next one, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007). Given the fact that Percy appears much longer in the latter, he opted out of the film in favour of appearing in the next one.
IMDb trivia

I can’t tell is this means that Rankin only wanted to be in four films or if he was only allowed to be in four films. Whatever. The point is that Percy does not appear in this film. In the book, Percy takes over a lot of Crouch’s duties when crouch “falls ill.” Percy’s actions in Goblet of Fire set up how he acts in later installments. It shows his extreme ambition at the expense of other things. It’s too bad they left him out.

Bill Weasley

Bill is the oldest Weasley brother. He has a ponytail and wears an earring. He’s the cool brother. He attends the Quidditch World Cup with the rest of the Weasleys (except for Mrs. Weasley). Minor Book Spoiler He also comes with Mrs. Weasley to watch Harry compete in the third task as Harry’s “family.” End Spoiler

Charlie Weasley

Charlie is the second oldest Weasley brother. He works with dragons in Romania. He also attends the Quidditch World Cup. Minor Spoiler And Charlie is involved with bringing in the dragons for the first task. End Spoiler

Cedric’s Mom

In the movie, Cedric’s dad is shown a few times, but in the book, he also has a mother. She comes in at the end to watch the third task. Ending Spoiler She is also there when Harry is explaining what happened in the graveyard when Cedric died. Cedric’s dad is crying, but his mother is not, as her grief was “beyond tears.” She is the one who refuses the Triwizard winnings that Harry tries to give the Diggorys. End Spoiler

Sybill Trelawney

She’s all mystical and predicts death some more in the book. I’d be okay with her being cut for the movie if a key event did not take place in her class. Of course, this event isn’t in the movie at all, so it doesn’t matter if she’s there or not. She gives a lot of homework in this one.

Vernon Dursley

This is the first movie to not show the Dursleys. They feature in the book in the very beginning, where they are visited by the Weasley family who come to pick up Harry for the Quidditch World Cup. This was omitted from the movie to save screen time for the main plot.
IMDb trivia

So, this decision I actually kind of agree with. The Dursley part isn’t necessary. It’s just… traditional, I guess. If they had to cut something, that is a pretty easy thing to cut. I would have really liked to see his expression when he got the letter covered in postage stamps and when a bunch of redheads burst through his fireplace.

Petunia Dursley

Another consequence of the lack of Privet Drive, she doesn’t do much in the part of the book she is in anyway.

Dudley Dursley

I would’ve liked to see his ton tongue.

Colin Creevey

He’s in the book a little. He talks about how his little brother Dennis is going to be in Hogwarts this year and how he hopes he’s in Gryffindor. He tries to fix the Potter Stinks badges but fails.

Dennis Creevey

There’s a little kid named Nigel in the movie who wants Ron to get him Harry’s autograph. I really don’t understand why they didn’t just call that little boy Dennis. It would have made sense, and the kid looked like he could’ve been Dennis. Anyway, Dennis is Colin’s little brother, who is sorted into Gryffindor. He also falls in the lake on the trip to the castle, which he is really excited about. He and Colin have similar feelings toward Harry.

Pigwidgeon

Pigwidgeon is Ron’s tiny, hyperactive owl that Sirius gave him. He’s not in the movie… unless he’s in the background somewhere. He’s mentioned quite a bit in the book.

Small Changes That Don’t Really Matter

They still wear Muggle clothes too much.

The movie refers to Peter Pettigrew as Wormtail, which also happens in the book, even though the film for Prisoner of Azkaban never said who the Marauders were. The people who haven’t read the books would not know that he was a Marauder or that he had that nickname.

To be clear, just because I put down something as a change does not mean that I think it’s a bad change. You’ll probably be able to tell if I think a change was specifically good or bad. A lot of them are just there. So, here we go:

Ending Spoiler In the movie, Barty Crouch, Jr. is in Harry’s first dream about Voldemort, but in the book, it’s just Voldemort and Wormtail. It was stupid to put him in the dream because it gives away that he’s guilty before we even know. And they showed him casting the Dark Mark, so there’s no doubt who cast it. End Spoiler

The movie leaves out the Muggle who runs the campsite where everyone is staying for the World Cup. There is not mention of how everyone is supposed to blend in, and there aren’t any wizards in inappropriate Muggle clothing.

In the book, the girls have their own tent at the Quidditch World Cup, but in the movie, everyone sleeps in the same tent.

The movie leaves out all the souvenirs everyone buys at the World Cup (except for some hats). They leave out the little Krum figurine Ron gets.

I don’t think the movie shows that the Death Eaters are levitating Muggles.

When all the chaos happens at the Cup, the kids are all supposed to stay together in the book, while Mr. Weasley and his three oldest children try to help the Ministry stop the Death Eaters. In the movie, Mr. Weasley just says that Fred and George are in charge of Ginny and then leaves. I did wonder why a thirteen-year-old needs someone to watch her, but the fourteen-year-olds don’t, but whatever. Anyway, instead of Harry, Ron, and Hermione getting separated from Fred, George, and Ginny, Harry gets knocked out and separated from everyone. This was stupid. I hated him getting knocked out and trampled instead of going with Ron and Hermione and seeing someone conjure the Dark Mark.

Moody turns Malfoy into a ferret in the castle in the book and outside in the film. In the film, he also makes ferret Malfoy go down Crabbe’s pants (I think it was Crabbe).

In the book, Moody demonstrates the Unforgiveable Curses on three spiders (one for each curse), while in the movie he only uses one to show all three curses. I think it actually makes more sense to just use one spider.

In the book, Moody subjects everyone in the class to the Imperius Curse to see if they can fight it, but he doesn’t do this in the movie.

In the book, Hermione provides the name of the last Unforgiveable Curse, but in the movie she refuses to say it, though she looks like she does know what it is.

In the movie, Beauxbatons is an all girls school and Durmstrang is an all boys school, but in the book they are co-ed. I think they should have shown that they were co-ed in the film.

A scene where the Beauxbatons and Durmstrang students show off and perform in the Great Hall was added to the film.

In the book, the Beauxbatons students sit with the Ravenclaws, and the Durmstrang students sit with the Slytherins, but in the movie, they kind of just sit off to the side of the Great Hall.

The movie has Dumbledore yell at and assault Harry after his name comes out of the Goblet of Fire. Dumbledore would never behave like that towards Harry.

The movie leaves out when Fleur and the other champions think Harry is delivering a message (rather than that he has been chosen as a champion as well), and it leaves out Fleur calling him a little boy when she finds out he’s competing.

The film gives the students more time to put their names in the Goblet than the book does.

There is no mention of the other students that grow beards attempting to trick the Goblet in the film, and Fred and George don’t go to the hospital wing to get theirs removed.

In the movie, Rita Skeeter decides that Harry Potter is twelve and continues to write that he is (which is funny, and I like it), but in the book, she writes his correct age.

Minor Spoiler The movie doesn’t show that Karkaroff has also seen the dragons, but it does imply that he knows. End Spoiler

The movie adds a scene where the Gryffindors learn to dance for the Yule Ball.

The movie never says that the Yule Ball is only for fourth years and higher unless a younger student comes as the date of an older student (like Ginny did with Neville).

In the movie, Parvati and Padma Patil are not identical (though they do look quite similar considering that the actresses are not even related) and are both in Gryffindor. In the book, they are identical and Parvati is in Gryffindor, while Padma is in Ravenclaw. They should have kept her in Ravenclaw.

The movie leaves out Parvati’s friendship with Lavender Brown, replacing Lavender with Parvati’s sister, Padma.

The movie leaves out Harry practically begging Parvati to find Ron a date for the ball.

Ron doesn’t try to remove the ruffles from his robes like he does in the book.

In the book, Hermione’s dress robes are blue, but in the movie, they are pink. Also, the girls’ dress robes look more like plain dresses, while the boys’ dress robes look a lot like tuxedo-robe hybrids (Harry’s were fairly plain in the book, and they were green).

Hermione is upset and crying on the staircase at the end of the Yule Ball in the movie, but she is happy and has a wonderful time in the book.

Neville is a good dancer in the movie, but he steps on Ginny’s feet in the book.

Dumbledore explains to Harry that his scar hurts him when Voldemort is nearby or feeling particularly murderous and that what he sees in his dreams may be actually happening. In the movie, he tells him not to dwell on his dreams, which is I did not like.

Minor Spoiler Harry learns that Neville’s parents are insane and reside in St. Mungo’s in the book, but he only knows they were tortured in the movie. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler Harry is secured to Voldemort’s father’s grave with ropes in the book, but he is secured to a grim reaper statue by its scythe in the movie. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler Voldemort doesn’t address the missing Death Eaters in the movie. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler In the book, Voldemort performs both the Imperius Curse and the Cruciatus Curse on Harry in the graveyard, but he does neither in the movie (I’m no completely positive that he doesn’t do Crucio). End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler In the movie, Amos Diggory runs into the crowd when Cedric and Harry return and laments over his son’s dead body, but in the book, Harry is taken away before Cedric’s parents can be told. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler In the book, Moody takes Harry from the field after Dumbledore has told Harry to stay there, but in the movie, Dumbledore never says to stay on the field. End Spoiler

Ending Spoiler I don’t think they had to use Veritaserum on Barty, Jr. in the movie. End Spoiler

Triwizard Changes (Spoiler-Ridden Section)

The changes specific to the three tasks get their own sections because, while the gist of each task was the same, there were some fundamental differences, and lots of ‘em.

The First Task

In the book, Hagrid tells Harry that he wants to show him something later and to bring his cloak. In the movie, Ron tells Hermione to tell Harry that Seamus told him that Dean heard from Parvati that Hagrid’s looking for him, Harry that is. It is a cute scene, though. Later, Ron says that Seamus never actually told him anything, so that means he was helping Harry on his own. Also, in the book, Ludo Bagman hands out the miniature dragons, but in the movie, Bagman not existing, Barty Crouch hands out the miniatures.

Then there’s the actual task. In the book, the dragon doesn’t want to get up and leave her eggs (she has real eggs in addition to the gold one). Harry has to lure her up to grab the egg. In the movie, she’s flying at him and spitting fire from the get-go. It’s even hard to get his Firebolt because of her. She also only has the golden egg. She breaks her chain trying to get Harry and chases him all around the castle in a pointless bit of action that could have been used on S.P.E.W. or Ludo Bagman.

The Second Task

“Come and seek us where our voices sound,
We cannot sing above the ground,
And while you’re searching ponder this:
We’ve taken what you’ll sorely miss,
An hour long you’ll have to look,
And to recover what we took,
But past an hour—the prospect’s black,
_Too late, it’s gone, it won’t come back._”
—the golden egg, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 463

They sing this song in the movie. I’m sorry, part of this song. Why does it matter, you ask? I’ll tell you. It matters because they leave out the part of the song where the merpeople imply that the hostages will die _. Harry just assumes that they will die in the movie, I guess, I mean, he doesn’t explain. In both the book and the movie, it is silly for Harry to think Dumbledore would let the hostages die, or maybe not considering the last three years Harry has been at Hogwarts haven’t gone so swimmingly (ha ha, “swimmingly” and he’s in the lake). In any case, he at least has a _reason, or more of a reason, to think they might die in the book than he does in the movie.

When Harry does go to the second task, he’s late because he fell asleep in the library trying to figure out how to survive underwater for an hour. Dobby wakes him up because he doesn’t want him to lose his “Wheezy” and gives him Gillyweed. In the book, Neville is the one who gives him the Gillyweed. In the book, Harry swims in his robes because he’s unprepared (don’t they wear something under their robes, so why couldn’t he take off the robes?), while in the movie, he is dressed more appropriately for swimming. Moaning Myrtle also makes another appearance in the lake when Harry is down there, and I believe she points him in the right direction.

And in the book, both Ron and Hermione think Harry was being stupid trying to wait for all the hostages to get rescued, while in the movie, Hermione is all, “I think it’s noble” or something. And it is after this task that Viktor Krum asks Hermione to visit him in the summer. In the movie he just asks her to write to him at the very end of the year.

The Third Task

“First think of the person who lives in disguise,
Who deals in secrets and tells naught but lies.
Next, tell me what’s always the last thing to mend,
The middle of middle and end of the end?
And finally give me the sound often heard
During the search for a hard to find word.
Now string them together, and answer me this,
Which creature would you be unwilling to kiss?
—the sphinx, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 629

Oh, the third task, possibly the least accurate task in the movie. The maze doesn’t have any of the obstacles from the book (unless you count Imperio! Krum). Instead, it has evil hedges that pull people inside them, not that that’s not scary, but still. There were no blast-ended skrewts in the maze, no giant spider, and, most importantly, no sphinx. Harry doesn’t have to answer the sphinx’s riddle. That was one of the coolest obstacles. That and the upside down mist. I would have loved to see the upside down mist. And when Cedric is attacked by Imperio! Krum, they don’t know he’s cursed in the book; they just think he’s a dark wizard. In the movie, Harry knows he’s cursed, but sends up red sparks for him anyway. Krum also actually casts Crucio on Cedric in the book. And Harry never sees what happened to Fleur in the book and doesn’t send up sparks for her. In the movie, she gets pulled under a hedge, and Harry sends up sparks for her. Also, it is not stated until after the task that Moody is the one who put the cup at the center of the maze in the book. In the movie, they say for beforehand.

Anyway when Harry gets past the sphinx to where he can see the cup, he sees Cedric coming from the opposite way. They start to race, but then Harry has to warn Cedric about a giant spider headed his way, rather than save him from the evil hedges. Harry distracts the spider, which then comes after him and hurts his leg. Cedric then saves Harry, who falls from the spider, becoming still more injured. Then they argue about who should win and decide to go together. Then they grab the portkey cup and are transported to the graveyard, where Cedric is murdered (“Kill the spare!”). Harry’s injury makes his trial in the graveyard a lot more difficult, but the injury doesn’t exist in the movie.

What They Did Right

Teenage Problems

All the mopey teen angst was done really well. The fighting between Harry and Ron. The fighting between Ron and Hermione. Ron’s jealousy of Krum was really well done too.

Cedric’s End (Ending Spoilers)

“Remember Cedric. Remember, if the time should come when you have to make a choice between what is right and what is easy, remember what happened to a boy who was good, and kind, and brave, because he strayed across the path of Lord Voldemort. Remember Cedric Diggory.”
—Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 724

I thought that Cedric’s death was handled very well in the movie. It was short and unexpected just as it had been in the novel. I was glad they didn’t draw it out. They also did Harry’s reaction very well. My favorite thing about his death, which wasn’t even in the book, was his father screaming for him. It was just so sad. The speech at the end to all the students was done well too.

Final Grade: C+

This movie receives a C+ because it left out so much stuff, some of which was important to later installments. If it had been two movies, it might have been better, and it would have set the precedent for the rest of them to be two movies. However, I don’t know if this option was ever seriously considered, or if it would have worked if it had been two films. It could, however, have been a little longer. If it was about twenty minutes longer and the fluff (I’m looking at you, dragon chase) was cut and replaced with more worthy material, it may have been fine. In any case, I do think that the film is (mostly) true to the spirit of the book, and they did better with the relationships in this movie than they did in the last one. It just leaves out a lot of the fun stuff.

Wow. This review was very long. Maybe I should have split it into two articles, but I decided to make one 3 ½ hour article with an intermission instead.

Lord Voldemort had risen again
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, page 643

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Comment

  1. Cadaver on 27 June 2011, 18:43 said:

    In the movie, Neville is the one who gives him the Gillyweed.

    I liked that about the movie. You can never have too much Neville, amirite or amirite?

  2. NeuroticPlatypus on 27 June 2011, 18:51 said:

    Yeah, since Dobby wasn’t there, it was good they gave Neville more to do since they cut a lot his moments in the earlier films. Plus, I love when he says, “Oh my God. I’ve killed Harry Potter.”

  3. Dana on 27 June 2011, 19:47 said:

    In the book, Voldemort performs both the Imperius Curse and the Cruciatus Curse on Harry in the graveyard, but he does neither in the movie (I’m no completely positive that he doesn’t do Crucio).

    Yes, he actually did both, as far as I remember. He Imperio-ed him into bowing, and Crucio-ed him just ‘cause.

  4. Dana on 27 June 2011, 19:50 said:

    *In the movie. (Sorry, should’ve been more specific in my first post.)

  5. NeuroticPlatypus on 27 June 2011, 19:56 said:

    He did the bowing in the book too, but it wasn’t imperio. They didn’t say what it was specifically, but Harry didn’t go into the peaceful trance thing like when he was under imperio. He used imperio in the book to try to make Harry say that he didn’t want to be crucioed anymore in the book, but it didn’t work.

    You’re right about crucio, though. I just didn’t remember if he used it in the movie or not.

  6. Dana on 27 June 2011, 20:04 said:

    Oops. Sorry, then. I haven’t watched the movie in a while, so I was going solely on my (scattered) memories of that scene. But I’m pretty sure he did crucio him in the movie.

  7. Curly on 27 June 2011, 21:18 said:

    I think I’ve only seen the movie once, but the bland maze and the stupid dragon chase thingy over the castle for no reason always seemed a bit odd. But I like it when they sing the Hogwarts school song while they walk through some trees somewhere, though that might be in a different movie.

  8. Curly on 27 June 2011, 21:20 said:

    Oh, and sorry for the double post, but Voldemort looks really weird to me. Well, not so much looks, but his voice is too full of emotion for my liking, and he flounces around like he’s at the Mardi Gras. Well, that’s how I remember, it anyway.

  9. NeuroticPlatypus on 27 June 2011, 21:25 said:

    Yeah, you’re right, they sing the song in this one.

    he flounces around like he’s at the Mardi Gras.

    Haha. I like this imagery. I’m imagining him with green Mardi Gras beads.

  10. Cadaver on 28 June 2011, 08:43 said:

    but his voice is too full of emotion for my liking, and he flounces around like he’s at the Mardi Gras.

    The movies totally ruined Voldemort for me. In the fifth one, at the end there’s like this damn flash back scene and his hands are out and he goes “Dah!” And that’s it, and it makes no sense, so when I finally read all the books, all I could think of was Voldemort flying around like a damn fairy going “Dah!”

  11. Nate Winchester on 28 June 2011, 10:45 said:

    Another twenty minutes (making it about three hours long) would have done nicely, or just putting in important things from the book rather than extending scenes that don’t need extending and adding things that don’t need to be there.

    Yeah… that’s what I keep shouting every time I talk about the HP movies… but I’m on medication now so it’s better.
    Still, best idea is 7 season TV series. Preferably animated but live action could work. I think the cost issues with TV would encourage the makers to really make the magic more “subtle” which would be more in line with the books.

    Michael Gambon as Albus Dumbledore: Why am I reviewing Gambon again? Because Dumbledore is not that angry! He doesn’t grab Harry and yell at him about putting his name in the Goblet of Fire. I will say that this may have not been so much Gambon’s fault as it was the writers and the director, but still. Dumbledore’s character was just really off.

    I too, really hated all of that.

    Robert Pattinson as Cedric Diggory: Isn’t Pattinson so much more attractive as Cedric than he is in those adaptations of The-Series-That-Must-Not-Be-Named? Yes, yes he is. He also has considerably more acting ability. And I’d much rather listen to him talk in this accent than the other. It’s really a shame that poor Robert can’t be remembered for being Cedric Diggory instead of You-Know-Who (hint: it’s not Voldemort).

    Huh?

    I don’t get it.

    Stanislav Ianevski as Viktor Krum: Krum is not supposed to be attractive. Hermione even says in the book that he’s not attractive, and everyone only likes him because he’s famous. Ianevski’s eyebrows are not bushy enough. I thought his acting was okay, though. But I have another gripe with the writers: Krum is not an idiot! He seemed to be at least of average intelligence in the book, and Hermione actually likes him. In the movie, she says he like talking to wood or something, which implies that he is just a dumb jock, but he’s not supposed to be like that. Urgh. He’s not stupid!

    So we have a double instance of “hollywood ugly” AND “hollywood smart” eh?

    He’s a heartless bastard in the book, for one, but he’s not in the movie. “It destroyed Barty to send his son to Azkaban.” Yeah, sure it did.

    Not sure I agree with that assessment… but that’s what good stories do. Make you debate the characters.

    Without this subplot, there isn’t really an explanation for how the twins get enough money, coming from a very poor family, to open their shop.

    Not to mention one of the narrative’s biggest moments of heartwarming.

    There is no mention of the other students that grow beards attempting to trick the Goblet in the film, and Fred and George don’t go to the hospital wing to get theirs removed.

    They also fight instead of laughing at each other when it happens. I was angry about that.

    In the book, Moody takes Harry from the field after Dumbledore has told Harry to stay there, but in the movie, Dumbledore never says to stay on the field.

    I dispute that this is a minor change as in the books, it was THE clue that told Dumbledoor that Moody wasn’t Moody.

  12. NeuroticPlatypus on 28 June 2011, 19:33 said:

    Not sure I agree with that assessment… but that’s what good stories do. Make you debate the characters.

    Well, I did oversimplify his character. I’m sure he did care about his son somewhat, but he was presented too sympathetically in the movie. That was my main gripe with him.

    I dispute that this is a minor change as in the books, it was THE clue that told Dumbledoor that Moody wasn’t Moody.

    Yeah, that section has turned into minor changes and changes that take long enough to explain for their own section.

  13. Nate Winchester on 28 June 2011, 19:54 said:

    Well, I did oversimplify his character. I’m sure he did care about his son somewhat, but he was presented too sympathetically in the movie. That was my main gripe with him.

    How’s that for irony? I think one of the big problems was the movie oversimplifying the character. Though I think I can agree with you that if they were going to simplify an embodiment of the conflict between family & duty, I would have preferred they went the other way than what they did.

    Yeah, that section has turned into minor changes and changes that take long enough to explain for their own section.

    First you lie to us and now this????

    ^ _ ^

  14. NeuroticPlatypus on 28 June 2011, 20:25 said:

    Though I think I can agree with you that if they were going to simplify an embodiment of the conflict between family & duty, I would have preferred they went the other way than what they did.

    It think that’s what I was thinking, but that ended up not being what I wrote. I dunno.

    First you lie to us and now this????

    I know! I’m horrible, aren’t I? I’ll retitle that section next time around. “Minor Changes that May or May Not Really Matter”????

  15. Nate Winchester on 28 June 2011, 21:05 said:

    Completely horrible!

    Thankfully I’m a soulless monster who blew up the world so you still look good by comparison. =D

  16. falconempress on 11 July 2011, 02:55 said:

    I am not going to say a single word of complaint about Krum being way hotter in the movie than he was in the books. I mean, just look at that picture! Look at it…look…

    Er, what were we talking about again?

    Ralph Fiennes as Lord Voldemort: I almost forgot to add him. Seriously. What is wrong with me? Anyway, He does very, very well, in my opinion. Some more fun IMDb trivia for ya: They did his nose with computer effects to make it creepier, and the reason he doesn’t have red eyes is because Fiennes thought that his eye expression would portray the evil and madness better.

    iLOLd SO HARD when I read that bit. Seriously? Damn. Ralph Fiennes is intense.

    Completely agree on Pattison/Cedric. The-Series-That-Shall-Not-Be-Named does abuse his talent, range and attractiveness appallingly.

    By the way, did you know that until Tom Cruise came along, Rupert Grint was the fastest celebrity ever on Top Gear? How cool is that?

  17. Tolly on 11 July 2011, 03:30 said:

    His screaming “That’s my son! That’s my boy!” is simply heartbreaking.

    This. This right here. I was still relatively calm until that moment, and then I started sobbing into my friend’s shoulder. (Thankfully I have very understanding friends.)

  18. TamtheHam on 21 December 2011, 08:55 said:

    another change that i dont think you mentioned was:In the film they show victor alone putting his name in the cup but in the book both foreign schools all put there names in the cup. This did not make sense to me, the film made out like the other students from durmstrang were just there to cheer on krum when they all wanted to compete. also what was with that horrible entrance from both schools no need in it it’s worse than alfonso adding something wicked this way comes to the previous film.